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This week’s puzzle is a word scramble. Below are the jumbled names of four major cities from around the world, followed by the country where they’re located. Your job is to unscramble them. For example, “IALM, EURP” would be “Lima, Peru.” Multi-word cities or countries are scrambled into one word, so “San Juan” might appear as SJAANUN. (Hint: This week there is one multi-word city.) Identify all four mystery cities to win.

GVAENE, LRTWEIZDNAS

HDOA, ARTQA

BOTOEGMYNA, AJAICMA

AOLGS, RIEINAG


Enter your list of unscrambled cities in the comments below. You have until Monday, December 5, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

— created by Sarah Schlichter

Read up on the news and stories you may have missed this week from around the travel world.

travelers on segways


The Inventions That Ruined Travel
Have a laugh over this tongue-in-cheek list of travel abominations from the Telegraph, featuring things like Segways, wax museums and “ride-on” suitcases. Our favorite is the section on selfie sticks, or “this narcissistic weapon of Satan.”

Otherworldly Silence
Warning: After clicking through this stunning Maptia photo essay about Antarctica, you may find yourself researching trips to the world’s most remote continent.

From Grand Hotel to Microhotel: How Your Stay Has Changed in 200 Years
Conde Nast Traveler surveys two centuries of hotel trends, starting with the grand properties that sprang up in 19th-century Europe and extending through the chain hotels of the early 20th century and the hip boutiques of the 1980s and 1990s. The author even offers a vision of what hotels might look like in the future.

29 Travel Hacks That Even Frequent Fliers Don’t Know
Insider rounds up some clever tips that go beyond the usual travel advice, including grabbing a cab in your airport’s departure zone instead of at arrivals and keeping a small waterproof bag packed at all times with necessary chargers and cables.

Fake Service Animals and Why Airline Passengers Are Upset
South Florida’s Sun Sentinel reports on a growing trend: the rise in service and emotional support animals on planes. Some travelers are abusing the laws requiring airlines to accept service animals by pretending that their pets are traveling with them for emotional support when they’re really just trying to evade the rules and fees for bringing a pet onboard.

5 Ways Travel for Frequent Fliers Got Worse in 2016
Skift offers a glum look at the air travel landscape, which in 2016 featured rising admission fees to airline lounges and the advent of “basic economy” fares.

12 Poignant Images of Tribal Peoples Around the World
Rough Guides showcases the photos that will appear in the 2017 calendar of Survival International, an advocacy group for the rights of indigenous peoples around the world. These images capture these people’s human dignity and endangered lifestyle.

This week’s video is a mesmerizing peek into the Kyushu region of Japan.


12 Best Japan Experiences
18 Best Airport Hacks

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Many modern rental cars offer sophisticated “infotainment” systems that can link up to your smartphone via Bluetooth, allowing you to make hands-free calls, stream your music through the vehicle’s speakers and use your favorite map app for navigation. But these systems can pose a security risk by storing your personal data, including contacts, call logs, text messages and the places you visit during your rental.

smartphone in car


“Unless you delete that data before you return the car, other people may view it, including future renters and rental car employees or even hackers,” cautions the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

So how can you enjoy the convenience of your car’s infotainment system without compromising your security? Collin Ikim of Magrenta, a Romanian car rental company, says he always shows clients how to wipe their data from the system before returning their vehicles. “Most people return [their] rental car at the last moment, when they’re already in a hurry,” he says. “You should give yourself time to remove the personal data stored in the car. It’s a matter of minutes.”

Ikim recommends going into the settings menu of the infotainment system. “There you’ll find a list of devices that have been paired: locate yours and follow the prompts to delete it. If you used the car’s navigation system, clear your location history.”

If all you need is to charge your phone, both Ikim and the FTC recommend using an adapter to power the device via the car’s cigarette lighter rather than connecting via USB to the infotainment system, which might capture your data automatically.

If you do decide to use the system, you can usually choose which data you want to share. Keep your permissions as limited as possible to avoid putting information unnecessarily at risk.

For those renting a car in their own local area, Ikim offers one final suggestion: “Consider setting your home address to a nearby intersection. If strangers get … access to your car, they won’t know the precise directions to your specific home address.”

11 Ways to Prevent Identity Theft While Traveling
Avoiding Identity Theft: A Cautionary Tale at 35,000 Feet

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed from around the travelsphere.

ryanair plane


Many Ryanair Flights Could Be Free in a Decade, Says Its Chief
Most airline news these days is about reduced services and extra fees, but here’s something a little different: The CEO of Ryanair, a European discounter, recently said that he wants his carrier to offer free flights within the next five to 10 years, reports the Guardian. Instead of charging for airfare, the airline would make money via a revenue share with the airports from which the carrier’s passengers fly.

Airbnb Broadens Its Business with Tours and Travel Experiences
Airbnb made a splash this past week when it announced that it was expanding its offerings to include tours and activities, reports the New York Times. Examples include a two-day Behind the Art experience in Miami, in which you can meet local artists, and stargazing excursions in Los Angeles.

Visions of Kenya
We love this black and white photo essay from Maptia, in which the photographer offers both wild landscape images and intimate portraits from his monthlong solo trip to Kenya.

Every Country’s Tourism Slogan, In One Map
This Digg map of the world’s tourism slogans makes for fun browsing. Some countries’ slogans are enticing (“Brunei: a kingdom of unexpected treasures”), others are odd (“El Salvador: the 45-minute country”) and still others simply make us laugh (“Visit Armenia, it is beautiful”).

In Praise of Bus Travel, the Least Glamorous But Most Lovable Way to Travel
This first-person essay from the Los Angeles Times is a paean to both the pleasures and quirks of traveling by bus, from the ratty seats and the diversity of the passengers to the “sweet way the self disappears during bus travel.”

Why It’s Time to Rethink Frequent Flier Programs
Airfarewatchdog founder (and frequent traveler) George Hobica argues in the Huffington Post that airline loyalty programs are becoming less useful to many travelers — and should therefore inspire less loyalty.

Inside the Airport of the Future
Conde Nast Traveler rounds up more than a half-dozen technological innovations happening at airports around the world, including scanners that don’t require liquids to be removed from your carry-on and personalized navigation systems that send you directions based on where you’re standing in the terminal.

This week’s video, which features a narrator reciting Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road,” captures the spirit of why we travel.


16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel
Survey Says: Travel Makes Us Happier

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editor’s Note: IndependentTraveler.com is published by The Independent Traveler, Inc., a subsidiary of TripAdvisor, Inc., which also owns Airfarewatchdog.com.

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: This famous waterfall is hidden in the jungle, accessible only by boat or plane.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, November 21, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com prize. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Brian, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was Angel Falls, Venezuela. Brian has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed from around the travel-verse this week.

happy traveler in the mountains


This Travel Hacker Paid $400 for a $52,000 Round-the-World Trip — Here’s How He Did It
Business Insider profiles an ultra-creative traveler who stockpiled a million frequent flier miles via various travel credit cards and then used them to fund an extensive around-the-world vacation.

Why I Think Travel Is So Important Now
Wendy Perrin offers a moving essay on the importance of travel after the recent U.S. election, which has started a national discussion about which of us live in our own little “bubbles.” Perrin argues that all of us live in such bubbles, and that travel is a good way to break out of them and experience other perspectives.

Lessons from the Road: What It Was Like to Write the First Ever Rough Guide to India
Ever wondered what it’s like to write one of those authoritative guidebooks that help you get around a new place? Rough Guides interviews one of the authors of its first India guidebook in the early 1990s; he reveals the most memorable, strangest and scariest moments of his six months researching the book.

United Airlines Launches Basic Economy, Also Known as ‘Misery Class’
If you’re looking to save on a flight next year, you could consider United’s new Basic Economy class — but it comes with a price, reports the Independent. You won’t be able to choose your seat or bring any carry-on bags beyond a single small personal item.

Family Travel in a Time of Fear
This New York Times essay describes a family trip to France in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in Paris last year. Traveling helps us confront fear, the writer says, but it can’t protect us from the knowledge that there’s danger at home too.

The Persian Art of Etiquette
BBC investigates the Iranian notion of taarof, a complex system of etiquette that involves politeness and indirect communiation.

Most Millennials Put Travel Above Buying a Home or Paying Off Debt
Travel + Leisure reports on a new study by Airbnb and Gfk that found millennials (aged 18 – 35) would rather spend money on travel than they would on buying a home. In the U.S., only savings and investment funds ranked higher than travel among millennial priorities.

We love this colorful video from central Mexico, including footage from Guadalajara, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende.


12 Best Mexico Experiences
10 Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

— written by Sarah Schlichter

In the market for a new toiletry bag? ToiletTree Products, a company that sells bathroom and travel accessories, offers a couple of options worth considering.

toilettree bag with tsa bottles


The Toiletry Bag with 3 TSA Bottles weighs less than half a pound and has a hook you can use to hang it from your hotel or cruise ship’s bathroom door. The main compartment is separated into two parts by a mesh divider; here you’ll find three TSA-approved refillable bottles, with caps labeled as “conditioner,” “shampoo” and “body wash.” (Note that if you’re bringing these bottles in your carry-on on a flight, you’ll need to take them out of the toiletry bag and put them into a clear, quart-size, zip-top plastic bag with your other liquids and gels.)

There’s enough room in the main compartment for other items as well, such as makeup, toothpaste and a toothbrush. The bag also has two flat mesh pockets with zippers where you could slip things such as cotton swabs, feminine products, bandages, razor cartridges and the like. Once you’ve zipped the whole bag, there’s a handle at the top for easy carrying.

This bag sells for $18.95 at ToiletTree.com or at Amazon.com. It currently only comes in one color, navy blue.

toilettree bag


If you’re looking for a heavier-duty option, the Toiletry Bag with Sonic Travel Toothbrush is larger and sturdier, made of synthetic leather instead of polyester. Weighing in at 1.2 pounds, this bag has a main compartment large enough to store full-size toiletry bottles (shaving cream, sunblock, etc.) as well as a hairbrush, comb, large tube of toothpaste, etc.

On the bottom of the bag is a flatter compartment with elastic bands that hold three refillable TSA-size bottles — again marked for shampoo, conditioner and body wash — as well as a slot for the included travel-size sonic toothbrush. (Note that you’ll need to add your own AAA battery.) In this compartment is one wide, flat mesh pocket with a zipper.

This bag isn’t really designed to be used while hanging, so there’s no hook — but there is a handle at one end to carry it. It sells for $29.95 at ToiletTree.com or at Amazon.com. It’s currently only available in black.

Which one should you buy? For travelers looking to pack light and travel only with a carry-on, the smaller bag is a better bet. The larger bag is more suited to road trips or longer vacations where suitcase space and weight aren’t as much of a concern.

The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time
11 Versatile Travel Essentials That Do Double-Duty on the Road

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editorial Disclosure: Some products are sent to us free of charge to be considered for review. We choose products to review based on their relevance and usefulness to our readers. We offer our unbiased opinions and do not promise any editorial coverage, particularly positive reviews.

This week’s puzzle is a country shapes quiz! Take a look at the silhouette and below and tell us which country you think it is.

mystery country


Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, November 14, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Douglas Haddow, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery country was Norway. Douglas has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Catch up with the stories you may have missed over the past seven days.

dubai at night


Top 20 Post-Election Travel Destinations
USA Today reports that TripAdvisor experienced a surge of booking activity from midnight on Election Day to 1 p.m. the day after. The site released the 10 most-booked countries and 10 most-booked cities during that time period. You might find some of them surprising. (The most-booked city? Dubai.)

The Roof of America
Your travel eye candy for the week is this photo essay from Maptia, offering stunning shots of trekking in the mountains of Peru.

Italy’s New ‘Scattered Hotel’ Trend May Save Its Historic Towns
Conde Nast Traveler reports on a fascinating trend in Italy called the albergo diffuso, or “scattered hotel.” This involves turning abandoned historic villages into a resort of sorts, with guestrooms and apartments surrounding a central lobby.

Kris Tompkins: ‘Fighter by Trade,’ Wild at Heart
CNN profiles a woman who has spent more than two decades preserving the Patagonian wilderness in Chile and Argentina by purchasing land and turning it into national parks.

Europe’s Mosquito-Free Island Paradise: Iceland
There are few places on Earth where you won’t be bitten by mosquitoes, but Iceland is one of them, reports the New York Times. This may be thanks to its climate, but global warming could change that in the future.

The Modern Rebirth of the ‘Golden Rule’
BBC explores the state of Penang, Malaysia, where the locals are coping with their multicultural identity with an emphasis on mutual tolerance of different religions and cultures.

Antitrust Suit Against Airlines Can Move Ahead, Judge Says
A lawsuit accusing major U.S. airlines of colluding to set high airfares has been given the go-ahead by a federal judge, who rejected a motion to dismiss it, reports the Los Angeles Times.

This week’s video features a sweet in-flight proposal aboard a Qantas flight from Sydney, Australia to Santiago, Chile.


The 9 Best Places to Travel Alone
10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editor’s Note: IndependentTraveler.com is published by The Independent Traveler, Inc., a subsidiary of TripAdvisor, Inc.

Last month, we gave our readers a chance to win a $50 Amazon gift card by submitting a review of a recent trip. We loved reading their submissions, which inspired us with tales of hiking the Inca Trail in Peru and flying a historic plane in Santa Fe.

running of the bulls pamplona


Deciding on the winner was hard, but in the end we chose The Running of the Bulls by vagabondginger. Here’s an excerpt from her winning review:

“The best bulls from various ranches throughout Spain are brought to Pamplona to make for an exciting event. Certain ranches breed bulls with characteristics to make them brave and aggressive,” writes vagabondginger. “These Spanish Fighting Bulls get to a weight of at least 1,300 pounds and have longer horns than other breeds. Bullfights have a lot of pomp and pageantry, but also passion and drama with protesters. We do not condone or condemn but feel much like Hemingway did in his book ‘Death in the Afternoon’ that it’s part of Spain’s tradition. Someday it may be outlawed.” Read the rest!

While we only had one prize to give away, we also wanted to recognize a few runners-up whose reviews are also well worth a read:

On the Short Inca Trail to Machu Picchu by Carolyn Boyle: ” All the iconic photographs of Machu Picchu in the travel brochures are taken from the perspective of the Terrace of the Ceremonial Rock, with Una Picchu and Huayna Picchu in the background. Near the Guardhouse is a large carved stone, the Ceremonial Rock; some human burials were found near here. This area was about an hour from the Gate of the Sun. At this point we had trekked almost exactly 7 miles, including short detours for ruins and waterfalls. We were fortunate to see Machu Picchu in glorious sunlight at the end of our day.”

MiG 15 Pilot by Stephen Goch: “Larry started the engine, and we taxied out for takeoff. We had to stay below 200 knots (230 mph) until we reached 10,000 feet. Our rate of climb was absolutely amazing! The light aircraft I fly has a rate of climb of between 500 and 700 feet per minute. The jet was climbing at 4,000 feet per minute! It was a fantastic experience.”

Costa Rican Trip by Danielle Toland: “The Costa Rican saying is ‘Pura Vida’ which means pure life. They embody this motto by being happy with their lives, being gracious for what they have, and living slowly and relaxed. I learned to be a little more gracious from them.”

Three Days of Outdoor Activity in San Francisco’s Microclimate by Jen Lucas: “The following day was one that I’ll remember for this lifetime. Everyone recognizes the Golden Gate Bridge as the major landmark of the city which I’ve seen previously but when my friend mentioned us riding bikes across, I visualized myself with a huge Sharpie checking off a large box on my bucket list.”

Feeling inspired? Write a review of your latest trip!

— written by Sarah Schlichter