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hudson valley autumn leaves windowIn 5 Signs You’re Not a True Traveler, I declared that you should travel to experience new things, and that you shouldn’t always take the same vacations again and again. While I stand behind the notion that resort vacations alone aren’t traveling in the truest sense of the word, everyone should have one of those special places that take us away but make us feel at home, all at once.

Call it a weekend getaway, or call it the Griswold Family Summer Vacation — a good ol’ stand-by vacation spot, by any other name, is just as sweet.

When I was a child, my parents would wake me up in the pitch-darkness before dawn to jump into the car (in full pajama regalia, clutching stuffed compatriots) and head to Montauk, Long Island. We did this every summer, which was a tradition that I later found out my father had started in his mid-20′s. With a sense of legacy, and miles of beaches, village shopping centers, farmer’s markets, winding roads and harborside restaurants, there wasn’t any element that “got old.”

Photos: The 8 Best U.S. Road Trips

In college I moved to Poughkeepsie, New York, and within a short time I was initiated into the cult of leaf-praising, harvest-loving, pumpkin latte-drinking and apple-picking worshippers of fall. The Hudson Valley came alive during the autumn months, and I was intoxicated by the bucolic rolling hills, small-town festivals and flavors that marked the season.

It’s because of four years spent roaming the grounds of the Vanderbilt Mansion and strolling the streets of Rhinebeck that I became a fan of New York’s Hudson Valley for life. In that time I learned important distinctions of the area — most notably, do not confuse Dutchess County for “upstate” … it’s not the same thing!

Vote: Do You Enjoy Revisiting Familiar Places?

Every October, like clockwork, some inner leaves rustle and I’m drawn back to the familiar world of my old stomping grounds. What some people remember most about their time away at college is the parties or the sorority pals. But for me, that period of my life offered a lifelong gift: the opportunity to know a place and to revisit it with new eyes every time the autumn wind blows and the Valley comes calling.

Where’s your home-away hideaway? Is there a place that you visit continually and couldn’t imagine never seeing again? Post yours in the comments.

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

“What’s with all the pictures of your feet?” When I first came home from four months abroad, the podiatric photos were a bit puzzling to my parents — with so much scenery, why look down? But what began as a spur-of-the-moment shot evolved into a habit and, ultimately, a photo series encircling the globe.

Some of the pictures are more personal — in an image featuring my feet and a dirt path, only I know where I was when it was taken. I’m not huge into the “selfie” shot, so it’s become not only a hobby but also my own way of boasting that yes, I was physically THERE. Far from fetishizing, I think feet are symbolic of how far we’ve traveled (even if it wasn’t all on foot).

angkor wat feet

I came across this vibrant leaf while walking the paths between the Angkor Wat temples in Siem Reap, Cambodia. I didn’t know anyone in my tour group, and this shot is a personal reminder that beauty is all around and can sometimes feel extra special when discovered alone.

table mountain feet

My zebra-pattern sneakers felt appropriate in South Africa. Here I was taking a break from the line to board cable cars that would take us to the top of Table Mountain in Cape Town.

india beach feet

I found it difficult not to become completely immersed in India. I slept in a local hostel in Kanchipuram (in the southern state of Tamil Nadu) to wake up early and catch the sunrise on the beach there.

tokyo ice bar feet

On a quick trip to Tokyo while docked in Kobe, Japan, my girlfriends and I made an unexpected¬†(note the flip-flops) visit to the Absolut Ice Bar in the trendy downtown area of Roppongi. The ice made my shoes slick in the rain outside, so falling down the bar’s flight of stairs afterward is part of the memory.

cape may feet

On a weekend getaway in my home state of New Jersey, I couldn’t help but don saddle shoes to match the old-timey feel of historic 19th-century hotel Congress Hall, located in Cape May.

rainbow beach australia feet

Simply taking a break to enjoy the view. Rainbow Beach in Queensland, Australia, was one of the first stops I made on a coastal road trip with my best friend, who emigrated there 10 years ago.

Do you have a travel photo series of your own? Do you snap mid-jump in front of landmarks, wear the same hat in every vacation portrait or love capturing the same sites in every place you go? Send them to us: feedback@independenttraveler.com or comment below.

19 Tips for Better Travel Photos

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

map pinsYou have the list — maybe in your head, maybe written down — of all the places you’ve traveled to. Maybe you even have a map marked off somewhere, with little pushpins or computerized dots peppering the globe. You fly frequently and far, your passport has more stamps than the post office, and your international snow globe collection is reaching insurable proportions. But what some globetrotters and island-hoppers don’t realize is that there are miles between the distances you traverse and the experiences that shape you as a global citizen. The following are five signs you may be traveling more like a pedometer than a cultural sponge.

You visit a new place just to check it off a list.
I am guilty of this, though to be fair, the itinerary was not my own. My trip of a lifetime onboard a world cruise with Semester at Sea was fantastically jam-packed with datelines and diversity, but overwhelming in the sheer number of countries and cultures I had to digest over a limited period of time. While I don’t regret the experience, I still feel like I would need to go back to many of the places we docked to say I truly know what it’s like to visit there. Traveling to new places is an opportunity to immerse. This isn’t the Travel Channel; don’t get to know a place for an hour and then reach for the remote. Once you step foot on the soil of a new frontier, many would say it’s fair game to cross it off the omnipresent list. What would be better is to have a story to tell about that time you stopped in a local Tuscan market to buy groceries for a picnic lunch, but didn’t speak a lick of Italian, so you asked for Saltines, got sardines, but struck up a conversation with someone else in line and now they visit you every summer. Okay, sort of a romanticized version of experiential travel, but better than just getting back on the tour bus.

You never stray from familiar destinations.
You vacation two, three times a year, but it’s always to that resort you like in Mexico, where, like a Telemundo version of “Cheers,” everyone knows your name in a Spanish accent. While favorite locales are a good standby for getaways in a pinch, you can’t rack up too much travel cred if your only world view extends just south of the border … or along the same chain of islands. Travel should stretch the coordinates of comfort, and leave you exposed and vulnerable — but in that “It’s Christmas morning and I don’t know what is under the tree yet” sort of way. Venturing into the relative unknown is a spectacular way to accumulate those once-in-a-lifetime moments that can only be seized when you’re not seeking them. I would never have seen the sunrise on the beaches of India or ridden on the back of a moped in Vietnam if I didn’t throw a little caution to the wind and let curiosity outweigh fear.

16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

You expect the comforts of home … abroad.
While the “Americanization” of many cultures has led to expectations of Coca-Cola, Big Macs and a side of English in any corner of the world (and many times you will find them, believe me), creature comforts and familiarity should come as a surprise in a foreign land, not as an assumption. I can always forgive first-time travelers for some misgivings about varying international standards in sanitation, service and local cuisine. But if you’re asking for an exotic adventure to the Far East, don’t act blindsided when — gasp — people actually do eat all the things you’ve heard rumors about and, well, it’s not weird to them. Apart from culinary delicacies, many cultures don’t even partake in meals until what most Americans could consider bedtime. Harsh though it may seem, my best advice for anyone looking for all the conveniences or hair gels of home while traveling abroad is: Stay home.

You view your adventure from a bubble.
Most of your panoramas include a snoozing elderly man — not because he’s asleep on a stoop in a charming old Mediterranean village, but because most of your sightseeing has been through a tour bus window and he is sitting two rows in front. Don’t get me wrong — organized tours can be a great way to gain access to sites and information that would be difficult to arrange on your own. However, if the only people you speak to during your trip are your guide and your buddies on the bus, you’re missing out on a key aspect of the travel experience: the locals. More and more tour companies are infusing local interactions into their activities, including village visits and even meals in local homes. Or you can go off wandering on your own — befriend a shop owner or a student who speaks English if you’re a bit lost in translation. My best experiences abroad continue to be those made possible by the people indigenous to that area.

You refuse to change.
If you drink to have a good time, try a traditional caipirinha in Brazil, but don’t get so drunk that you forget what beach the bartender recommended. If you like to stay connected, create an Instagram or Vine of the Angkor Wat temple, but don’t stay so locked to a screen that you forget to look around and miss that awesome Cambodian monkey stealing a camera. Researchers say that the best time to quit smoking is while you’re on vacation because your habits and routine change so drastically that you’re essentially distracted. Embrace a change of pace during travel. Some are forced upon you — jet lag and time zone changes are unavoidable — but the “When in Rome” mentality is not for naught when traveling. New places are the ultimate atmosphere for trying new things and for imagining yourself apart from the items that typically comprise our every day. If you can’t let loose on the other side of the world, then what are you traveling for?

4 Tourists We DON’T Want to Travel With

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

hotel front deskWhen booking a special offer at a hotel, perhaps you’re looking for added value — an extra night, free breakfast or a bonus amenity. Maybe it’s a special occasion warranting rose petals and restaurant reservations, and you splurge for the upgrade. But maybe the offer has very little to do with value, convenience or even relevance to your life. If you happen to be a recent divorc√© named David with a book fetish, these packages just might be for you … or someone … somewhere (we’re not too sure).

Are You Named David? You Win!
Forget about the fine print — this deal is pretty straightforward. Anyone whose name does not begin with a “D” and end in “avid” need not apply. At the Hotel David in Florence (it’s all starting to make sense), you can save five percent on your stay if you share your namesake with the hotel. The promotion code at booking is — you guessed it — DAVID. The hotel claims to verify ID at check-in, so no David doubling!

“You Want What?” Bizarre Requests from Hotel Guests

Because All You Need to Be Taken Seriously Is a Blow Dryer
At Swissotel Lima, a pretty specific package is offered entitled Traveling Business Woman Room. In a time of tech-dependent, travel-savvy CEO’s and businesswomen, you might be justified in assuming that special amenities for this package would include high-speed Internet access, availability of conferencing equipment, maybe even a dry-cleaning service. But who needs high-falutin’ technology when you have hair? According to the description of package inclusions, all a modern-age woman needs to succeed is soft pillows, “exclusive” bathroom amenities and a blowout. Ace that next big meeting with softness and style!

Just Finished Paying Off Your Divorce Lawyer? Celebrate with a Vacation!
Wedged somewhere between Romantic Experience and Honeymoon Package, you can find a gem of a getaway called Divorced: Renewal and Freedom at Grand Velas Riviera Nayarit, an all-inclusive Puerto Vallarta resort in Mexico. Their prescription for the death of a marriage includes a blend of sun, sand, spa treatments and plenty of cocktails. Whether you left him, she left you or you mutually needed a solo trip south of the border, self-renewing rituals and a night on the town are on the menu.

16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

Who Knew Naughty Librarians Were So … Naughty?
When you spend an intimate stay at the Library Hotel in New York City, there’s no need to cast literary aspirations aside with your clothes. The hotel’s special offers currently feature a tame Alice in Wonderland package with afternoon tea, a jazzier Great Gatsby package including a night of roaring 20′s, and a package based on a very widely read ancient text: the Kama Sutra. Book the Erotica package and along with your guide to love you will receive an adults-only kit including body dust, massage oil, bubble bath and a feather tickler. Happy reading!

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

Stuttgart Library You’re in a new city and you have the near-unavoidable checklist of sights to see and things to do. Let’s review here: Museums, national parks, historic sites, art installations, so-and-so says this is the home of the world’s best wiener schnitzel — the list could seemingly go on forever.

And while many attractions are simply a case of beholding them (it’s free to stare at the Eiffel Tower but not to climb), entrance fees and related costs add up over the course of a vacation.

So what destination is available in just about every city you’ll visit, is a great porthole into local culture, offers spectacular people-watching as well as potentially free Internet access (handy in a foreign land) and is always free to visit? Libraries! I’m not just talking about Washington D.C.‘s Library of Congress (on many actual to-do lists), but any community building for book loan. You probably grew up visiting your own, from time to time, and never even considered it as a tourist attraction. Admittedly, that’s because some libraries are a tad more impressive than others — not in what they stand for, but perhaps how they stand (picture a repurposed industrial complex in Germany shaped like a Tetris block and filled with books).

Flavorwire recently put together a slideshow of 15 standout libraries from around the world — including one in Denmark featuring a giant mouth that recites poetry aloud, as well as reading nooks resembling birdcages in an eco-retreat at a Thai resort.

Editor’s Note: Slides one and nine represent private, home libraries and while awe-inspiring, are not recommended for your next sightseeing list!

What Not to Do in a New City

While attending college in Poughkeepsie, NY, I was drawn to study in the library of my friend’s alma mater, Vassar College — not for the millions of pages at hand, lying dormant in their many tomes, but for the Gothic architecture: the marble touches, hidden staircases and stained glass windows. This didn’t improve my grades as much as fuel my wandering imagination, and solidify my appreciation of libraries that appear as grand and mysterious as the knowledge within.

If the library you find doesn’t resemble a cathedral or a giraffe, don’t fret. The volumes you find abroad may not always be in your native tongue, but the communal library experience is guaranteed to be shared. Libraries are often used as a space for community announcements and events, so take advantage of tapping right into the source — find a bulletin board or events calendar (if you can read it) to get a pulse on the area.

12 Great Museums You’ve Never Heard Of

What’s the best library you ever visited at home or abroad? Share your experiences in the comments below!

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

stonerito elizabeths new orleansNew Orleans. Bourbon Street. The two pretty much go hand in hand even outside of Mardi Gras season. However, despite a single walk-through for the “experience” during my recent first trip to NOLA, I found the dodgy vibe wasn’t for me.

Thankfully, a few local friends gave me every traveler’s sought-after inside scoop. They took me to a few touristy spots like Cafe du Monde, which my taste buds found to be worth its salt (well, sugar) — but they knew to visit in the wee hours (early morning or late night) in order to avoid the lines. My idea of drinking in the street was fulfilled by ordering their cafe au lait in a keepsake mug and taking the rest to go. If you too prefer the slightly offbeat, consider the following haunts I was introduced to, by the people who live there.

Bywater: As Local as It Gets
If you lived here, you’d be home by now. At least that’s the wisdom of the hand-painted wooden sign that greets you along the waterway into this charming Crescent City neighborhood, one of very few in the Ninth Ward affected little by Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Bob, a local folk artist known for his signs including “Be Nice or Leave” (a favorite displayed in many local bars and establishments), has set up his art gallery and studio headquarters along Chartres in Bywater, and the location is hard to miss. Serving as the neighborhood’s unofficial mascot, the colorful yet gritty aesthetic of Dr. Bob’s art is indicative of the entire area.

As I wandered from brunch spot to brunch spot (brunch is a way of life in New Orleans), I became acquainted with the rainbow of houses and eclectic storefronts featuring vintage, antique and found objects. For every one I would pass or step into, there were two more I didn’t have time to discover. I suggest taking a day, or at least a whole afternoon, to wander this area and see what you discover for yourself.

For foodies, I recommend eating at Elizabeth’s. Its motto is “Real food, done real good,” and after eating there, I would overwhelmingly agree. This local establishment boasts no frills with plastic, cherry-dappled tablecloths and painted signs promoting their praline bacon (yes, you read that correctly … and that’s just an appetizer!). I went with the daily special — a stonerito — composed of eggs, sausage and bacon (yes, more bacon) in a French toast-battered wrap doused with powdered sugar, plus a side of fried green tomatoes with remoulade.

Our 5 Favorite New Orleans Hotels

Frenchmen Street
Known by residents as the “locals’ Bourbon Street,” Frenchmen offers shopping, bars, restaurants, music and culture — without the beads and rows of daiquiri machines. If you get to talking with any local shop owners, at some point they’ll ask you if you “know about Frenchmen.” A relative secret to most tourists, some of the best jazz venues run along this rue, from the Spotted Cat and Snug Harbor to Maison and Apple Barrel; they’re even happening on a Monday night. Sip your hurricane from a cup, not a plastic monstrosity, and immerse yourself in the music. For late-night, post-drink snacking, I suggest getting the tachos (nachos made with tater tots) at 13, a restaurant/bar.

Antiquing and Supermarkets
A bit daunted by the high-end Shops at Canal Place, unimpressed with River Walk and fizzled out after the same booths row after row in the French Market, I found that my favorite places to shop in New Orleans were the ever-present antique emporiums, artists’ collectives and the local supermarket. Rare Finds, near the market in the French Quarter, had a distinctive selection of antiques and memorabilia from absinthe spoons to vintage coins that served as old call girl coupons. I found a beautifully aged fleur de lis hook from the 1960′s for around $20.

On Royal Street there’s plenty of art at a variety of price points, mostly by local artists. For a glass of wine, a chat and a look around, try the Great Artists’ Collective. Finally, for those souvenirs to bring home to the family, from sauces, spices and snacks to beads and masks, try a suburban supermarket such as Rouse’s. Though food specialties and decorations change seasonally, it’s a definite bet for reasonably priced condiments and local seasonings if you have a foodie at home. Pick up some groceries for yourself too, like a case of seasonal Abita beer or a bag of Voodoo chips to enjoy back at the hotel.

See Our Complete New Orleans Travel Guide

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

If art, like music, is widely considered a universal language, then is street art universal slang?

Similar to the temporary nature of catchphrase fads, graffiti is a form of street art that speaks to the underground culture of the moment, is relevant to time and place, and may last just days or fade slowly over the years.

What I’ve found interesting in my travels is the persistence of this art form. From scribbles to symbols, tags to full-on murals, finding graffiti around the world is a personal reassurance that modern voices are thriving beneath a bridge in Budapest, at a bus stop on the remote island of Mauritius, and on every wall, bench and transformable crevice in between. Here’s a sampling:

australia graffiti

One of many pieces I found in a parking lot behind a main shopping street in Brisbane, Australia. Note how the environment (grass, electric wires, sign) seems to play into the art.


malaysia graffiti

An example of stencil graffiti. I saw this spray can-wielding penguin many times around Penang, Malaysia.


brazil graffiti

A mural depicting capoeira (Brazilian martial arts dance) and other cultural images along a cobblestone street in Salvador, in the Brazilian state of Bahia.


greece graffiti

Another stencil placed slyly on a wall in the Monastiraki-Psirri section of Athens, Greece.


cambodia graffiti

Scratchitti is a term used for graffiti etched into a wall or surface. I came across this haunting scratchitti while on a tour of the Killing Fields in the village of Choeung Ek, Cambodia.


new york graffiti

This image was part of an entire abandoned building alcove of wheatpaste graffiti (named for the paste used to adhere the image) on the Lower East Side of New York City. I use the term “was” because upon second visit, this piece and all of its counterparts had disappeared into temporality.

Have you snapped any shots of street art around the world? If so, send them our way: feedback@independenttraveler.com.

The Best 9 Cities to See Cool Public Art

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

childSometimes my mind wanders back to the haze of that careless week in the Caribbean. Floating through the hotel pool (my pink visor, my white tiger bathing suit). Throwing breakfast’s crumbs from the balcony to the birds in the bushes below. Posing near a hibiscus as big as my head. I spent part of my time with a vacationing Brit at the same hotel, and part of it with a local boy. I don’t quite remember either of their names, but the Brit spent most of his days in his underwear (the pictures are starting to fade, with curled-up edges, but they still make me smile).

Memories can be a trip of their own, especially first memories. My first memory was a travel memory — I was about 2 1/2 when my parents took me to Barbados.

Because I was an only child, my younger years were well documented. Paging through the photo albums, my memory has certainly been jogged (the school events, the neon bows). But from the best that I can judge, the clips that come to me from Barbados are the real thing, not a rendering. Surprisingly, my near-drowning experience in the hotel pool left less of an impression than the sweet, melting consolation of the Haagen-Dazs ice cream bar I was offered afterward. The only other sense I connect to this first international (and conscious) experience is the sound of steel drums. I can’t hear that light distinctive chime without being carried back. For many, it’s a call back to the tropical, the paradisiacal, the exotic; and for me, they are all of that melded with my first mysterious impressions of this earth.

Get Inspired: Around the World in 8 Amazing Videos

I’m sure it wasn’t my parents’ overarching plan to instill a lifelong wanderlust in me from 31 months, but it’s them I have to thank for exposing me to the world from such a young age, and continuing to support that plunge into the unknown. Whether the unknown is life or a new country, for me it all seems to meet at the same place in my memories.

What was your first travel memory? Don’t feel the need to stretch back to diapers! Crammed inside a hot car on a family roadtrip? Flying for a school competition? Shake up those reminiscences and share them in the comments below.

– written by Brittany Chrusciel