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Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two mouth-watering seasonal beverages.

Would you rather …

… guzzle gluhwein at a Christmas market in Germany, or …

gluhwein mulled wine christmas



… sip warm salep in Turkey?

salep sahlep sahlab turkey


Gluhwein, that delicious mulled wine popular at Christmas markets in German-speaking countries, is spiced with cinnamon, cloves and citrus fruit. Salep (also spelled “sahlep” or “sahlab,” depending on where you’re drinking it) is a popular drink served during the colder months in Turkey, Egypt, Greece and other parts of the former Ottoman Empire. In Turkey the drink is thickened with flour made from the tubers of wild orchids and mixed with warm milk, cinnamon, ginger and/or nutmeg.

12 International Foods to Try Before You Die

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two dining options.

When traveling, would you rather…

… eat at a fine restaurant with a Michelin star, or …

fine dining



… get something fresh and cheap from a local street market?

street food noodles


Most big cities have a range of dining options for every taste and budget. Are you the type to make reservations a month in advance for the fanciest spot in town, or do you prefer to eat your way through the food stalls in the local street market?

Beyond Restaurants: 8 Ways to Savor a Local Food Scene

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

On your next trip, you could go out for a nice, quiet dinner — or you could eat your meal behind bars … or underwater … or in a fancy restroom! At these one-of-a-kind restaurants, it’s not just about the food. In fact, meals take the back burner while ambience and unique entertainment steal the show.

ithaa underwater restaurant maldivesIthaa, Rangali Island, Maldives
Part of Conrad Maldives Rangali Island, this all-glass restaurant is situated underwater, some 16 feet below the surface of the ocean. It features 180-degree views in a small dining room that seats about 12, who are lucky enough to watch sea creatures sailing by as they dine on modern European cuisine.

Food and Travel: The Ultimate Guide


alcatraz er tokyoAlacatraz E.R., Tokyo, Japan
Not that you ever wanted to dine behind bars … but Alcatraz E.R. offers the chance in blood- and body part-splattered jail cells (fake, of course). Guests sip cocktails out of test tubes and mannequin heads, and during meals, you might find the lights going out as “escapees” enter the prison cells.

Photos: 12 Best Japan Experiences


supperclub amsterdamSupperclub, Amsterdam, Netherlands
So maybe you don’t want to dine behind bars, but who doesn’t want to eat in bed? At Supperclub, four-course meals and cocktails are served on mattresses, housed in a dimly lit room. Guests also enjoy live, often interactive entertainment such as burlesque, vaudeville, cabaret and freak shows, along with music and art.

Photos: Best Netherlands Experiences


modern toilet taipeiModern Toilet, Taipei, Taiwan
Normally, you want to avoid a trip to the bathroom following a meal, but at this restaurant, you’ll practically eat in the restroom. Patrons sit on toilets and at tables that resemble bathroom sinks. Meanwhile, more toilets adorn the walls. Drinks are served in glasses that look like urinals, and food is delivered in miniature porcelain thrones (and chocolate ice cream is on the menu).

7 Strange Foods from Around the World

le refuge des fonduesLe Refuge des Fondues, Paris, France
This tourist spot has gained attention for the way it serves wine: in baby bottles. It’s tiny, too — so tiny, in fact, that you might have to jump over a table to access seats along the wall (diners sit together at two long tables). Graffiti is encouraged (the walls are covered with it), and delicious fondue is served.

Photos: 12 Best France Experiences


pink door seattleThe Pink Door, Seattle, U.S.A.
Hidden in an alley at Pike Place Market, the Pink Door isn’t just the name of the restaurant; it’s what you’ll need to search for to find the place (there aren’t any signs). Once inside, you’ll walk down a set of stairs — the restaurant is situated underground — to a small room lit by candles. Delicious Italian fare is served, but the real draw is the entertainment. A trapeze artist twirls and spins overhead on Sundays and Mondays, while Saturdays feature burlesque and cabaret shows.

– written by Amanda Geronikos

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two destinations offering delicious fried dishes.

Would you rather…

… eat fresh-caught fish on a beach in Trinidad, or …

fried fish maracas beach trinidad



… nosh on falafel on the streets of Cairo, Egypt?

falafel egypt


As in much of the Caribbean, fried fish is a popular dish on the islands of Trinidad and Tobago. In fact, there’s even an annual Trinidad Fish Festival featuring live music, an artisan street fair and, of course, plenty of fresh-caught fish. Falafel, a ball of deep-fried chickpeas or fava beans, is a common street food across the Middle East; it’s thought to have originated in Egypt, where you can still grab one of these tasty snacks wrapped in pita bread and garnished with tahini sauce.

Food and Travel: The Ultimate Guide

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Would you pay $1,013 for a salad? How about $2,700 for sushi?

These exorbitant dishes and many others are on a “menu” of the world’s most expensive food, put together by Chris Sibbet of FinancesOnline.com. Sibbet scoured the globe to find lavish offerings like the aforementioned salad, which is made of “beluga caviar, grated truffle, potatoes with gold leaf, Cornish crab and lobster and 30-year-old balsamic vinegar” and can be ordered at the Hempel Hotel in London.

If you’d rather drop a few grand on sushi, head to Angelito Areneta’s Golden Sushi in Manila, where the fish is wrapped in 24-carat gold and crowned with three pearls.

The total cost for all the decadent dishes rounded up by Sibbet (many of which were created as fundraisers for charity) adds up to a whopping $95,065. Bon apetit!

The Most Expensive Dishes In The World: How To Plan The Pricest Meal Ever

Republished from alternatives.financesonline.com — Published by Chris Sibbet — See our Vimeo

International Foods to Try Before You Die
12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Summer heat got you down? We’re cooling off by imagining ourselves sinking our teeth into a few of the world’s sweetest, coolest desserts. Check out our list below and then add your favorites in the comments!

gelato italy ice cream
Gelato, Italy

Italy‘s famously smooth, delicious ice cream tops our list. Our flavor of choice is coconut — what’s yours?

maple taffy
Maple Taffy, Canada

Few desserts are more chill than this dessert, which involves pouring maple syrup on snow; it’s popular in Quebec and other parts of eastern Canada.

mochi ice cream japan
Mochi Ice Cream, Japan

This treat from Japan is like two desserts in one: a sticky-sweet rice cake with ice cream tucked inside.

mango lassi
Mango Lassi, India

This sweet drink made with mango, yogurt and sugar is a favorite on hot days in India.

12 International Foods to Try Before You Die

What’s your favorite cool, refreshing dessert?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two delicious light bites.

Would you rather…

… nibble on fresh spring rolls in Vietnam, or …

spring rolls vietnam



… nosh on tapas in Spain?

spanish tapas spain


Wrapped in delicate rice paper and stuffed with a tasty mix of lettuce, cucumber, carrot, daikon and either pork or shrimp, spring rolls are a must-try when visiting Vietnam or other Southeast Asian countries. Meanwhile, tapas encompass a range of bite-size appetizers or snacks in Spain, ranging from fried squid to cured cheese topped with anchovies.

12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies
Beyond Restaurants: 8 Ways to Savor a Local Food Scene

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two scrumptious sweets.

Would you rather…

… try baklava in Turkey, or …

baklava turkey



… enjoy a mooncake in China?

mooncake china tea


Baklava is a popular dessert in Turkey, Greece, and other countries in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Phyllo dough is stuffed with chopped nuts and drizzled with honey. Mooncakes are traditionally eaten during China’s Mid-Autumn Festival, accompanied by a cup of tea. They’re made of lotus seed or sweet bean paste, along with lard and egg yolk — a delicious but calorie-rich treat.

Tell us your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

paris boxAdvertised as “the first gourmet tour around the world delivered to your door,” Try the World provides a gift box containing a quick taste of a different nation’s palate pleasers, every two months.

Founded by a Russian-born New York foodie and a French globetrotter, the company aims to offer not only premium artisanal and international food products, but also a more immersive experience including regional art and music. This is accomplished by a number of postcards included in your box that provide goodies such as poems, music playlists or lists of top local films.

We received a preview of the Paris Box (which will be sent out on November 28), and found postcards tucked inside that explained the origin of our packets of Les Confitures a l’Ancienne powdered dark chocolate (blended with Bourbon vanilla) for hot cocoa, the tiny Alain Milliat jams in Bergeron apricot or wild blueberry with a wildflower honey, and exotic Le Palais des Thes tea bags that meld French tea culture with those of Turkey and Tibet. These three companies alone represent the northwest (Maurencourt), central (Paris) and southeast (Orlienas) regions of France. Additional products you will find in your Paris Box are salted butter caramels by Le Petit Saunier, Chabert & Guillot nougat bars, Sel de Guerande fleur de sel from Brittany and chestnut cream by Clement Faugier.

Along with the international flavors you’ll sample in these high-end (but meagerly portioned) delicacies, you can accompany your cup of tea with the playlist provided (for Paris, it includes the likes of Satie, Gainsbourg and Gall) and read aloud “Exotic Perfume,” a poem by Charles Baudelaire (in English or in French) over chocolate.

12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies

Try the World is a subscription service, which charges $45 per box every two months. It’s a little pricey considering that the items included are close to sample size, but when you look at the variety and quality of the handpicked food items and the well-designed postcards, the box is a neat way to experience that country’s cultural scene from your living room couch. Compared to the price of sending flowers or a fruit basket, I would much rather receive something worldly yet personalized. Subscribing for a full year (six boxes) gives you something to look forward to, but my only complaint would be that the contents of the box don’t seem like they would sustain my global culinary whims over a two-month period.

The Tokyo box ships at the end of January, and the Rio de Janeiro box ships at the end of March. Future box themes have not been announced.

12 International Foods to Try Before You Die

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

supermarket aislesWe all know you can learn a lot about a person from his work desk, her reading list or even their medicine cabinet. But can you apply similar rules to a country and its people?

Sure. Just check out the extensive frozen food aisles in most U.S. supermarkets, and you’ll quickly realize how much most Americans love to save time by relying on easy, convenient, premade food. So what can supermarkets tell you about people in other countries?

Carolyn Spencer Brown, Editor-in-Chief of Cruise Critic and frequent contributor to IndependentTraveler.com, was surprised to learn that not all Italians spend hours making pasta by hand.

“The vast array of premade pasta at a Tuscany co-op certainly disabused us of the notion that all Italian hand-make theirs,” she wrote on IndependentTraveler.com’s Facebook page.

Eating Well and Staying Active While Traveling

I discovered that Romanians are not above making fun of their vampiric association when I found a potato chip dipping sauce called “Let’s Dip Dracula.”

When we asked our readers on Facebook what they’ve learned about a country on their foreign supermarket forays, people were quick to chime in.

Sheila of Sheila’s Travel Page had a similar epiphany to Brown’s. “I assumed that everywhere tropical used fresh squeezed juice, but in the grocery store there was a whole aisle of Tetra Pak juice. People living in the tropics don’t have time to squeeze juice, just like me!”

How to Save Money on Food When You Travel

And Tamara M. Goldstein wrote that visiting supermarkets abroad reminds her that most people in the world don’t have huge refrigerators. “In the USA we have so many sizes of one product; however, in most European countries there is one, maybe two sizes of a product,” she wrote. “They don’t have gigantic refrigerators like we have nor do they have walls filled with cupboards.”

Do you visit supermarkets in the countries you visit? What have you noticed?

– written by Dori Saltzman