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The last minutes of summer are ticking away, with just two days left until the official start of autumn. So while the final countdown is on, I count down for you a batch of intriguing things in the world of travel that will help you decide where to go this fall (and winter), and how to get there in the smartest possible way.

autumn road


10 Transport Apps to Help You Get Around
A technology reporter for the Guardian reveals his picks for the best 10 apps to help you navigate various transportation options. While the article is U.K.-centric, most of the apps are applicable to other cities around the world.

9 New Hotels Worthy of Your Instagram Account
Vogue magazine runs down nine new properties around the world that are chic enough to appear as a square image in your social media feed, including an artistic enclave on the beach in Nicaragua. Perhaps one will be on your travel list for this fall?

8 Adventurous Ski Holidays for 2016-17
Are you a skier? These are the hottest (coldest?) ski experiences in the world this coming season, according to the Guardian. Heliskiing in British Columbia late this fall, anyone?

7 Ways to Stay Safe When You’re Traveling Alone
Everyone travels alone at some point. Blending in, booking hotels strategically and trusting your gut are among the tips that a batch of frequent solo travelers offer in this Mental Floss article. (For more info, see 15 Mistakes to Avoid When Traveling Solo.)

6 Ways to Stay Healthy When You Travel
If anyone knows what to do to stay healthy on the road, it’s someone who hasn’t been home in nine months. In this Medium article John Fawkes intermittently fasts, takes probiotics and melatonin, and incorporates other habits into his day to stay healthy. (Check out 9 Products to Help You Stay Healthy While Traveling.)

5 Underrated European Destinations
Romania and Montenegro are among a handful of spots in Europe that more travelers should make a priority to see, says a woman who quit her New York City job to travel the world. This autumn’s shoulder season could be the ideal time to check some out.

4 Affordable Ways to Travel Long Term
Huffington Post travel blogger Shannon Ullman suggests that volunteering abroad not only is personally rewarding, but also allows you to stay in a place for a longer period of time without spending a lot of money. She offers three other ways you can afford to travel longer.

3 Off-Season Luxe Destinations for Less
Two spots in the Caribbean and one landlocked U.S. destination made the TODAY Show’s list of three well-discounted destinations for this fall.

2 People Traveling for a Year on $20,000
Writer Chris Guillebeau profiles an Arizona couple who ditched their stay-in-one-place lifestyle and hit the road, allowing housesitting opportunities to determine their destinations. Hard to believe they financed nearly the whole year merely by selling their car!

dog bark park inn cottonwood idaho


1 B&B Shaped Like a Beagle
Just when you think you’ve seen it all, you suddenly discover a bed and breakfast built in the shape of a floppy-eared dog. The blog My Modern Met features the Dog Bark Park Inn in Cottonwood, Idaho, a two-bedroom cottage shaped like a beagle. Go fetch?

Where are you headed this fall?

5 Photos to Inspire an Autumn Trip
12 Places That Shine in Shoulder Season

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Check out the travel stories you may have missed this week.

elephant in africa


‘Our Living Dinosaurs’: There Are Far Fewer African Elephants Than We Thought, Study Shows
CNN reports on a new study that will upset safari goers and animal-loving travelers everywhere. The Great Elephant Census found that the number of elephants left in Africa is much lower than previously estimated — and it went down 30 percent between 2007 and 2014. (Note that some viewers may find a few of the photos in the story graphic or upsetting.)

13 Ridiculously Gorgeous Pictures of Norway
If all you want today is to swoon over huge pictures of beautiful places, Rough Guides has the photo essay for you. Just don’t blame us if you find yourself booking a flight to Norway when you’re done.

Syria’s Message to Tourists: Come Back, Enjoy Our Beaches
Thanks to an ongoing civil war, Syria isn’t currently on the must-visit list for many travelers these days. But the Washington Post reports that the Tourism Ministry in this beleaguered country is trying to lure visitors back with a set of videos featuring the country’s beaches and historic sites.

There Might Be Millions of Dollars in Your Plane’s Cargo Hold
Conde Nast Traveler reveals that in addition to suitcases packed with clothes and souvenirs, your plane’s cargo hold may also be transporting millions of dollars’ worth of currency being sent between banks. (And yes, the airlines charge fees for these checked items as well.)

The Clock That Changed the Meaning of Time
BBC takes a fascinating look at a medieval watchtower in Bern, Switzerland, and the Governor of Time who is responsible for keeping its clock running. It was this clock that sparked the brainstorm leading to Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity.

Priceline Kills Name Your Own Price for Flights
Priceline is best known for its “Name Your Own Price” feature, which allows you to suggest the airfare, hotel rate or car rental price you want to without knowing which company will accept your offer after you’ve booked. Skift reports that the service is no longer available for flights (but it remains for hotels and cars).

End of the Road
Maptia offers a peek into the vanishing world of Bhutan’s Brokpa tribe, who have made their living herding yak for hundreds of years — but whose way of life is now threatened by a new road and the encroachment of modernity.

This week’s video offers a unique challenge: to see how many “Looney Tunes” characters this Southwest flight attendant mimics during an in-flight announcement.


Planning an African Safari
9 Places to See Before They Disappear

— written by Sarah Schlichter

I admit it: I’m mourning the end of summer — those warm days spent basking on the beach, those last rays of sun lingering late into the evening. Fortunately, one of my favorite seasons to travel lies ahead.

I love autumn trips for the cool, comfortable weather, the lack of crowds and — of course — the colors. Check out five photos to get you in the mood to travel this fall.

scottish highlands autumn


Go hill walking in the Scottish Highlands and enjoy the dramatic fall colors — without the summer crowds. (Check out our 10 Best Scotland Experiences.)

mt fuji autumn


Japan may be most famous for its spring cherry blossom season, but autumn is a gorgeous time to visit Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, with fall foliage peaking from late October through much of November.

central park new york city autumn trees


Crisp, cool temperatures and crunchy leaves underfoot make fall our favorite time to wander through Central Park in New York City.

waterton lakes national park alberta autumn


Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta is one of many magnificent Canadian parks where you can go hiking through mountains blanketed in fall colors. (See our list of the 11 Best Canada Experiences.)

amsterdam canal in autumn


Amsterdam’s canals are picturesque any time of year, but there’s nothing like biking alongside the locals under a fiery orange canopy of trees. (Don’t miss our Amsterdam city guide.)

Where do you want to travel this fall?

The Best Travel Destinations for Every Month
12 Places That Shine in Shoulder Season

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out our favorite travel reads of the week.

couple on vacation


Every Month, This Company Chooses a Random Employee to Send on a Two-Week Vacation
Okay, how do we land a job at this company? Travel + Leisure reports that The Motley Fool, a financial services firm, chooses one employee each month to take a spontaneous two-week vacation — complete with $1,500 of spending money.

Your Underwhelming International Holiday Photos
We love galleries of glossy destination photos as much as the next travel addict, but there’s something both funny and delightful about this roundup of lousy vacation pictures from the Guardian — complete with dismal gray skies, charmless parking lots and even an unwelcome eight-legged hotel guest. (Shudder.)

How Andy Steves Is Redefining His Dad’s Travel Guides for a New Generation
Fans of Rick Steves’ comprehensive Europe guidebooks will be glad to find out that his son Andy is carrying on the family business. Conde Nast Traveler checks in with the junior Steves to find out what’s on his bucket list, why print guidebooks are still relevant and what advice he’d give travelers before their first trip abroad.

Life With the Irish Travellers Reveals a Bygone World
A National Geographic photographer delves into the isolated culture of the Irish Travellers, an ethnic minority with an unwritten language, a nomadic way of life and a set of rigid gender roles. Her photographs offer a look into this rarely glimpsed world.

There Are Still Tons of Cheap Flights to Cuba You Can Book Right Now
On August 31, JetBlue became the first airline in more than 50 years to fly a regularly scheduled commercial flight between the U.S. and Cuba. If you’re looking to hop on one of these flights yourself, Time reports that there are numerous affordable alternatives on flights this fall, including October offerings from $205 roundtrip with taxes.

Returning to Everest: Trekking to Base Camp after the 2015 earthquake
A Lonely Planet writer checks out the scene in Nepal following the tragic earthquake of last year. She discovers that while some damage remains en route to the Everest Base Camp, the villagers along the way are eager to welcome back tourists.

Hong Kong’s Secret Night Meal
Foodies, take note — in Hong Kong it’s customary to eat not three meals a day, but four, reports BBC. Siu yeh is a nighttime snack served between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.

This week’s video is part of a new ad campaign celebrating the “world’s greatest fliers,” who supposedly fly American Airlines. Those of you who’ve flown American — do you agree that your fellow passengers meet these lofty standards?


11 Things Not to Do on a Plane
12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed from around the travelsphere.

leftover spaghetti on plate


In Germany, You May Be Fined if You Don’t Finish Your Meal
Conde Nast Traveler reports on a new trend hitting the dining scene in Germany: all-you-can-eat restaurants charging diners for food left on their plates. It’s part of an effort to reduce waste.

North Korea: How Can I Visit the Secret State, and Is It Morally Right to Go?
The Independent takes a look at the ethical issues associated with travel to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, where visitors must follow rigid group itineraries that don’t necessarily provide a holistic look at the local culture.

This Woman’s Insane Etch A Sketches Will Blow Your Freaking Mind
I can barely draw a stick figure on an Etch A Sketch, which is why I’m so amazed by complex and beautiful images drawn by a traveler named Jane Labowitch during a recent trip to India. BuzzFeed has collected her pictures of the Red Fort, the Taj Mahal and more.

Want Your Children to Grow into More Empathetic Adults? Travel with Them
Quartz examines how travel early in life can serve to encourage empathy, compassion and cognitive flexibility in children. One psychologist notes that just taking a trip isn’t enough; parents should have discussions with their children to help them process the differences they see between the local way of life and their own.

Turning Instagram Into a Radically Unfiltered Travel Guide
A writer for the New York Times explains how she uses Instagram’s location-based searches to get a glimpse at new places before she visits — not to see beautiful photos but for more practical purposes such as figuring out what to wear during a visit to a Muslim country during Ramadan or finding a Puerto Rican beach where the locals hang out.

Bangkok’s Disappearing Street Food
BBC reports on a troubling story to those of us who love eating our way through a new destination. In an effort to clean up the streets, the Bangkok government has evicted thousands of street food vendors from public areas around the city. This includes areas popular with tourists and locals such as Soi 38 and the On Nut Night Market.

In this week’s mesmerizing video, actress Rachel Grant shows us how to pack more than 100 items into a single carry-on.


The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time
7 Things Not to Do When Packing a Carry-On Bag

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the week’s most interesting stories from around the travel world.

airplane food


“Nightmarish School-Dinner Fare”: Airline Food Taste Test
The Guardian puts airline food to the test with deliciously scathing results. Of one EasyJet sandwich, the author writes, “It is a bready Alcatraz incarcerating one slim slice of cheddar that has briefly been dabbed with ‘seasoned mayo’ (presumably seasoned with air, for all the flavour it adds) and a ‘mixed-leaf salad’ whose sparse scattering of shrivelled leaves looks more like some foliage has blown in through the window during prep than a deliberate garnish.”

Is This the Future of Hands-Free Luggage?
CNN profiles a bizarre new travel accessory: My Hitch, a gadget that allows you to hook your suitcase to your waistband so it will follow you wherever you go. Because every traveler needs a luggage tail!

Travel 3,000 Miles Through China’s Wondrous Wild West
A National Geographic photographer describes the experience of riding a train for 52 hours across China with his family. (Don’t forget to click through the gallery at the top of the story to see his powerful images.)

The Entire Continent of Australia Has Moved Five Feet in 22 Years
Thanks to its position atop an active tectonic plate, Australia has moved about five feet to the north over the last couple of decades. Though that may not sound like much, Conde Nast Traveler notes that such shifts can have a meaningful effect on devices that use GPS technology.

Tourists Blame Google Maps for Sending Them Into Venice in a Car
Speaking of GPS, Travel + Leisure reports on a couple of tourists in a rental car who blundered into a pedestrian-only section of Venice, nearly hitting a bystander along the Grand Canal. Their excuse? They were following Google Maps.

A Cheese Made from … Donkey Milk?
A BBC reporter journeys to Serbia to taste the world’s most expensive cheese, made from the milk of local donkeys. It’s said to slow the aging process and boost immunity and virility.

This week’s video is a tearjerker, featuring an Iowa choir singing “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” on a plane in honor of a WWII soldier, whose remains were being escorted on the flight from Germany to Atlanta.



Lost in Venice: One Wrong Turn and You May Never Leave
11 Things Not to Do on a Plane

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed around the travelverse this week.

vis-a-vis see through luggage


Traveling With a See-Through Suitcase Will Force You to Pack Neatly
Would you pay more than $550 for a suitcase that puts everything inside it on display? The makers of the Vis-a-Vis sure hope so, reports Gizmodo. This hard-shelled suitcase is completely transparent.

Behind the Scenes at a B&B: The Joys — and Challenges — of Being an Innkeeper
Ever dreamed of retiring to run a B&B out in the country? You might change your mind after reading this story, in which a Washington Post reporter shadows an innkeeper at a Pennsylvania B&B. She discovers a life of grocery store runs, room maintenance and endless guest requests — as well as moments when it’s all worth it.

23 Companies That Will Help You Travel the World for Free (and Maybe Even Pay You to Do It)
Forbes uncovers a few creative ways to take a free vacation, from house-sitting to helping foreigners practice their English.

Living Where the Sea Turns to Ice
BBC takes us on a moving journey to northwestern Greenland, where a reporter meets a 5-year-old named Dharma living in an orphanage in the village of Uummannaq. In a land of seemingly endless ice, the child and the reporter find a few brief moments of connection.

The NASA Space Treatment That Will Cure Your Seasickness
A doctor who regularly travels on cruises to the North and South Poles reveals to Conde Nast Traveler her choice for the best seasickness remedy: a prescription medication called promethazine. She also explains why the medicines we usually use for allergies also work for motion sickness.

Rescue Dog Becomes Instagram Sensation in L.A. for His Culinary Adventures
Lonely Planet wins the prize for this week’s most adorable story, about a rescue dog named Popeye the Foodie who’s been eating (or at least posing) his way around Los Angeles.

10 Travel Innovations That Make Globe-Hopping Better Than Ever
As much as we like to complain about the annoying parts of travel, this story from Bloomberg reminds us of the many nifty innovations that can really improve a trip, from smart bag tags that help prevent lost luggage to the rise of premium economy.

Get pumped up for the Olympic Games in Rio with this commercial from United, featuring members of the U.S. Olympic team.


12 Best Gadgets for Any Trip
Photos: 8 Best Greenland Experiences

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out our favorite reads from around the travel world this week.

ani ruins turkey


UNESCO Just Added 9 New World Heritage Sites to Your Travel Bucket List
Mashable reports on the nine sites recently recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including rock art in China, an ancient walled city in Greece and temple ruins in Micronesia.

15 Phone Hacks Every Traveler Needs to Know
BuzzFeed offers useful tips for anyone who wants to use their phone in a foreign country, including how to protect yourself if you lose it and which apps offer messaging through Wi-Fi (so you can stay in touch without burning through data).

The Nation That Hates to Be Late
BBC investigates Switzerland’s reputation for efficiency and punctuality, values that for the Swiss represent “a source of deep contentment” but can sometimes be irritating to less organized visitors.

For Want of a Coffeepot, Your Flight Is Delayed
The New York Times examines a surprising source of flight delays: a non-functional coffee maker. It’s not all the potentially angry caffeine addicts that could keep your plane on the tarmac, but rather that a malfunction in the coffee maker could be a symptom of a larger problem such as an electrical issue.

The Secrets of the World’s Best Travel Photographer
The Telegraph interviews Marsel van Oosten, a Dutchman who just won the Travel Photographer of the Year competition. He lists Namibia as one of his favorite places to take photos and stresses the importance of finding unique places and perspectives to shoot.

Fair Warning: Don’t Visit This Country This Summer
A writer for the Business Journals examines how other countries’ governments warn their citizens against traveling to the U.S., citing America’s “racial tensions,” high medical costs and mass shootings.

Okinawa: Secrets for a Long and Happy Life
Lonely Planet journeys to Okinawa to try to discover why these Japanese islands are home to more centenarians than anywhere else on Earth.

Will [Your] Next Hotel Room Be Delivered by Drone?
CNN reports on an intriguing new concept: a self-sustaining hotel room that can be dropped off by a drone anywhere in the world. The idea, known as Driftscape, is one of the finalists for the 2016 Radical Innovation Award.

We always love Air New Zealand’s in-flight safety videos (don’t miss its “Men in Black” spoof from last year), and the latest one is no exception. Watch Anna Faris and Rhys Darby in a madcap romp through various Hollywood movie tropes.


Quiz: How Well Do You Know Travel Movies?
9 Places You Haven’t Visited — But Should

— written by Sarah Schlichter

The European Commission has delayed making a decision about whether to halt the program that allows American and Canadian tourists to go to Europe without visas.

visa schengen


The commission originally said it would decide in mid-July about whether to suspend the Schengen visa waiver program for citizens of the United States, Canada and Brunei. But the commission’s leaders decided last week to delay a decision until the fall because talks with the U.S. and Canada are still in progress.

As we reported in April, the Schengen visa program allows Americans, Canadians and the citizens of more than two dozen European countries to travel to and between countries in Europe without obtaining a visa in advance.

A key principle of the program is visa waiver reciprocity, but the United States, Canada and Brunei were not abiding by that. The U.S. government requires the citizens of five European countries (Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Cyprus and Croatia) to obtain an advance visa, while Canada mandates such visas for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens. Brunei formerly required Croatians to get them.

A recent statement from the European Commission notes that Brunei has lifted the visa requirement for Croatian citizens. However, there’s been no meaningful progress on full reciprocity with Canada or the U.S. Talks with Canada will continue at a summit in late October, while U.S. government officials indicated to the E.U. that there would be “little chance of evolution” on the subject before the presidential and Congressional elections in November.

The E.U. still could decide not to suspend the program at all, according to the Wall Street Journal. If the E.U. decides there would be significant negative impacts on the European countries and its citizens, then it can keep the Schengen program alive without full reciprocity. The European Commission did acknowledge that the number of U.S. and Canadian visitors to Europe would decrease if visas were required, leading to “a considerable economic loss.”

Stay tuned for further updates.

Quiz: Which European City Are You?
Planning a Trip to Europe: Your 10-Step Guide

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Catch up on the travel stories you may have missed.

woman sleeping at airport


Why Your Eastward Jet Lag Is Worse, According to Math
CNN reports on a new math model that explains why many travelers have more trouble with jet lag when traveling east than they do going west.

Your Awkward Family Travel Photos
Have a laugh over this slideshow from the New York Times featuring bad ’80s hair, goofy poses and kids having temper tantrums — all the stuff great family trips are made of.

How a Hidden Noodle Shop Tour Helps Street Youth in Vietnam
National Geographic reports on a street food tour with a heart. The Oodles of Noodles tour in Hoi An, Vietnam, is led by local street kids being trained to work in the hospitality industry.

Why I Love Being a Pilot
A pilot tells the Guardian about his experience of “place lag,” which he describes as the feeling of being immersed in one destination and then, after a few hours on a plane, having to suddenly adapt to a new place and culture.

The Ultimate Berlin Street Food
BBC Travel investigates the history and cultural significance of currywurst, which is said to have been invented in 1949 by a bored snack bar owner in West Berlin.

5 Changes That Have Made Flying Safer
Conde Nast Traveler highlights just how safe it is to fly these days — there were only 136 fatalities last year out of 3.5 billion fliers — and explains the policies and technology that have led us to this point.

Google’s Mobile Service Gets International Upgrade
Travelers who rely on their phones abroad should check out this article from Travel + Leisure, which describes improvements to Google’s Project Fi mobile service — including high data speeds in more than 100 countries. (One important caveat: So far the service is only available for Google’s Nexus phones.)

CT Scanners Could End the Liquid Ban, and They’re Coming to Phoenix This Year
Airline blogger Cranky Flier reports that American Airlines will be testing out CT scanners at Phoenix Sky Harbor International this year. Such technology is currently in use for checked bags, but if it comes to the airport security checkpoint it could conceivably speed up the line and possibly even keep us from having to pull out our bags of liquids and gels. Here’s hoping…

This week’s video is a twofer from Visit Norway, which has introduced a new campaign called Sheep with a View. First up is the video introducing the project, while the second one is a behind-the-scenes look that’s even cuter.



10 Best Norway Experiences
How to Fight Jet Lag

— written by Sarah Schlichter