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Glastonbury TorWe caught wind of Sacred Introvert when a travel deal came through our inbox describing a tour experience that was specifically designed for the introverted traveler. Led by a self-proclaimed introvert, founder Lisa Avebury, the vacation experience is described as “no rushing … no tour guide barking over your thoughts.” Because introverts are often preoccupied with their own thoughts and feelings, sightseeing with Sacred Introvert is designed so there is both group interaction and plenty of downtime for these personality types to recharge and restore.

An article on CNET about Avebury and her travel venture explains that she found the motivation to start her own tour company after viewing a TED talk by Susan Cain on introversion. “It was like my whole world changed in a matter of a few days. I no longer felt like I had a social dysfunction,” Avebury said.

Tips for Introverted Travelers

The retreat, which kicks off with its first departure March 16, is a bit pricey at $3,795 per person (not including airfare). However, it includes 10 days of specially curated sightseeing in England’s Kingdom of Wessex region, with some tours during the more quiet after-hours at some locations. Also, each traveler gets his or her own room without paying a single supplement fee, and accommodations for the tour are held at Glastonbury Abbey, a former monastery. Currently, this is the only itinerary listed — one that is near and dear to Avebury’s heart for its “mystical significance” and place in legend and lore.

“I think it’s a misconception that introverts don’t want to meet new people (or new introverts rather!),” Avebury told CNET. “We just want to be understood and accepted for who we are.”

Would you be interested in taking a vacation designed for introverts?

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: This Tibetan Buddhist monastery is a very old training center for Lamas, settled almost two and a half miles high in a Himalayan valley.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, February 9, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com prize. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Dick Blackburn, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was Ki Gompa (also known as Key, Kee or Kye Monastery) in India‘s Spiti Valley. Dick has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

people traveling in car togetherFar from the romanticized travels of Kerouac in 1960s beatnik America, hitchhiking is not the most viable option for travelers looking to rideshare in 2015. But with the millennial generation so concerned about aiding the environment (decreasing gas emissions) and keeping costs down, the idea of a rideshare is the perfect way to split fuel costs and keep an additional car (or two or three) off the road. The problem was until now, combing boards and listings looking for a reasonably trustworthy person going in the same direction was a tad haphazard.

A new ridesharing community called Tripda plans to take the idea of hitching (or offering up) a ride in to modern times. Available via a website and an app, Tripda connects travelers seeking transportation with those looking for extra passengers to split costs. Think of it like a long-distance Uber with a social aspect (the drivers are people like you already headed in your direction). The company promises security with verification on the identity of drivers, and even a Ladies Only option for women more comfortable traveling with other women. By using Facebook for its login system, Tripda claims that it is easier to connect with your fellow riders, get to know them before you set off into the sunset, and potentially connect with mutual friends or affiliations so there are talking points before you even hit the road.

Top 20 Safe Driving Tips

As a driver, you only accept the passengers you want to accompany you, and as a passenger, you pick travel companions based upon how much you’re looking to contribute, whether you prefer silence to music or conversation, and even whether you mind sharing the backseat with a furry, four-footed traveler. The whole process is intended to eliminate waste, but also to enhance an otherwise lonely or lackluster journey.

Founded just last year, Tripda is intended to be a global platform for transportation and is currently coordinating rides in 13 countries in North America, Latin America and Asia. However, because the site is so new, it can be tricky to find a ride that will suit you. It seems like the “recent rides” are concentrated in California and New York so far.

Tell us: Would you use Tripda on your next road trip?

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

In light of all the precipitation flurrying around in our forecasts and our backyards, we figured why sully winter’s reputation with complaints about shoveling and commuting? Winter can be a downright beautiful season, and it’s so much prettier when you can look and don’t have to touch. We bring you five frozen snowscapes from across the globe to remind you that winter’s wrath can be worth a serious marvel (right after you’re done digging yourself out of it).

Vogel, Triglav natural park, Julian Alps, Slovenia
Triglav National Park in the Julian Alps of Slovenia

The only national park in scenic Slovenia, Triglav gains its name from the country’s highest mountain. Its first recorded ascent was in 1778.

jade dragon snow mountain yunnan china
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, Yunnan Province, in Southwestern China

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain is a mountain massif, or small mountain range in southwest China. Its highest peak, Shanzidou, has only been climbed once — by an American expedition team in 1987.

How to Pack for a Winter Vacation

siberian winter in tobolsk
The Old Siberian Capital of Tobolsk

Once a capital of Siberia, the town of Tobolsk is located at the confluence of the Tobol and Irtysh rivers. Once a strong center of Russian colonization, the region declined when it was bypassed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. It is now one of Russia’s largest petrochemical complexes.

patagonia ice glaciers
A Vast Glacier in Patagonia

Shared by Argentina and Chile, Patagonia is a dense region of natural wonders, including this stretch of glacier that goes for miles. The Perito Moreno glacier is one of the region’s top tourist attractions.

winter greenland tasiilaq
The Town of Tasiilq in East Greenland

With about 2,000 inhabitants, Tasiilaq is the most populous community on the remote eastern coast of Greenland. This tundra region occasionally experiences piteraqs, or cold and damaging winds. Piteraq means “that which attacks you” in the local language.

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

It’s an American epidemic: unused vacation days. Every year, surveys and studies are released with depressing statistics about how little vacation time Americans receive as compared with other westernized nations, and to make it worse, we don’t even take advantage of that time.

Skift released its own survey results this month, showing that 42 percent of Americans didn’t take any vacation days in 2014 — not a single one.

The Costa Rica Tourism Board, citing Expedia’s 2013 Vacation Deprivation Study, saw that 59 percent of Americans feel vacation deprived, and felt that it was a call to action. Calling its campaign Save the Americans, Costa Rica sympathizes with the plight of the overworked American, and rallies its most exotic inhabitants to sway you into vacation submission with a song.

12 Best Costa Rica Experiences

We dare you to watch these cute creatures’ original rendition of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” and not consider booking some time away immediately afterward.



Do you take all of your vacation time? Why or why not?

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: This large volcanic caldera is home to a wealth of wildlife, earning it recognition as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Africa.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, January 19, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com prize. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Ruth M, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was Ngorongoro Crater. This reader has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

woman facing empty picture frames alone in museumPicture Will Smith driving around an abandoned Times Square in the post-apocalyptic movie “I Am Legend.” Now picture yourself on a commercial airplane about to take off with only you and the crew aboard. Maybe not as dramatic as driving a sports car through Manhattan at the end of the world, but for one Brooklyn native, this travel dream became a near-reality on his Delta flight Monday. According to ABC News, Chris O’Leary boarded his delayed flight to New York to find that the rest of the passengers had been rebooked. He documented his experience on social media with updates like, “I just got a personal safety briefing from my two flight attendants.”

Alas, just before take-off another passenger boarded, and “the thrill” had passed for what might have been O’Leary’s only shot at a private plane. Still, we imagine they each had plenty of space to recline and enjoy the peace.

15 Mistakes to Avoid When Traveling Solo

This freak flight occurrence had us thinking: What other travel experiences would you enjoy more if you had them completely and totally to yourself? Would you take a cruise as the only passenger? A train ride as the only occupant? How about having the Pyramids of Giza to yourself? Would having the time and space to wander around major landmarks utterly on your own be more fulfilling, or would it feel strange and deserted without a bit of a crowd?

I would love to have the Louvre, or another cavernous museum, to myself for a day. To me, art is very subjective, and I would prefer to have my own experience interpreting the pieces without anyone else pausing in front to ponder.

Tell us: What travel experiences could you get used to solo?

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

infographic Orbitz holiday stressThe holidays are finally over, and as the long, celebrationless weeks of winter stretch out across our immediate futures, we can reflect upon how stressful — or not — the holidays actually were. Orbitz makes this reflection easy with an eye-catching infographic based upon its 2013 holiday travel trends survey, dubbed a “best-practice guide to holiday travel stressors.” Orbitz found, among other things, that 71 percent of its readers actually found their trips not to be stressful at all.

In the planning stages of holiday travel, 29 percent of respondents said they were more stressed about planning a trip during the winter holiday season (Thanksgiving to New Year’s) than any other time of the year. But a majority — 58 percent — responded that the planning aspect did not stress them at all. (Sounds suspicious to me.) Women were 23 percent more likely to be stressed than men, and travelers aged 18 to 34 were, in general, more stressed than the over-35 crowd (I guess that’s why I’m the stressed one). Unsurprisingly, those with children at home were 19 percent more likely to be stressed than those without kids.

Based on survey responses from travelers who kept their cool, Orbitz suggests developing a trip schedule, booking things in advance and reading customer reviews to ease the planning process.

During travel, suggestions to reduce vacation stress include staying in a hotel for at least part of your trip (rather than with family) and penciling in some personal or down time, while others schedule endless activities to distract them during their time away.

8 Holiday Travel Myths: Debunked!

Despite women experiencing more stress during the planning process, men were more likely to be stressed after a trip than women. Full-time employees were a whopping 82 percent more likely to worry about transitioning back to everyday life than those who are self-employed. Again, those with children seemed to be on edge at every part of a trip — they were 56 percent more likely to be stressed post-vacation than those without kids.

Transitioning “back to reality,” 37 percent of travelers responded that they were stressed and four percent felt “extremely stressed” regarding the transition. The good news? Nearly a third of travelers used the word “enjoyable” to describe their holiday trips.

So what are the keys to handling post-trip anxiety and post-travel blues? More than half keep up with home life while they’re away, 45 percent rarely (if at all) tell their office how to contact them while away and 44 percent never or rarely keep up to date with work while away.

How would you rate your travel stress this past holiday season? I solved it by not going anywhere!

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: Due to its atolls, this nation is one of the most geographically dispersed countries in the world. Some say the aerial view of this island in the Indian Ocean looks like a flower.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, December 29, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com prize. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is J. Kofsky, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was the Maldives. This reader has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

vintage suitcase filled with santa hat and striped socks‘Twas the night before travel, when all through the house
Not a single thing was packed, not even a blouse.
The passports were placed on the table with care,
In hopes that by morning they still would be there.
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of security lines danced in my head.
With mom out in Yonkers and a 4 a.m. flight,
I had just prepared my brain for a long sleepless night,
When on The Weather Channel there arose such a clatter,
I turned up the volume to see what was the matter.

Away to the window I flew like a flash,
My heart did seize up and my teeth they did gnash.
For on the lawn was a fresh layer of snow
That looked like it had inches and inches to go,
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
A winter storm advisory, to close out the year.
With a little old sigh, and a cigarette lit,
I took a deep breath, resisting a fit.
More rapid than eagles the phone alerts came,
And I cringed and I shouted and I called them all names.
Delays Newark! Delays Houston! Delays JFK and San Fran!
Delays, Atlanta! Delays Dulles! Delays LAX and Logan!

My blood pressure was up, I was climbing the walls;
I could hear stand-by now, through muffled airport calls.
Planes were all grounded, like before wild hurricanes,
Met with an obstacle, I sat down and ate candy canes.
Fed up with holiday travel, my nerves were askew,
We had gifts for Aunt Kathy (and her new beau, too).
And then, in a moment of panic I remembered:
Do we fly out next year or was it this December?
As I cradled my head, I saw a light and spun ’round,
Headlights in the driveway — our in-laws in town?

Dressed in faux fur, from head down to feet,
My fashion sense flinched, but my heart skipped a beat;
For a bundle of toys were flung on their back,
But more than just that — we didn’t have to pack!
My eyes how they watered! My spirits were merry!
(Mental note to fire my assistant, Jerry.)
His droll little mannerisms bothered me, oh!
But his scheduling skills were lacking more so.
The stump of a pen he held in his teeth
And the smoke on his clothes sometimes made me seethe;
But he has a good heart and he’s not all that smelly,
He does make me laugh and he stocks Jelly Belly.

With a crash came tumbling our Elf on the Shelf
And I snapped back to reality, in spite of myself;
An apologetic tail wag from the family dog Zed,
Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.
I turned off all my email, even my work,
And hugged my in-laws (so I wasn’t a jerk).
I set a reminder to book flights for next year,
And still couldn’t believe we’re hosting it here.
So I sprang into action, part relief and part Xanax,
And away my cares flew, along with my panics,
But I heard the weatherman exclaim before he was snowed out of sight,
‘Happy Christmas to all and to all a good night.’

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

Eight Holiday Travel Myths Debunked

Tips for Being a Good Holiday Houseguest