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Check out the week’s most interesting stories from around the travel world.

airplane food

“Nightmarish School-Dinner Fare”: Airline Food Taste Test
The Guardian puts airline food to the test with deliciously scathing results. Of one EasyJet sandwich, the author writes, “It is a bready Alcatraz incarcerating one slim slice of cheddar that has briefly been dabbed with ‘seasoned mayo’ (presumably seasoned with air, for all the flavour it adds) and a ‘mixed-leaf salad’ whose sparse scattering of shrivelled leaves looks more like some foliage has blown in through the window during prep than a deliberate garnish.”

Is This the Future of Hands-Free Luggage?
CNN profiles a bizarre new travel accessory: My Hitch, a gadget that allows you to hook your suitcase to your waistband so it will follow you wherever you go. Because every traveler needs a luggage tail!

Travel 3,000 Miles Through China’s Wondrous Wild West
A National Geographic photographer describes the experience of riding a train for 52 hours across China with his family. (Don’t forget to click through the gallery at the top of the story to see his powerful images.)

The Entire Continent of Australia Has Moved Five Feet in 22 Years
Thanks to its position atop an active tectonic plate, Australia has moved about five feet to the north over the last couple of decades. Though that may not sound like much, Conde Nast Traveler notes that such shifts can have a meaningful effect on devices that use GPS technology.

Tourists Blame Google Maps for Sending Them Into Venice in a Car
Speaking of GPS, Travel + Leisure reports on a couple of tourists in a rental car who blundered into a pedestrian-only section of Venice, nearly hitting a bystander along the Grand Canal. Their excuse? They were following Google Maps.

A Cheese Made from … Donkey Milk?
A BBC reporter journeys to Serbia to taste the world’s most expensive cheese, made from the milk of local donkeys. It’s said to slow the aging process and boost immunity and virility.

This week’s video is a tearjerker, featuring an Iowa choir singing “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” on a plane in honor of a WWII soldier, whose remains were being escorted on the flight from Germany to Atlanta.

Lost in Venice: One Wrong Turn and You May Never Leave
11 Things Not to Do on a Plane

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed around the travelverse this week.

vis-a-vis see through luggage

Traveling With a See-Through Suitcase Will Force You to Pack Neatly
Would you pay more than $550 for a suitcase that puts everything inside it on display? The makers of the Vis-a-Vis sure hope so, reports Gizmodo. This hard-shelled suitcase is completely transparent.

Behind the Scenes at a B&B: The Joys — and Challenges — of Being an Innkeeper
Ever dreamed of retiring to run a B&B out in the country? You might change your mind after reading this story, in which a Washington Post reporter shadows an innkeeper at a Pennsylvania B&B. She discovers a life of grocery store runs, room maintenance and endless guest requests — as well as moments when it’s all worth it.

23 Companies That Will Help You Travel the World for Free (and Maybe Even Pay You to Do It)
Forbes uncovers a few creative ways to take a free vacation, from house-sitting to helping foreigners practice their English.

Living Where the Sea Turns to Ice
BBC takes us on a moving journey to northwestern Greenland, where a reporter meets a 5-year-old named Dharma living in an orphanage in the village of Uummannaq. In a land of seemingly endless ice, the child and the reporter find a few brief moments of connection.

The NASA Space Treatment That Will Cure Your Seasickness
A doctor who regularly travels on cruises to the North and South Poles reveals to Conde Nast Traveler her choice for the best seasickness remedy: a prescription medication called promethazine. She also explains why the medicines we usually use for allergies also work for motion sickness.

Rescue Dog Becomes Instagram Sensation in L.A. for His Culinary Adventures
Lonely Planet wins the prize for this week’s most adorable story, about a rescue dog named Popeye the Foodie who’s been eating (or at least posing) his way around Los Angeles.

10 Travel Innovations That Make Globe-Hopping Better Than Ever
As much as we like to complain about the annoying parts of travel, this story from Bloomberg reminds us of the many nifty innovations that can really improve a trip, from smart bag tags that help prevent lost luggage to the rise of premium economy.

Get pumped up for the Olympic Games in Rio with this commercial from United, featuring members of the U.S. Olympic team.

12 Best Gadgets for Any Trip
Photos: 8 Best Greenland Experiences

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out our favorite reads from around the travel world this week.

ani ruins turkey

UNESCO Just Added 9 New World Heritage Sites to Your Travel Bucket List
Mashable reports on the nine sites recently recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including rock art in China, an ancient walled city in Greece and temple ruins in Micronesia.

15 Phone Hacks Every Traveler Needs to Know
BuzzFeed offers useful tips for anyone who wants to use their phone in a foreign country, including how to protect yourself if you lose it and which apps offer messaging through Wi-Fi (so you can stay in touch without burning through data).

The Nation That Hates to Be Late
BBC investigates Switzerland’s reputation for efficiency and punctuality, values that for the Swiss represent “a source of deep contentment” but can sometimes be irritating to less organized visitors.

For Want of a Coffeepot, Your Flight Is Delayed
The New York Times examines a surprising source of flight delays: a non-functional coffee maker. It’s not all the potentially angry caffeine addicts that could keep your plane on the tarmac, but rather that a malfunction in the coffee maker could be a symptom of a larger problem such as an electrical issue.

The Secrets of the World’s Best Travel Photographer
The Telegraph interviews Marsel van Oosten, a Dutchman who just won the Travel Photographer of the Year competition. He lists Namibia as one of his favorite places to take photos and stresses the importance of finding unique places and perspectives to shoot.

Fair Warning: Don’t Visit This Country This Summer
A writer for the Business Journals examines how other countries’ governments warn their citizens against traveling to the U.S., citing America’s “racial tensions,” high medical costs and mass shootings.

Okinawa: Secrets for a Long and Happy Life
Lonely Planet journeys to Okinawa to try to discover why these Japanese islands are home to more centenarians than anywhere else on Earth.

Will [Your] Next Hotel Room Be Delivered by Drone?
CNN reports on an intriguing new concept: a self-sustaining hotel room that can be dropped off by a drone anywhere in the world. The idea, known as Driftscape, is one of the finalists for the 2016 Radical Innovation Award.

We always love Air New Zealand’s in-flight safety videos (don’t miss its “Men in Black” spoof from last year), and the latest one is no exception. Watch Anna Faris and Rhys Darby in a madcap romp through various Hollywood movie tropes.

Quiz: How Well Do You Know Travel Movies?
9 Places You Haven’t Visited — But Should

— written by Sarah Schlichter

The European Commission has delayed making a decision about whether to halt the program that allows American and Canadian tourists to go to Europe without visas.

visa schengen

The commission originally said it would decide in mid-July about whether to suspend the Schengen visa waiver program for citizens of the United States, Canada and Brunei. But the commission’s leaders decided last week to delay a decision until the fall because talks with the U.S. and Canada are still in progress.

As we reported in April, the Schengen visa program allows Americans, Canadians and the citizens of more than two dozen European countries to travel to and between countries in Europe without obtaining a visa in advance.

A key principle of the program is visa waiver reciprocity, but the United States, Canada and Brunei were not abiding by that. The U.S. government requires the citizens of five European countries (Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Cyprus and Croatia) to obtain an advance visa, while Canada mandates such visas for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens. Brunei formerly required Croatians to get them.

A recent statement from the European Commission notes that Brunei has lifted the visa requirement for Croatian citizens. However, there’s been no meaningful progress on full reciprocity with Canada or the U.S. Talks with Canada will continue at a summit in late October, while U.S. government officials indicated to the E.U. that there would be “little chance of evolution” on the subject before the presidential and Congressional elections in November.

The E.U. still could decide not to suspend the program at all, according to the Wall Street Journal. If the E.U. decides there would be significant negative impacts on the European countries and its citizens, then it can keep the Schengen program alive without full reciprocity. The European Commission did acknowledge that the number of U.S. and Canadian visitors to Europe would decrease if visas were required, leading to “a considerable economic loss.”

Stay tuned for further updates.

Quiz: Which European City Are You?
Planning a Trip to Europe: Your 10-Step Guide

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Catch up on the travel stories you may have missed.

woman sleeping at airport

Why Your Eastward Jet Lag Is Worse, According to Math
CNN reports on a new math model that explains why many travelers have more trouble with jet lag when traveling east than they do going west.

Your Awkward Family Travel Photos
Have a laugh over this slideshow from the New York Times featuring bad ’80s hair, goofy poses and kids having temper tantrums — all the stuff great family trips are made of.

How a Hidden Noodle Shop Tour Helps Street Youth in Vietnam
National Geographic reports on a street food tour with a heart. The Oodles of Noodles tour in Hoi An, Vietnam, is led by local street kids being trained to work in the hospitality industry.

Why I Love Being a Pilot
A pilot tells the Guardian about his experience of “place lag,” which he describes as the feeling of being immersed in one destination and then, after a few hours on a plane, having to suddenly adapt to a new place and culture.

The Ultimate Berlin Street Food
BBC Travel investigates the history and cultural significance of currywurst, which is said to have been invented in 1949 by a bored snack bar owner in West Berlin.

5 Changes That Have Made Flying Safer
Conde Nast Traveler highlights just how safe it is to fly these days — there were only 136 fatalities last year out of 3.5 billion fliers — and explains the policies and technology that have led us to this point.

Google’s Mobile Service Gets International Upgrade
Travelers who rely on their phones abroad should check out this article from Travel + Leisure, which describes improvements to Google’s Project Fi mobile service — including high data speeds in more than 100 countries. (One important caveat: So far the service is only available for Google’s Nexus phones.)

CT Scanners Could End the Liquid Ban, and They’re Coming to Phoenix This Year
Airline blogger Cranky Flier reports that American Airlines will be testing out CT scanners at Phoenix Sky Harbor International this year. Such technology is currently in use for checked bags, but if it comes to the airport security checkpoint it could conceivably speed up the line and possibly even keep us from having to pull out our bags of liquids and gels. Here’s hoping…

This week’s video is a twofer from Visit Norway, which has introduced a new campaign called Sheep with a View. First up is the video introducing the project, while the second one is a behind-the-scenes look that’s even cuter.

10 Best Norway Experiences
How to Fight Jet Lag

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Catch up on what you might have missed in the travel world this week.

men in business class

Meet the Husbands Who Fly First Class — While Their Wives Travel in Economy
Would you be okay sitting in cattle class while your spouse chills out in first or business? The Telegraph profiles a number of couples that regularly fly separately, with the husband at the front of the plane and the wife in the back. “In my opinion, everyone should travel this way. I think first-class is really rather wonderful — the only way to fly,” says one charming husband, who might feel that everyone should fly in first but won’t pay for his wife to do so.

Travel Photographer of the Year Contest: 2016 Winners
Feast your eyes on these stunning shots submitted to this year’s National Geographic Photographer of the Year Contest, covering destinations from Varanasi, India to Chile’s Atacama Desert.

U.S. Approves 8 Airlines to Fly to Havana Beginning This Fall
USA Today reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation has tentatively approved flights to Havana, Cuba, aboard eight American airlines. If these schedules are given final approval after the upcoming comment period, you’ll soon be able to fly to the Cuban capital from Los Angeles, Miami, Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Tampa, Houston and Newark.

A Longtime Concierge on Hotel Tipping, Online Reviews and More
Conde Nast Traveler interviews a head concierge at the Stafford, a five-star hotel in London, and gets his perspective on the importance of responding to online reviews, the difference in tipping between the U.S. and the U.K., and his number one tip for hotel guests.

Shrinking Pool of Future Pilots Keeps Major Airlines on Edge
Bloomberg reports on an alarming problem in the airline industry: not enough people to fly the planes. Within 10 years, U.S. airlines are expected to be understaffed by some 15,000 pilots, thanks to many older captains retiring and not enough people interested in taking up flying as a career.

Cheryl Strayed: A Close Encounter at Badlands
“Wild” author Cheryl Strayed writes vividly in the New York Times about a 1994 encounter with a bison while she was camping at Badlands National Park.

19 Dreamy Pictures of Croatia
Everyone needs a little eye candy. Indulge yourself with this photo essay from Rough Guides featuring swoon-worthy shots of Croatia.

This week’s featured travel video takes the viewer on a journey through the colorful souks and remote deserts of Morocco.

11 Best Morocco Experiences
12 Travel Photography Mistakes to Avoid

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out this week’s most compelling reads from around the travel world.

rome woman with view

Want to Retire in Your 30s and Travel The World? This Woman Did
We can’t all be wealthy lawyers raking in a six-figure salary, but this Forbes piece on a woman who retired in her 30s to wander the world is still inspiring. Thanks to a thrifty lifestyle and aggressive saving, she put away huge chunks of her salary and is now able to travel on just the dividends from her investments.

From Skyrises to Traffic Jams: Our Densely Populated Planet — in Pictures
This photo gallery from the Guardian offers an incredible view of the Earth’s people, animals and cityscapes.

Delta Flier Gets Entire 160-Seat Jet to Himself
Thanks to a delay and subsequent rebookings by other passengers, Steve Schneider found himself the only person on a Delta flight from New Orleans to Atlanta, reports USA Today. The flight took off despite its emptiness because the airline needed the plane in Atlanta for a departure the next day. All of this leaves us wondering: Why doesn’t this ever happen to us?

Inside the Fight to Save One of the World’s Most Dangerous Parks
This in-depth essay from National Geographic offers a sobering look at the struggle of conservationists to preserve Virunga National Park in war-torn Congo, home to more than half of the world’s remaining gorillas. It’s a dangerous job; 152 park rangers have been killed over the past two decades.

How ‘Brexit’ Will Affect Travel to Europe
The New York Times investigates the ramifications of the recent Brexit vote for American travelers, from cheaper airfares to potential impact on the U.S. travel industry.

What I Learned in Italy About Loving My Body
This thoughtful essay from AFAR details a woman’s journey from worrying about her weight every time she considers dessert to appreciating Italy’s culture and history by fully experiencing its cuisine.

U.S. Border Authority Seeks Travellers’ Social Media Details
Do you want the U.S. government reading your tweets? BBC reports that Customs and Border Protection (part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security) has proposed an update to visa waiver application forms that would ask applicants for their social media handles. The question would be optional.

This week’s video is a dreamy look at India’s people, places and food.

10 Best India Experiences
16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

— written by Sarah Schlichter

When I told people I was taking a vacation to Slovenia, the most common response I got was, “…Where?” The second most common response: “Why?”

To answer the questions in order: Slovenia is a small central European country bordered by Italy, Austria, Hungary and Croatia. And I went there because I was inspired by photos like these:

lake bohinj slovenia

Bohinij, the country’s largest lake, is part of Triglav National Park.

ljubljana slovenia

The capital city, Ljubljana, is home to a picturesque and colorful Old Town overlooking the Ljubjanica River.

predjama castle slovenia

The spectacularly situated Predjama Castle is built into the side of a cliff and connects to a network of caves.

vintgar gorge slovenia

Visitors can hike a boardwalk path alongside an emerald river at the bottom of Vintgar Gorge.

piran slovenia

When you walk through Piran, you feel as though you’ve stepped into Italy; this seaside town was ruled by Venice for centuries.

gibanica cake slovenia

Gibanica, a traditional Slovenian dessert, is made with apples, poppy seeds, wanuts and cheese.

Slovenia Trip Reviews by Real Travelers
Planning a Trip to Europe: Your 10-Step Guide

Are you interested in visiting Slovenia?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

“Backpacking Europe” used to refer solely to travel with an oversized canvas sack strapped across your shoulders, with nights spent in a youth hostel bunk bed. Today, “backpacking” is more of a mindset than an actual act, says James Feess, author of the book “The Savvy Backpacker’s Europe on a Budget.”

Originally from the U.S. Midwest, James and his wife Susan have spent time living in Paris and traveling throughout Europe. Their website The Savvy Backpacker offers advice for independent travelers who literally backpack across Europe and those who apply a backpacker mentality to travel comfortably yet budget-consciously.

james and susan feess paris savvy backpacker

We recently chatted with James and Susan, who are now in New York City.

IndependentTraveler.com: Is there an age limit on backpacking?
James and Susan Feess:
No way! We’ve seen backpackers of all ages. The last time we were staying in a hostel in London we met a 70-something Australian man who was traveling around Europe for multiple months.

IT: Why do you think most people outgrow the backpacker mindset?
JF & SF:
It’s no secret that most backpackers tend to be young and broke, so they do everything as cheaply as possible. It’s natural for people to upgrade their travel styles as they get older, start earning more money and get accustomed to a better standard of living. However, a lot of people maintain the backpacker mindset regardless of income level or age.

Top 25 Ways to Save on Europe Travel

IT: You’re now in your early 30s. How has the mindset changed for you both since you first started backpacking?
JF & SF:
We find now that we focus on value and not cost — and that’s a big difference. For example, you can take a bus across Europe very cheaply. However, it takes much longer than the train. So it really isn’t a great value because it’s costing you time, which is more valuable than money. Now we take the train whenever we travel because the extra cost is a good value. The same principle applies to food, lodging, entertainment, [almost] everything.

IT: What are some of the non-monetary benefits to traveling like a backpacker?
JF & SF:
Traveling on a budget helps get you closer to living like local. Staying in a five-star hotel and eating at high-end restaurants is about as far away from local living as you can get because most locals don’t do that. However, budget travelers have to stay in more modest accommodation and eat where the locals eat because that’s the best value and cheapest option. Personally, we prefer renting a modest apartment. This gives you an instant connection to a neighborhood.

IT: Do you travel like a backpacker 100 percent of the time? Any indulgences you want to confess?
JF & SF:
We try sticking to our backpacker roots but we do “splurge” a bit more these days. Back when we were in our early 20s we would try surviving on as little food as possible, but now we have a nicer meal once or twice. Sometimes we’ll go really crazy and buy the $11 bottle of wine instead of the $6 bottle!

Having a little more money does open new doors to better experience a culture. For example, we’ve taken a few cooking classes in France, and this is a great hands-on way to experience the culture that we couldn’t afford on a backpacker’s budget. Another possibility: specialized walking tours. They can get a little expensive, but they give you so much information that you’d never know otherwise.

IT: Tell us about some of your favorite places you’ve visited over the last year.
JF & SF:
While it isn’t Europe, we actually just got back from traveling to Cape Town, South Africa. It was an amazing trip and we were able to “live it up” since everything is really cheap there. It was probably our most luxurious trip. For example, we got a really nice steak meal for $15 and alcohol was only $3 to $4 in a restaurant. We ended up staying nearly two weeks.

IT: Aside from occasional trips elsewhere, you tend to focus on Europe. Are there any spots in Europe you haven’t visited but want to?
JF & SF:
We still haven’t visited Iceland. It’s at the top of our list. Unfortunately, Iceland isn’t cheap. So we’ll keep saving until we have enough. We want to spend a lot more time in Italy and Spain. And Croatia. And Berlin in the summer.

Quiz: Which European City Are You?
Planning a Trip to Europe: Your 10-Step Guide

— interview conducted by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Check out the travel news and features you might have missed this week.

buffalo at Yellowstone national park

Park Service Considers Visitor Caps, Expects Record Crowds
The U.S. National Park Service is examining ways to better control crowds in the most popular parks, the Associated Press reports. “We realize that currently we’re on an unsustainable course in terms of demands for visitation,” one Yellowstone National Park official said.

America Issues a Travel Alert Covering Europe
Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of State issued a travel alert for anyone planning to visit Europe. The Economist questions the sensibility of issuing an alert for an entire continent.

Strikes in France Causing Major Rail Travel Disruptions
Nearly half of all high-speed and regional trains in France didn’t run June 1 because of a strike that could last well into next week. Rail worker unions are protesting working conditions and changes to labor rules, Travel Pulse reports. The strike is also affecting trains to Spain and Italy.

World’s Longest and Deepest Rail Tunnel, Through Swiss Alps, Opens
On the same day France suffered from train troubles, Switzerland celebrated the opening of the world’s largest and deepest rail tunnel. Seventy years in the making, the Gotthard Base Tunnel stretches 35 miles through the Swiss Alps and is expected to speed up travel times through Europe, the New York Times says.

5 Times Travel Insurance Won’t Help a Vacation Gone Wrong
It’s always good to know what your travel insurance will cover. But you can’t possibly anticipate all scenarios. This Fox News article reminds you of a handful of possibilities that aren’t covered by trip insurance.

7 Travel Apps for Making Your Summer Vacation Plans
A handful of smartphone apps will make summer travel a lot easier, Mashable suggests. They include an app that maps out a route based on your interests, an electronic travel journal and an app that keeps you updated on airport security wait times.

Help Us Create the Ultimate Road Trip Playlist for Memorial Day Weekend
If you’re going on a driving trip this summer, add 30 songs from The Washington Post’s crowdsourced “ultimate road trip playlist” to your soundtrack. The eclectic mix includes Aretha Franklin, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Radiohead and Lucinda Williams.

Rule No. 1 of traveling with a baby: Don’t lose the baby. So says a New Zealander dad in his amusing video “10 Ways to Travel with a Baby.” The video was filmed in Rotorua on the North Island of New Zealand, with the Museum of Art and History, geothermal pools, redwood forests and Mt. Ngongotaha as backdrops.

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma