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Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two up-close animal encounters.

Would you rather…

… meet penguins in Antarctica, or …

penguin photographer antarctica



… come face to face with a llama in Peru?

arequipa peru llama child


Penguins can be seen by the thousands in Antarctica; the best way to visit is by cruise ship. In Peru, llamas are commonly seen near Machu Picchu and in other areas of the Andes Mountains.

Photos: Amazing, Up-Close Animal Encounters

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Would you pay $1,013 for a salad? How about $2,700 for sushi?

These exorbitant dishes and many others are on a “menu” of the world’s most expensive food, put together by Chris Sibbet of FinancesOnline.com. Sibbet scoured the globe to find lavish offerings like the aforementioned salad, which is made of “beluga caviar, grated truffle, potatoes with gold leaf, Cornish crab and lobster and 30-year-old balsamic vinegar” and can be ordered at the Hempel Hotel in London.

If you’d rather drop a few grand on sushi, head to Angelito Areneta’s Golden Sushi in Manila, where the fish is wrapped in 24-carat gold and crowned with three pearls.

The total cost for all the decadent dishes rounded up by Sibbet (many of which were created as fundraisers for charity) adds up to a whopping $95,065. Bon apetit!

The Most Expensive Dishes In The World: How To Plan The Pricest Meal Ever

Republished from alternatives.financesonline.com — Published by Chris Sibbet — See our Vimeo

International Foods to Try Before You Die
12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two “solid gold” destinations.

Would you rather…

… explore Buddhist temples in Thailand, or …

wat phra that doi suthep, chiang mai



… lie on a stretch of golden sand in St. Lucia?

st lucia beach


The Buddhist temple pictured above is Wat Phra That Doi Suthep in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and it dates all the way back to the 1300s. Located on a mountain, it offers sweeping views of Chiang Mai. St. Lucia is home to a number of lovely beaches, including some with views of its famous Twin Pitons.

IT.com Readers Reveal What’s on Their Bucket Lists

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

This week’s travel puzzle is part of our ongoing Flag Friday series of challenges. Can you identify which nation the following flag belongs to?


Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, August 11, 2014, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Cat snedeker, who correctly guessed that this week’s flag was from Antigua and Barbuda. Cat has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Congratulations!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two places that art fans would love to explore.

Would you rather…

… see the sculptures in Vigeland Park, Oslo, or …

vigeland park oslo



… wander the galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City?

metropolitan museum of art new york


The incredible human sculptures in Vigeland Park helped land Oslo on our list of The Best 9 Cities to See Cool Public Art. Meanwhile, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is the largest and most famous art museum in a city that has dozens of them. Allow a day just to get a taste.

10 Best Norway Experiences

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Each month, we’ll highlight one new trip review submitted by an IndependentTraveler.com reader. If your review is featured, you’ll win an IndependentTraveler.com logo item!

itusukushima shrineIn this month’s featured review, reader Eric Overn shares advice from a couple of business trips to Japan: “It helps to learn a Japanese character of the city you’ll be staying at or going to, if using the local trains,” writes Eric. “Knowing just one character will help you locate your city on the route map. ‘Yama’ looks like a square ‘W.’ Toku-yama, Yama-guchi.”

Read the rest of Eric’s review here: Japan Trip. Eric has won an IndependentTraveler.com duffel bag!

Feeling inspired? Write your own trip review!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

airport baggage claimBy next year, there may only be one airline in the U.S. that lets fliers check a bag for free.

While both JetBlue and Southwest currently allow travelers to bring aboard a complimentary checked bag (Southwest even lets you have two!), Bloomberg reports that JetBlue is looking into overhauling its ticket pricing structure, which will likely lead to a few extra fees for those who pay the cheapest possible fare.

According to Bloomberg, the airline plans to create multiple fare classes, some of which would include a free bag and/or other services. Fliers could pay a higher rate for a more inclusive fare, or pony up for their checked bag if they elect the cheapest available fare. The changes are expected to take effect within the first six months of 2015.

This sort of bundling isn’t new. Frontier Airlines and Air Canada are among the carriers that currently offer multiple fare options when booking. Frontier’s Classic Plus fares are fully refundable and include a free checked bag, extra legroom and a beverage, while its bare-bones Economy fares are cheaper and include none of the above. Air Canada offers Tango, Flex and Latitude fares, each of which comes with different benefits (or lack thereof) such as waived change fees, priority check-in and standby privileges. (Worth noting: In all three of Air Canada’s fare classes you’ll have to pay for checked bags.)

How to Hack Your Way to a Cheaper Airfare

Naturally, JetBlue’s proposed changes are all about money; Bloomberg reports that the airline’s profits trail those of its competitors. I know airlines aren’t charities and they need to make a buck, but it’s still a bummer for those of us who appreciate companies that don’t try to nickel and dime us.

Will you still fly JetBlue if these changes go into effect?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two places with spiritual significance to their respective cultures.

Would you rather…

… trek to Lamayuru, a Buddhist monastery in the mountains of Ladakh, India, or …

lamayuru monastery india



… visit the ruins of Xunantunich in Belize?

xunantunich mayan ruins belize


India’s remote Lamayuru Monastery, once home to as many as 450 Buddhist monks, is best reached by a difficult but spectacular two-week trek through the mountains of Ladakh. (Banjara Camps & Retreats is one company that offers trips.) Easier to reach are the ruins of Xunantunich in Belize, accessible by car and various tours. The site includes the ruins of several temples dedicated to Mayan gods.

India Trip Reviews
Belize Trip Reviews

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

patricia schultzEleven years ago, a book called “1,000 Places to See Before You Die” became a runaway bestseller, inspiring millions of travelers to create their own must-visit lists. With the 1,200-page tome now in its second edition, we sat down with the author, Patricia Schultz, to talk about the difficulty of narrowing the world down to 1,000 places and to find out what’s still on her own bucket list.

IndependentTraveler.com: Have you visited every place in the book?
Patricia Schultz: No, I haven’t. If I was part of a typical travel guide team — let’s say Lonely Planet or Fodor’s — the answer would likely be different. But these “1,000 Places” books are written in the voice of one traveler … and there are only so many hours in my years!

IT: Were there any destinations or experiences you wanted to include but couldn’t? Why did you leave them out?
PS: With the “1,000 Places” revision (released in late 2011), I attempted to keep all my favorites from the original 2003 book while adding hundreds of new places I had discovered since then. That meant a complete reorganization, merging many places into a single entry at times to accommodate new information and destinations — 28 new countries! All while keeping the count at 1,000. But it’s laughable, really, to think that one could ever sit back and feel that no stone went unturned! That’s what keeps every traveler going. The intoxicating promise of something new and wonderful around the bend.

IT: How long would it realistically take to see everything in the book? (And how much money?)
PS: I’m afraid there is no easy answer for that. The book was not meant to be followed from cover to cover. I hope travelers discerningly pick and choose from this list of my favorites to add to their own wish lists. Does everyone want to see the fjords of Norway? The wine region of Chile? What if it is great art that inspires you — would you spend your time and money on an African safari? Time is short, [and] one needs to follow one’s own interests. What are the things and places that call you? Travel is a very personal thing.

Bucket List Travel Guide

IT: Some travelers may feel intimidated by the size of the book (or the size of the world!). Do you have any advice to help people feel inspired instead of overwhelmed?
PS: Most of us have “short lists.” Was there a film or book that inspired you? Has your family’s ancestry always fascinated you? Is ancient history your thing? Food? It is useless if you choose a destination simply because a friend has talked you into it or because you found a cheap flight. Follow your heart. Me? I wanted to go everywhere! So it was all good.

IT: The book has spawned a genre of sorts in travel — I can’t count how many lists I’ve seen of “places to visit before you’re 30″ or “destinations to take your family before your kids grow up.” Did you have any sense of how influential the book would be when you were writing it?
PS: No! I just kept writing away, trying to make sense of this vast and magnificent world and its wonders large and small. My eye was on the book deadline (I was given one year to write it but in fact it took eight), not future sales. I wanted to do the job as best I could, and hoped that I would sell enough copies to make my publisher happy and to pay off my credit card debt. I fulfilled both those goals! We have over 25 translations around the world, and it spawned a sister title, “1,000 Places to See in the USA & Canada Before You Die.”

IT: What’s still on your own bucket list?
PS: There are many countries I have not yet visited … Fiji, Romania, Uganda, among others. And although I have visited massive countries like China, Russia and India, I don’t pretend to know them well. Then there are those perennial loves I could return to time and again — Paris, Rome, Hong Kong, Rio. I could go on. My bucket list has a bucket list!

How to Make Your Dream Trip a Reality

Want to win your own copy of “1,000 Places to See Before You Die”? Leave a comment below and tell us what’s at the top of your own travel wish list! Leave your comment by 11:59 p.m. ET on July 27, 2014. We’ll pick one winner at random. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. Congratulations to Jeanette A., who has won the book! Stay tuned for further opportunities to win.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two destinations that commonly appear on travel bucket lists.

Would you rather…

… go on safari in Africa, or …

lions african safari



… find ultimate relaxation in French Polynesia?

bora bora kayak


An African safari is a common bucket list trip for travelers who love wildlife. Learn more with our guide to Planning an African Safari. The farflung islands of French Polynesia, with their aquamarine waters and lush palms, inspire many a wintertime daydream among those of us who live in colder climes.

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter