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Around-the-World Tickets and Fares

Around-the-world travel isn't just for the young or the independently wealthy. Students, retirees and even working folks with a few weeks of vacation time can take advantage of the convenient pricing and flexibility of around-the-world tickets. You can travel around the world for nearly any length of time, from a few days to a few years. Your trip can involve a couple of brief stops or dozens of stopovers and side trips.

travel backpack beach

And it needn't cost as much as you might think. Economy-class fares for the most basic around-the-world tickets start at less than $2,000.

An around-the-world ticket is a special fare (or a series of point-to-point tickets) that allows you to fly to multiple cities and continents. These tickets are sold through airline alliances and agencies that specialize in around-the-world travel, and they can help you save money and organize your itinerary. Read on for a run-down on where to buy around-the-world tickets, how they work and what they cost.

When to Consider an Around-the-World Ticket

Consider an around-the-world ticket if you're traveling to multiple continents within the same trip. (If you're focusing on a single continent, an air pass may be a better bet.) Plot out your preferred countries or cities, along with a rough idea of how long you'd like to spend in each place, and then turn to one of the providers listed below for help in planning your itinerary.

Note that it is possible to craft your own around-the-world ticket of sorts simply by pricing out each leg of your trip individually. We recommend doing a quick price check using a site like Kayak.com or Momondo.com, and then comparing the fares you see against the offerings from the providers below.

Who Offers Around-the-World Tickets?

There are two main types of around-the-world ticket providers: airlines and specialist agencies.

Airlines: The three global airline alliances allow you to link together the routes of any member airlines to create one continuous global trip. Each alliance offers at least one around-the-world ticket option.

Fares are calculated based on the total mileage of your trip or the number of continents you visit. You are permitted anywhere from 3 to 15 stopovers in a period of 10 days to a year. These tickets may not be your most flexible option, as some require you to reserve all legs of your trip in advance. There may be restrictions on which direction you can travel (some around-the-world fares require that you travel only in a single direction, either east to west or vice versa), or how many miles you can fly.

One advantage of booking your around-the-world ticket through an airline alliance is that you'll be eligible to earn frequent flier miles toward the airline loyalty program of your choice.

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Information about around-the-world tickets on each alliance can be found at the following links:

Oneworld
SkyTeam
Star Alliance

Specialist Agencies: Many of these agencies are consolidators who can piece together point-to-point one-way tickets that undercut the lowest economy fares from the airline alliances. Be sure to ask whether your ticket will be eligible for frequent flier miles, as this may vary from one agency to the next.

man with backpack at airport gate

You will find that around-the-world fares through these agencies begin at about $1,300, which is a very basic New York - London - Hong Kong - New York ticket. Rather than selling you a single around-the-world ticket, the agency will ask you where you want to stop, then issue you a series of point-to-point tickets. If you live near a small airport, you'll likely need to transfer through larger gateways before embarking on the international portion of your trip.

Here are several agencies that specialize in around-the-world tickets:

AirTreks
Indie
STA Travel
TicketsRoundtheWorld.com

Editor's Note: While we have had great experiences with some of the companies listed above, this is a cutthroat business with very small margins. Please take the same precautions you would in buying a ticket from an around-the-world specialist as you would from a consolidator, such as charging your tickets on a credit card and confirming all reservations/seat assignments with the airlines directly.

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What to Consider When Purchasing an Around-the-World Ticket

Flexibility: This may be the single most important factor in the success of your trip. Want the option to stick around New Zealand for an extra two weeks, or to fly to Bangkok instead of Beijing? Be sure to read the terms and conditions carefully before you book your around-the-world ticket. Ask which reservations need to be confirmed ahead of time, how easily you can alter your original dates or itinerary, and which change fees or fare increases may apply. Keep in mind that flexibility may often come with higher fares, so you'll need to weigh your budget against your travel plans.

Class: For many travelers, flying first or business class is well out of their price range -- but if you've got a little cushion in your travel budget, consider whether it's worth spending the extra money to buy an around-the-world ticket in business class. Flying long distances and living on the road for an extended period of time can be hard on your body, and you may be surprised at how much you appreciate that relaxing flight in a spacious airline seat when you've been on the go for four months straight.

Alternatives: If money is a concern, keep in mind that using your around-the-world ticket may not always be the most economical option for getting from Point A to Point B. For shorter segments of your trip, check the local train or bus services as well as any discount airlines that operate in the region. They may take a little more planning and coordination, but these alternatives could save you some cash.

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--updated by Sarah Schlichter

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