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In the market for a new toiletry bag? ToiletTree Products, a company that sells bathroom and travel accessories, offers a couple of options worth considering.

toilettree bag with tsa bottles


The Toiletry Bag with 3 TSA Bottles weighs less than half a pound and has a hook you can use to hang it from your hotel or cruise ship’s bathroom door. The main compartment is separated into two parts by a mesh divider; here you’ll find three TSA-approved refillable bottles, with caps labeled as “conditioner,” “shampoo” and “body wash.” (Note that if you’re bringing these bottles in your carry-on on a flight, you’ll need to take them out of the toiletry bag and put them into a clear, quart-size, zip-top plastic bag with your other liquids and gels.)

There’s enough room in the main compartment for other items as well, such as makeup, toothpaste and a toothbrush. The bag also has two flat mesh pockets with zippers where you could slip things such as cotton swabs, feminine products, bandages, razor cartridges and the like. Once you’ve zipped the whole bag, there’s a handle at the top for easy carrying.

This bag sells for $18.95 at ToiletTree.com or at Amazon.com. It currently only comes in one color, navy blue.

toilettree bag


If you’re looking for a heavier-duty option, the Toiletry Bag with Sonic Travel Toothbrush is larger and sturdier, made of synthetic leather instead of polyester. Weighing in at 1.2 pounds, this bag has a main compartment large enough to store full-size toiletry bottles (shaving cream, sunblock, etc.) as well as a hairbrush, comb, large tube of toothpaste, etc.

On the bottom of the bag is a flatter compartment with elastic bands that hold three refillable TSA-size bottles — again marked for shampoo, conditioner and body wash — as well as a slot for the included travel-size sonic toothbrush. (Note that you’ll need to add your own AAA battery.) In this compartment is one wide, flat mesh pocket with a zipper.

This bag isn’t really designed to be used while hanging, so there’s no hook — but there is a handle at one end to carry it. It sells for $29.95 at ToiletTree.com or at Amazon.com. It’s currently only available in black.

Which one should you buy? For travelers looking to pack light and travel only with a carry-on, the smaller bag is a better bet. The larger bag is more suited to road trips or longer vacations where suitcase space and weight aren’t as much of a concern.

The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time
11 Versatile Travel Essentials That Do Double-Duty on the Road

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editorial Disclosure: Some products are sent to us free of charge to be considered for review. We choose products to review based on their relevance and usefulness to our readers. We offer our unbiased opinions and do not promise any editorial coverage, particularly positive reviews.

In early October, I embarked on a weeklong family vacation around the southwestern United States. This loaded itinerary promised hiking, rock climbing, swimming and a family reunion spread across five cities, three states and eight days. While I’m generally an efficient packer, I was having difficulty narrowing down my clothing options and keeping myself organized this time around.

ezpacking packing cubes


Normally, I’m skeptical of any packing cubes or aids. I’m a bare-bones traveler who has managed just fine with rolling, folding and cramming in the past. So when I was given the EzPacking Starter Set, a collection of four packing cubes in various sizes, I can’t say I expected much. If anything, I figured they’d complicate the packing process and add unnecessary bulk to my bag.

I was wrong. In fact, these little plastic cubes worked so well for me that I ordered another set shortly after this trip.

I used the large cube (which measures 16″ x 10.3″ x 4″) for casual wear, the medium (12″ x 10.3″ x 4″) for athletic clothes and running gear, the small bag (10.3″ x 6″ x 4″) for my bathing suits and intimates, and the extra-small bag (6″ x 6″ x 2.5″) for toiletries. When detouring to Page, Arizona for two days in the middle of the trip, I took the largest cube as an overnight duffel rather than lugging my full-size suitcase all over the Southwest.

Altogether these bags nestled nicely into my suitcase, maximized space and worked well with our multi-faceted and activity-intensive itinerary.

What We Liked: The EzPacking organizers are like the Mary Poppins bag of travel. These little things don’t look like much on the outside, but they can fit a lot. For instance, one of the larger bags comfortably held nine warm-weather outfits and a light jacket. (Disclaimer: I’m a petite, 5’0″ female.)

Beyond compactness, these bags are also lightweight and sturdy. They added very little extra weight to our luggage (20 ounces), and held their shape no matter how much stuff I crammed in around them. Unlike some other packing cubes, EzPacking organizers are transparent on four out of six sides, so it’s easy to see what you’ve packed where.

What We Didn’t Like: While the cubes are compact and convenient, they will take up the bulk of your bag. Because of this, I had difficulty squeezing in some last-minute souvenirs that were too delicate to fit elsewhere.

Another downside is that these cubes make it dangerously easy to overpack. I had to transfer several items from my suitcase to my carry-on just to keep my bag within the airline’s 50-pound limit.

Bottom Line: While a bit on the pricey side for a set of four (they retail for $48), the EzPacking organizers are a great asset for people with packing OCD, or travelers looking for extra organization.

EzPacking organizers can be ordered individually or purchased online in one of several bundles. They come in different colors and are TSA-approved (in fact, the smallest bag is perfect for TSA’s liquid and gel regulations). You can buy them on the EzPacking website or on Amazon.com.

Want a chance to win our gently used EzPacking Starter Set? We’re giving it away. Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the Starter Set. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time
11 Travel Essentials That Do Double Duty on the Road

— written by Christina Janansky

A few years ago, we conducted a Travel Pillow Challenge, road testing four unusual accessories to help you sleep better on long-haul flights. Back then, we thought some of the pillows were pretty weird looking — remember the giant inflatable apostrophe that looked more like a beauty pageant sash than a pillow?

But, oh my, the embarrassment factor has grown so much since then. Check out these awkward-looking travel pillows for flights.

ostrich pillow


Ostrich Pillow
Nothing says chic like a giant pillow that looks like a vintage deep sea diver helmet. At least the makers of the plush Ostrich Pillow have a sense of humor and play up the ridiculousness of this $99 sweat factory in photos on their website. I’ve never seen anyone wearing this on a flight, but I’d definitely tweet a pic of him or her if I did. Buy it at OstrichPillow.com or Amazon.

little cloud nine travel pillow


Little Cloud Nine Travel Pillow
I’m not sure if this blow-up device was invented by someone looking to catch a few Zs on an airplane or by a member of the Witness Protection Program. The device is said to provide stability to your neck and prevent your head from bobbing forward. It also makes the person in the middle seat so utterly afraid to ask if they could slide by to use the restroom that they’ll hold it in for the duration of your long-haul flight. Buy it at CloudNinePillow.com or at Amazon.

hoodiepillow


The HoodiePillow
Really want to convey the “don’t talk to me” message to your seatmate? Wrap this inflatable U-shaped pillow around your neck and draw up the attached hood. For maximum passive-aggressiveness, pull the drawstring so tight that only your nose and mouth appear. Buy it at HoodiePillow.com or Amazon.

skyrest travel pillow


SkyRest Travel Pillow
It’s like propping a recycling bin on your tray table! As large as many carry-on bags, this inflatable pillow supposedly counters the natural tendency of your head to fall forward when you sleep. It also requires that you ask the person next to you to hold your drink and your iPad and your snacks. Buy it at SkyRest.com or Amazon.

How to Sleep Better on Planes
11 Things Not to Do on a Plane

Would you try any of these pillows?

–written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

“Will we have to dress up?”

That’s the question — more like a whine — that I hear from my husband every time we plan a trip. Don will suit up when he needs to, but he associates jackets with work and clients and meetings, not relaxing and traveling.

Nonetheless, many vacations include at least one time to get fancy. Think cruises, weddings, a milestone dinner, a theater performance. But finding the space to pack dress clothes and keep them looking nice can be a problem when you’re looking to save space.

skyroll spinner


Enter the SkyRoll Spinner. This spinner suitcase meets most airlines’ carry-on size limits when packed (22 x 14 x 9 inches) but has the extra feature of a garment bag that clips onto the side and wraps around it. There’s also an included toiletries satchel. The inside of the garment bag has slots for folded dress shirts and ties, and the top of the carry-on has a compartment that the company designed to store the toiletry bag, but could also be a clever place to put shoes to keep them separate from your clothes. Seems like the perfect bag for the stylish traveler on the go. Right?

Well, maybe. The SkyRoll website notes that the bag is mostly designed for women, and that the size of the garment bag — 19 by 55 inches — makes it unsuitable for men’s jackets above size 40. My husband is 6’5″. While he liked the way the garment bag snapped onto the bag, it wasn’t wide enough for his dinner jacket, so he had to bend the edges to make it fit — not exactly what you want to keep it pressed. My dresses, which are smaller, were a better fit.

We discovered that the top compartment would work for shoes if your feet aren’t too big. (My women’s size 9.5 shoes went in fine; Don’s size 12 shoes were too large.) Don appreciated the thoughtful pockets in the garment bag, as well as the ease of rolling. If he didn’t already have a dopp kit, he would have gladly used the SkyRoll version, which comes with a hook to hang over the bathroom door.

What We Liked: The bag is ideal for the average-sized person who wants a comprehensive solution for a business trip or a short weekend escape. The top compartment itself is a joy for the organizer, with a glasses pocket and slots for cards and a pen in the top. If you don’t need the compartment, you can zip it out and use the extra space for the rest of your clothes.

What We Didn’t Like: If you’re tall with broad shoulders, this isn’t the bag you’re looking for.

Bottom Line: For most travelers, the SkyRoll Spinner solves the problem of keeping a jacket or dress neat and separate from the rest of your clothes. We’d recommend it for a shorter trip — say, a wedding weekend or a quick business trip — and for a shorter person.

Choosing the Right Travel Luggage

The SkyRoll Spinner weighs 10 pounds and sells for $299.99 on the SkyRoll website. The site also offers a carry-on with rolling (rather than spinning) wheels, a garment bag and a toiletry bag. For the next month, SkyRoll is offering a special coupon code for IndependentTraveler.com readers. Use IT916 to save 15 percent on any purchase through October 21, 2016.

Want a chance to win our gently used SkyRoll Spinner? We’re giving it away. Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, October 5, 2016. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the SkyRoll Spinner. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

The Ultimate Guide to Travel Packing

— written by Chris Gray Faust

As I prepared for an early-morning flight from Newark to New Orleans, I was excited to pack the JetComfy pillow, billed as the “world’s best travel pillow.” I hoped it would help me sleep through the entire flight.

jetcomfy pillow airplane sleep


JetComfy is a boxy pillow, built into a frame with an extendable pole so that you can bring the pillow closer to your head rather than the other way around. On the other end of the pole is a strap and clamp that you can use to attach the device to your seat’s arm.

The full pillow is fairly large, about half the size of a shoebox, so it’s not easy to take onto the plane if you’ve got a lot of carry-on luggage. I solved this issue by purchasing a bottle of water in an airport store and then putting the pillow into the plastic bag.

Here’s what I discovered about JetComfy:

It’s soft. I mean really soft. With two inches of memory foam, your face sinks gently into the pillow. The fleece-soft cover is also a pleasure to lay your head on.

It’s got phone chargers. Probably my favorite thing about JetComfy was the two USB chargers. I loved being able to power up my cell phone (even after I’d given up trying to sleep on the pillow). Note, however, that the chargers aren’t available with the standard JetComfy purchase; you’ll need to pony up an additional $29.99 for the Upgrade Kit, which includes two USB charging ports, an extra pillow cover and a stylus/pen/flashlight/pointer combo that fits into a slot in the base of the pillow.

It doesn’t angle well. Because it’s so soft, I couldn’t wait to rest my head on the JetComfy pillow and drift off into sleep. However, I found the ability (or lack thereof) to angle the pillow to be a problem. Though the pillow would start out angled, it would not remain so, and I’d wake up with a major crick in my neck. Because I was sitting in an aisle seat, there was nothing to lean the pillow up against to keep the angle in place. It’s possible a window seat would have solved this problem.

How to Sleep Better on Planes

It’s bulky. Not only is the JetComfy a bit cumbersome to carry around and onto the plane, but it also takes a bite out of the space surrounding your seat. I quickly realized that using the pillow on the aisle-side seat arm wouldn’t work, as I’d just keep getting bumped by anyone passing by. But using it on the other arm wasn’t much better. Thankfully I was sitting next to my spouse, but he complained about the pillow bumping into him. I don’t know how you’d be able to use it next to a stranger. (Again, the window seat probably would be okay.)

jetcomfy travel pillow


My overall impression of the JetComfy pillow was mixed. I did sleep on it, and I loved how soft it was, but the pain in my neck from waking up with my head completely tilted to the side was not something I’d care to experience again.

The JetComfy pillow costs $49.99 and can be purchased at the JetComfy website (use coupon code INDY for a 10 percent discount, good through December 31, 2016) or at Amazon.com.

Want to give it a try? We’re giving away a JetComfy pillow. Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, August 31, 2016. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the JetComfy pillow. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner of the JetComfy pillow is Jessica Chen. Congratulations! Stay tuned for further chances to win.

— written by Dori Saltzman

Check out the stories you may have missed around the travelverse this week.

vis-a-vis see through luggage


Traveling With a See-Through Suitcase Will Force You to Pack Neatly
Would you pay more than $550 for a suitcase that puts everything inside it on display? The makers of the Vis-a-Vis sure hope so, reports Gizmodo. This hard-shelled suitcase is completely transparent.

Behind the Scenes at a B&B: The Joys — and Challenges — of Being an Innkeeper
Ever dreamed of retiring to run a B&B out in the country? You might change your mind after reading this story, in which a Washington Post reporter shadows an innkeeper at a Pennsylvania B&B. She discovers a life of grocery store runs, room maintenance and endless guest requests — as well as moments when it’s all worth it.

23 Companies That Will Help You Travel the World for Free (and Maybe Even Pay You to Do It)
Forbes uncovers a few creative ways to take a free vacation, from house-sitting to helping foreigners practice their English.

Living Where the Sea Turns to Ice
BBC takes us on a moving journey to northwestern Greenland, where a reporter meets a 5-year-old named Dharma living in an orphanage in the village of Uummannaq. In a land of seemingly endless ice, the child and the reporter find a few brief moments of connection.

The NASA Space Treatment That Will Cure Your Seasickness
A doctor who regularly travels on cruises to the North and South Poles reveals to Conde Nast Traveler her choice for the best seasickness remedy: a prescription medication called promethazine. She also explains why the medicines we usually use for allergies also work for motion sickness.

Rescue Dog Becomes Instagram Sensation in L.A. for His Culinary Adventures
Lonely Planet wins the prize for this week’s most adorable story, about a rescue dog named Popeye the Foodie who’s been eating (or at least posing) his way around Los Angeles.

10 Travel Innovations That Make Globe-Hopping Better Than Ever
As much as we like to complain about the annoying parts of travel, this story from Bloomberg reminds us of the many nifty innovations that can really improve a trip, from smart bag tags that help prevent lost luggage to the rise of premium economy.

Get pumped up for the Olympic Games in Rio with this commercial from United, featuring members of the U.S. Olympic team.


12 Best Gadgets for Any Trip
Photos: 8 Best Greenland Experiences

— written by Sarah Schlichter

With germs lurking everywhere from airplane tray tables to ticketing machines at train stations, hand sanitizer is an essential part of any smart traveler’s bag of tricks. After all, you’re on vacation — who’s got time to get sick?

touch sanitizing germblock


I recently tested a new type of hand sanitizer called Touch, and it’s a little different than the usual antibacterial gel most of us pack for a trip. First off, it’s a mist rather than a gel or lotion, so it comes in a little aerosol spray can. Secondly, it doesn’t contain any alcohol, relying instead on a main ingredient called benzalkonium chloride to kill germs, bacteria, fungi and viruses. Finally, it’s formulated to stay on the hands rather than evaporating, protecting against germs for up to six hours.

Here’s what I liked and disliked about the product during our test on a recent trip to Europe.

The Good
We didn’t get sick: My husband and I used the spray at least every other day during our two-week trip, and we came home healthy. I admit that one trip isn’t exactly a scientific study, and it’s impossible to know whether we would’ve gotten sick if we hadn’t used Touch (or if we’d used a different hand sanitizer instead), but it’s still a good sign.

It’s a convenient travel size: Touch comes in a 1-ounce container that is easy to fit into a purse or daypack and will get through a security checkpoint in your quart-size bag of liquids and gels.

The long-lasting protection offers security: I liked that I didn’t need to keep reapplying Touch every hour or two.

The Bad
It’s not very discreet: One nice thing about using hand-sanitizing gel is that you can squeeze a dab of it into your hand without making noise. There’s no avoiding the sound of the aerosol spray when applying Touch — which made us a little a little self-conscious when we were trying to sanitize our hands in public places like a plane or a nice restaurant. (A Touch spokesperson tells us that spraying the product rather than rubbing it on helps ensure quicker and fuller coverage.)

It doesn’t necessarily leave hands feeling soft: Although Touch contains “skin-softening essential oils” (according to a product fact sheet), my husband and I didn’t love the way our hands felt immediately after spraying. It was an odd, almost powdery texture, similar to the way your hands might feel after pulling off a pair of latex gloves. Luckily, it didn’t last long.

It’s not available online: Touch is currently only available at Walgreens pharmacies. (Other sales channels are in the works.) The recommended retail price is $5.99 per 1-ounce container. Touch comes in four scents: ocean mist, tropical breeze, mint green tea aloe and unscented.

Want to give Touch a try? We’re giving away a sample of the mint green tea aloe product. Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Thursday, June 30. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the can of Touch. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Avoiding the Airplane Cold
18 Surefire Ways to Get Sick While Traveling

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Maps are a classic and captivating gift for avid travelers. Stylized maps as art are popular, as are classic, National Geographic-style maps tacked to an office wall or speckled with pins indicating where you’ve traveled.

older man on bench with map


But if you’re looking for something a little different for your travel-happy dad, here are eight non-traditional maps that would make great gifts for Father’s Day in just a few weeks:

Wall decor: Here’s a gift that provides a surprise twist: Etsy vendor Bombus cuts letters out of solid wood and then lacquers onto them maps of locations of your choosing. Select maps that have personal meaning to your Dad — he probably won’t notice them at first but then will likely be touched by the personalization. Cue the watery eyes.

Smartphone case: This iPhone holder is a beauty — it’s a thin polycarbonate case with a world map cover made of hand-finished, sustainably sourced inlaid wood.

Clock: Art vendor ArtPause puts a modern spin on the world map by rendering it in watercolor and then digitally manipulating the design. The result is a sleek, colorful map that looks vibrant against the white background of this circular clock.

Corkboard: This is a cool gift for an office: A cut-out corkboard in the shape of a map. It stretches more than three feet wide.

Luggage: If Dad’s always grabbing the wrong ubiquitous black bag from the luggage carousel, this three-piece set will make baggage claim a lot easier. The hard-sided cases are adorned in brightly colored, classic maps.

Cufflinks: Sterling silver-plated cufflinks depict a rendition of the historic “New and Accurate Map of the World,” which dates back to 1626 and is thought to be one of the first ones published in English.

Beer stein: Nice to pair with a six pack of brews from different countries, this hefty stein with a green world map and gold trim holds 22 ounces.

Tie: A Father’s Day shopping list wouldn’t be complete without a tie. This one isn’t a cliche, though: It’s a tasteful ivory-colored silk tie painted with a vintage map.

Oregami: A New Suitcase for Organized Travelers
The Ultimate Guide to Travel Packing

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

If you’re looking for a lightweight carry-on that you could also bring on a hike or take to the gym, consider the new High Sierra 22″ Duffel Backpack. As the name suggests, you can wear it on your back or carry it over your shoulder, making it a versatile option for various types of trips. The bag retails for $89.99.

We took the bag on a couple of quick holiday trips to test out its features — and here’s what we found.

high sierra 22 inch duffel backpack


The Good
It’s got plenty of compartments: Two side-loading compartments are ideal for stowing shoes separately from clothes, and you can tuck your phone or glasses case into the fleece-lined front pocket. An internal mesh pocket can hold dirty laundry. One caveat: It can be awkward to pack around items in the side compartments, which jut into the main section of the bag.

You can carry it multiple ways: You can grab the bag via sturdy handles on either side, or use the two straps on top to wear it as a backpack. You can also Velcro the top straps together to put the bag over your shoulder.

It’s lightweight and easy to stow: The bag weighs less than two pounds and, because it doesn’t have wheels or a rigid internal structure, is easy to stuff into the overhead compartment of a plane.

It’s water-resistant: When we poured water on the outside of the bag, the liquid immediately beaded up and ran off the side. The bag isn’t fully waterproof, so if you’re in a downpour it’ll eventually soak through, but your stuff should be protected well enough in light rain.

high sierra 22 inch duffel backpack


The Bad
It could use a longer shoulder strap: The company suggests that you can combine the grab handles into a single cross-body shoulder strap, but they’re not quite long enough to make this comfortable, especially for taller and/or larger travelers. A longer clip-on shoulder strap would have been a nice touch.

It doesn’t have wheels: If you’ve stuffed the bag full, it could get heavy during long treks between airport terminals. (Note that High Sierra offers a number of wheeled duffel bags and backpacks if you’re seeking those alternatives.)

It might be too big to carry on: The bag measures 22 x 14 x 12 inches, which exceeds some airlines’ carry-on restrictions. (American Airlines, for instance, limits carry-ons to a total of 45 inches, or 22 x 14 x 9.) That said, because the bag is so soft and flexible, you could easily squeeze it into the airline’s sizer if it’s not completely full.

There’s only one color: The bag is a new product and so far is only available in black with bright yellow-green trim.

Want to give this bag a try? We’re giving away our gently used black High Sierra 22″ Duffel Backpack! Just leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Monday, January 25, 2016. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the bag. This giveaway is open only to residents of the lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Susan David. Congratulations!

We received a free sample of this bag from High Sierra for the purpose of reviewing it and giving it away to a reader. All products are accepted with the understanding that we will review them in a way that honestly reflects our experience — good, bad or indifferent.

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Raise your hand if you’ve scrambled at the last minute to fill a Christmas stocking. We’re all usually focused on bigger gifts, leaving stockings to get stuffed from the mishmash of small, nominally priced items in the checkout aisle of a big-box retailer.

stocking beach holiday christmas


This Christmas, I’ll be filling stockings with as much care as I hang them. Here are indulgent and practical items under $20 that your travel-happy loved ones will appreciate (listed in order from least to most expensive):

Mini-funnels: How many times have you tried to fill those travel-sized bottles, only to end up with shampoo oozing down the side? These little funnels prevent gooey messes. Price: $1.71 for 10

Bottle-top humidifier: This is ideal for frequent hotel guests who find their rooms too dry. You simply screw the device onto a bottle of water and plug in using the included USB cord. Price: $5.81

Soft-sided bottle: Airports’ filtered water fountains and bottle refill stations are handy, but hard-sided plastic or aluminum water bottles don’t often fit well in the seatback pocket on an airplane. A soft-sided, pouch-like water bottle is a great solution. This one holds a liter of liquid. Price: $6.71

RFID-blocking passport wallet: Savvy hackers employ wireless devices to steal your identity by reading the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) info on your credit card and passport. Thwart their attempts by using a wallet that cannot be penetrated by wireless signals. This wallet stows cash, credit cards and a passport. Price: $9.99

Luxury-brand toiletries: Most of us either refill bottles with the shampoo and lotion brands we have at home or buy whatever’s cheapest at the local pharmacy. Why not indulge your loved one with a luxury brand, such as Bvlgari or Kiehl’s? Price: from $10

Lavender chamomile pillow mist: I use linen sprays like these to freshen up stale-smelling sheets, spritz worn clothing and help immortalize the memory of a trip, as I wrote about last year. This particular scent isn’t overpowering and could appeal to men and women. Price: $11.95

Sleep mask: Not only does this mask do superb work blocking out light, but it also contours around your eyes — you can actually still blink when it’s on — and doesn’t slip down your nose. Price: $12.95

Gadget organizer: This is the perfect companion for a long-haul flight: a nylon pouch with tons of tight elastic loops, pockets and pouches to keep all your little items organized. You’ll never have to root around on the floor for your lost pen or lip balm again. Price: $14.21

Neck rest: Unlike a standard neck pillow, the Releaf Neck Rest prevents you from becoming a sound-asleep bobblehead, because it supports your entire neck, not just the back and sides. Price: $17.61

Wine bottle protectors: The wine lover on your shopping list will appreciate these reusable bottle protectors, which wrap around your bottles and seal off potential leaks. Price: $19.97 for a set of three

Portable battery charger: Before you purchase a portable battery charger as a gift, make sure you know what brand of smartphone your loved one owns. This sleek, nine-ounce model works on iPhones, Samsung Galaxy phones, Sony smartphones and other devices. Price: $19.99

For more ideas, check out 10 Unexpected Holiday Travel Gifts and 8 Travel-Themed Holiday Gift Ideas for the Home.

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma