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Check out the stories you may have missed from around the travel-verse this week.

happy traveler in the mountains


This Travel Hacker Paid $400 for a $52,000 Round-the-World Trip — Here’s How He Did It
Business Insider profiles an ultra-creative traveler who stockpiled a million frequent flier miles via various travel credit cards and then used them to fund an extensive around-the-world vacation.

Why I Think Travel Is So Important Now
Wendy Perrin offers a moving essay on the importance of travel after the recent U.S. election, which has started a national discussion about which of us live in our own little “bubbles.” Perrin argues that all of us live in such bubbles, and that travel is a good way to break out of them and experience other perspectives.

Lessons from the Road: What It Was Like to Write the First Ever Rough Guide to India
Ever wondered what it’s like to write one of those authoritative guidebooks that help you get around a new place? Rough Guides interviews one of the authors of its first India guidebook in the early 1990s; he reveals the most memorable, strangest and scariest moments of his six months researching the book.

United Airlines Launches Basic Economy, Also Known as ‘Misery Class’
If you’re looking to save on a flight next year, you could consider United’s new Basic Economy class — but it comes with a price, reports the Independent. You won’t be able to choose your seat or bring any carry-on bags beyond a single small personal item.

Family Travel in a Time of Fear
This New York Times essay describes a family trip to France in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in Paris last year. Traveling helps us confront fear, the writer says, but it can’t protect us from the knowledge that there’s danger at home too.

The Persian Art of Etiquette
BBC investigates the Iranian notion of taarof, a complex system of etiquette that involves politeness and indirect communiation.

Most Millennials Put Travel Above Buying a Home or Paying Off Debt
Travel + Leisure reports on a new study by Airbnb and Gfk that found millennials (aged 18 – 35) would rather spend money on travel than they would on buying a home. In the U.S., only savings and investment funds ranked higher than travel among millennial priorities.

We love this colorful video from central Mexico, including footage from Guadalajara, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende.


12 Best Mexico Experiences
10 Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

— written by Sarah Schlichter

This weekend Americans and Canadians will “fall back,” turning their clocks back an hour to end Daylight Saving Time for another year. The U.S. and Canada are two countries out of dozens around the world that switch their clocks back and forth during the year to save energy and maximize sunlight. But which places don’t observe this practice? Below are a few you might want to visit.

st basils cathedral moscow


President Vladimir Putin moved Russia from year-round “summer time” to year-round “winter time” in 2014.

wailua falls kauai hawaii


Hawaii is one of two U.S. states that do not observe Daylight Saving Time. The other is Arizona (with the exception of the Navajo Nation).

baobab trees madagascar


Like most African nations, Madagascar does not observe Daylight Saving Time.

yaksaam temple south korea


South Korea hasn’t observed Daylight Saving Time since the 1980s, according to historical info at TimeandDate.com.

new delhi india


Most of the world’s major industrialized nations observe Daylight Saving Time, but India is a prominent exception.

tourist and llama at machu picchu


Peru hasn’t observed Daylight Saving Time since a couple of separate years in the 1990s, according to TimeandDate.com.

bottom bay barbados


Since 1980, Barbados has fallen in line with most other Caribbean islands, which stay in the same time zone all year round.

The World’s Most Beautiful Waterfalls
The 9 Best Places to Travel Alone

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out this week’s most compelling reads from around the travel world.

rome woman with view


Want to Retire in Your 30s and Travel The World? This Woman Did
We can’t all be wealthy lawyers raking in a six-figure salary, but this Forbes piece on a woman who retired in her 30s to wander the world is still inspiring. Thanks to a thrifty lifestyle and aggressive saving, she put away huge chunks of her salary and is now able to travel on just the dividends from her investments.

From Skyrises to Traffic Jams: Our Densely Populated Planet — in Pictures
This photo gallery from the Guardian offers an incredible view of the Earth’s people, animals and cityscapes.

Delta Flier Gets Entire 160-Seat Jet to Himself
Thanks to a delay and subsequent rebookings by other passengers, Steve Schneider found himself the only person on a Delta flight from New Orleans to Atlanta, reports USA Today. The flight took off despite its emptiness because the airline needed the plane in Atlanta for a departure the next day. All of this leaves us wondering: Why doesn’t this ever happen to us?

Inside the Fight to Save One of the World’s Most Dangerous Parks
This in-depth essay from National Geographic offers a sobering look at the struggle of conservationists to preserve Virunga National Park in war-torn Congo, home to more than half of the world’s remaining gorillas. It’s a dangerous job; 152 park rangers have been killed over the past two decades.

How ‘Brexit’ Will Affect Travel to Europe
The New York Times investigates the ramifications of the recent Brexit vote for American travelers, from cheaper airfares to potential impact on the U.S. travel industry.

What I Learned in Italy About Loving My Body
This thoughtful essay from AFAR details a woman’s journey from worrying about her weight every time she considers dessert to appreciating Italy’s culture and history by fully experiencing its cuisine.

U.S. Border Authority Seeks Travellers’ Social Media Details
Do you want the U.S. government reading your tweets? BBC reports that Customs and Border Protection (part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security) has proposed an update to visa waiver application forms that would ask applicants for their social media handles. The question would be optional.

This week’s video is a dreamy look at India’s people, places and food.


10 Best India Experiences
16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Catch up on the most interesting travel pieces you may have missed this week.

street in trinidad cuba


Please Stop Saying You Want to Go to Cuba Before It’s Ruined
In this incisive op-ed for Flood Magazine, a Cuban writer challenges the widespread view of Cuba as a romanticized, “stuck in time” destination that’s going to be ruined by a wave of mass tourism from the U.S. “What exactly do you think will ruin Cuba?” Natalie Morales writes. “Running water? Available food? … Access to proper healthcare?” It’s a must-read for anyone interested in visiting Cuba and seeing what it’s truly like to live there. (Warning: There’s some colorful language.)

Meet a Traveler: Michael Palin, National Treasure on Loan to the World
Lonely Planet interviews comedy legend and frequent traveler Michael Palin, who sounds off on his favorite places around the world, the best souvenir he ever brought home and his most challenging travel experience (which involved tainted camel liver).

Inside the Radical Airline Cabins of the Future
Vogue offers an intriguing look at how airplanes might be designed in the future. Windowless cabins? Stackable sleeping pods? A small viewing bubble on top of the plane? Welcome to a brave new world.

In Praise of Small-Town Travel
National Geographic celebrates the pleasures of visiting towns and villages rather than just big cities, including the slower rhythms of life and the chance to connect with local people. The writer also recommends her favorite small towns on each continent.

Doctors Share What Really Happens When There’s an Emergency Mid-Flight
Conde Nast Traveler interviewed several medical professionals to gather these stories of in-flight emergencies. One doctor delivered a baby; another couldn’t save a patient but used the tragedy to petition the U.S. government for a requirement that all planes have defibrillators and expanded medical kits. (Fortunately for all of us, he was successful.)

Shhh! Take a Peek at 15 of the World’s Most Exquisite Libraries
Book lovers will swoon over this CNN slideshow featuring photos of incredible libraries around the world, from Spain to South Korea.

The Abandoned Mansions of Billionaires
BBC Travel takes us into the fascinating Shekhawati region of Rajasthan, India, where a collection of opulent havelis (mansions) are falling into decay. Covered with magnificent frescoes, these buildings are only just starting to be preserved as museums or heritage hotels.

The Travel Industry Now Supports Nearly 10 Percent of World’s Jobs
Those of us who love to travel are in good company. Skift reports that more than a billion people traveled internationally last year, contributing to a tourism industry that provided jobs for one out of every 11 people worldwide.

Have a laugh over this week’s video from Jurys Inn, an Irish hotel chain, which has invented the “suvet” — a suit made of a hotel duvet. Looks pretty comfy!


— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the best travel content you may have missed this week.

mosque shiraz iran


Iraq? Crimea? Mali? Could These Be Travel Hotspots of the Future?
CNN offers an intriguing look at eight places that are currently troubled (for various reasons) but could turn into popular tourist destinations within a few decades.

Travelers Share Photos of the People They’ve Met Around the World
Mashable rounds up a few of the most incredible portraits submitted for Intrepid Travel’s “faces of the world” photography competition, capturing people in India, Cuba, Jordan, Papua New Guinea and more.

Inside the Very Real World of ‘Slum Tourism’
This thoughtful essay from Conde Nast Traveler explores the ethical ramifications of visiting underprivileged neighborhoods as a tourist. Yes, the tours educate travelers and often provide financial support to the communities affected, but do they exploit the misery of others?

Man with Muscular Dystrophy to Travel Through Europe as ‘Human Backpack’
In the “heartwarming” category comes this story from WNCN, a news station in North Carolina, about a man whose friends have volunteered to help him explore Europe by carrying him on their backs. Kevan Chandler weighs 65 pounds and has muscular dystrophy, which causes progressive muscle weakness. His friends hope to help him see sights that would be inaccessible to him in a wheelchair.

Obama Administration Loosens Cuba Rules in Advance of Historic Visit
It continues to get easier to visit Cuba, reports USA Today; President Obama’s latest changes mean that individual tourists can take educational “people to people” trips without being part of an organized tour.

This Could Be the World’s Largest Passport
The Smithsonian profiles a man who once had a passport with a whopping 331 pages. (His current one has 192.) Eric Oborski racked up some 15 million frequent flier miles and regularly visited embassies in Tokyo and Bangkok to add extra pages to his passport every time he ran out of space for new stamps.

Neighbors Now Have a Way to Complain About Bad Airbnb Hosts
Airbnb isn’t always popular with its hosts’ neighbors, who might not be thrilled by the revolving door of strangers staying next door. But Skift reports that the company is adding a new tool to allow neighbors to comment on guests’ behavior; this feedback will be reviewed by Airbnb’s customer support team.

This week’s video captures the colors, sounds and energy of India.


10 Best India Experiences
Airbnb and Beyond: Tips for Safe, Legal Vacation Rentals

— written by Sarah Schlichter

mazar i sharif mosqueEver dreamed about taking a trip to Afghanistan? How about Pakistan, Chechnya or Somalia? For travelers with a lust for adventure and a high tolerance for risk, there’s a company that will take you to these and many other seemingly dangerous places.

Untamed Borders was founded in 2006 by Kausar Hussain and James Wilcox, two adventure guides who met in the mountains of Afghanistan. Their mission is to offer “unparalleled access to some of the world’s most interesting and inaccessible places,” according to the company’s website.

Itineraries include an annual “Melons & Grapes — Grand Afghan Tour,” a two-week trip that combines a few days in Kabul with time in remote rural areas and ancient cities; a weeklong journey called “Chechnya, Dagestan and Russia’s Deep South,” which stops in the UNESCO World Heritage City of Derbent, a fortified Persian hill town; and a 16-day exploration of the tribal states in northeastern India. More active adventures are also available, including horse trekking in Tajikistan, glacier trekking in Pakistan and even running a marathon in Afghanistan.

The group size is always small — no more than 12 people, and often fewer — both for safety reasons and to keep the trips flexible. The company can also arrange custom trips for journalists, climbers, skiers, photographers or independent travelers interested in certain areas.

Of course, the big question is: Just how safe are these trips? The FAQ section on the company’s website notes that certain parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan are significantly more dangerous than others, and the trips are deliberately planned in the safer areas. In an article on CNN, the company notes that months of planning go into each trip, including plenty of brainstorming for worst-case scenarios.

The company relies on government warnings as well as first-hand info from local guides and contacts living in each country. On some trips, groups travel not only with guides but also with a security detail. All itineraries are subject to change if the situation on the ground becomes unstable, and guests must have travel insurance that covers them in the country they’re visiting. (Note: This may be difficult to find, but Untamed Borders can recommend a few specialty insurers.)

Such remote adventures don’t come cheap. Organized group trips start at 1,600 GBP per person (about $2,300 USD as of this writing), which includes accommodations, transportation, guides and breakfast. Travelers are responsible for flights, visas, insurance and other meals. If you’re traveling solo, you won’t need to pay a single supplement, but you will be expected to share a room with someone else in the group.

Travel Warnings and Advisories
18 Surefire Ways to Get Sick While Traveling

Would you consider a trip with Untamed Borders?

Every week in our “Spotlight on …” feature, we’ll highlight a different country around the world.

temple tamil nadu india


Population: 1.2 billion

Currency: Indian rupee

Phrase to Know: Aap kaise hain? (How are you?)

Fun Fact: It’s technically illegal for non-Indians to take rupees out of the country upon departure; if you don’t change it back into another currency, it may be confiscated.

We Recommend: Visit a tea estate in Darjeeling. You can pick your own leaves, learn about the production process and taste multiple varieties of the region’s famous tea.

10 Best India Experiences

Have you been to India? What was your favorite spot?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Sitting at my desk in New Jersey with the temperature hovering just below the freezing point, it’s hard to believe that spring has arrived. But spring it is, and people around the world will soon be celebrating the season of renewal.

Spring is a perfect time to travel in many destinations. Not only will you find smaller crowds and possibly even pay less (since high tourist season in many places doesn’t start until summer), but you may also stumble upon unique cultural celebrations such as the ones below.

Here are a few spring festivals from around the world to watch out for if you’re ever in the neighborhood around the time of the spring equinox.

las fallas festival


Las Fallas Festival: Valencia, Spain
A spring festival celebrating St. Joseph’s Day (March 19), the origins of Las Fallas go back in time to the days when wooden lamps, called parots, were needed to light carpenters’ workshops during the winter. As spring — and St. Joseph’s Day (the patron saint of carpenters) — neared, workers ceremoniously burned the parots, which were no longer needed for light. Over the centuries, the ceremony evolved into a five-day celebration involving the creation and eventual burning of ninots: huge, colorful cardboard, wood, papier-mache and plaster statues. The ninots remain on display for five days until March 19, when at midnight they are all set aflame, except for one chosen by popular vote and then exhibited at a local museum with others from years past.

Photos: 10 Best Spain Experiences

Whuppity Scoorie: Lanark, Scotland
The arrival of spring is celebrating in the small town of Lanark, Scotland, on March 1 with the delightfully named Whuppity Scoorie. During this celebration, local children gather at sunrise and run around the local church three times, making noise and swirling paper balls on strings around their heads. After the third lap, the kids race to gather up coins thrown by local assemblymen. No one is quite sure how the ritual began; the first written descriptions date back to the late 19th century.

junii brasovului


Junii Brasovului: Brasov, Romania
The “Youth of Brasov” festival is held on the Sunday after Eastern Orthodox Easter every year and involves seven groups of young men bedecked in Romanian folk costumes and uniforms riding colorfully decorated horses through the streets of the city. The parade also features traditional Romanian songs and dances, and culminates in each of the men throwing a scepter into the air to see who can hurl it the highest. The parade finally works its way up to a mountain field above the city where a community barbecue is held. The earliest written records of the ritual parade date back to 1728.

12 Places That Shine in Shoulder Season

Nowruz: Iran
Nowruz is celebrated on the first day of spring, which is also considered the beginning of the new year in the Persian calendar. It is a secular holiday of hope and rebirth, though its origins trace back to Zoroastrianism, which was the predominant religion of ancient Persia. It is celebrated in Iran, as well as Azerbaijan and most of the “stans” (Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan). Rituals typically involve building bonfires to jump over them.

holi india


Holi, India
Also known as the festival of colors, Holi is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated annually as the spring equinox approaches. The ceremony represents the arrival of spring, the end of winter and the victory of good over evil. It is a happy occasion marked by singing, dancing and a free-for-all of color, where participants do their best to paint others with dry colored powders and colored water. Holi dates back as far as the fourth century, though it may in fact be older.

What spring celebrations do you know of around the world?

— written by Dori Saltzman

Every so often, when I’m stuck at home between trips and need a little jolt of wanderlust, I wander over to Vimeo.com and go hunting for travel videos. If I can’t be exploring a new place right now, at least I can spend a few minutes living vicariously through someone else’s footage. And there’s no better inspiration for future trips!

For example, check out this dreamy time-lapse video of the midnight sun in Iceland — I guarantee you’ll want to go.



Also shot in Europe but with an entirely different mood and focus is “Barcelona GO!”, which takes viewers on a frenetic trip around this colorful Spanish city, from narrow medieval lanes to grand cathedrals and concert halls:



This video set in India is so vivid I can practically taste the curry:



I’m ending with my favorite — a gorgeous, contemplative look at Japan in wintertime. Keep an eye out for the Jigokudani snow monkeys.



3 Time-Lapse Videos to Get You in the Mood for Traveling

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two places with spiritual significance to their respective cultures.

Would you rather…

… trek to Lamayuru, a Buddhist monastery in the mountains of Ladakh, India, or …

lamayuru monastery india



… visit the ruins of Xunantunich in Belize?

xunantunich mayan ruins belize


India’s remote Lamayuru Monastery, once home to as many as 450 Buddhist monks, is best reached by a difficult but spectacular two-week trek through the mountains of Ladakh. (Banjara Camps & Retreats is one company that offers trips.) Easier to reach are the ruins of Xunantunich in Belize, accessible by car and various tours. The site includes the ruins of several temples dedicated to Mayan gods.

India Trip Reviews
Belize Trip Reviews

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

— written by Sarah Schlichter