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Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two sweet spots for a stroll.

Would you rather…

… walk along a pristine beach in the Seychelles, or …

couple on seychelles beach



… hike through a lush rain forest in Daintree National Park, Australia?

daintree national park rain forest


The dreamy Seychelles Islands, located in the Indian Ocean, are a popular destination for honeymooners, divers, sailors and beach bums. Start with the main island of Mahe, where there are more than 60 beaches to choose from. Australia’s Daintree Rainforest offers multiple ways to explore, including walks and zip-lines through the canopy.

11 Best Australia Experiences
Madagascar/Mauritius/Seychelles Travel Forum

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

A canyon at Australia's UluruOf the five destinations on my ultimate travel bucket list, I have managed to tick off one so far: Australia. And it was everything I could have hoped for — which was fortunate because, as with many bucket list trips, it was expensive and required a serious time commitment.

But was it really fortunate?

No, it wasn’t.

You see, just stepping foot on Australian soil isn’t what made going there such an amazing bucket list trip for me. It was that I did it the “right” way. The right way for me, that is.

Australia is a huge country with lots to offer visitors. There are the vibrant cities in which you’ll find art museums, fine dining and lots of shopping; unrivaled natural attractions from the barren but beautiful Outback to the Great Barrier Reef teeming with life; a colorful criminal past and a rich Aboriginal culture. And then there are the Aussies themselves, laidback folks with a great sense of humor and a love for beer and barbecue.

But which part of this vast Down Under do you take in? Do you try to see it all, spending just a little time in any one place? Do you narrow it down and pick out just a few highlights, ignoring all else? How do you make such a once-in-a-lifetime trip as special as it can be, so that it truly is a bucket list experience?

Ask
In order to make any trip all you want it to be, you must first ask yourself, “Why am I going here?”

There is no wrong or right answer, but be honest with yourself, as the answer to this question is the start of planning your perfect trip. Is it simply important to you to tick off a new destination? Or are you intrigued because you’ve read some of the best new chefs are coming out of Melbourne? Or perhaps you’ve always wanted to hold a koala and feed a kangaroo?

11 Best Australia Experiences

Research
Once you’ve decided why you’re going, you can research the various ways to visit. If what’s important is simply being in the place and seeing its most iconic sites, a guided tour might be your best bet. On the other hand, if you’re most fascinated by a specific aspect of the place — the Aboriginal culture of Australia, let’s say — then finding day tours or attractions that focus on that one interest should be your priority.

In my dreams of Australia, I was always fascinated by the wildlife, the Outback, the Aussies and the Aboriginal culture. So everywhere I went I made sure to seek out these things. In Sydney, I visited a zoo that allowed me to cuddle a koala and feed kangaroos. Near Cairns, I chose to skip the Great Barrier Reef and instead stay on a cattle station for three days to get to know the owner and see what life was like in the Outback. On my visit to Uluru, I only booked Aborigine-led tours so I could experience the country’s interior from their perspective.

All these experiences resonated with me because they were the things I already knew were important to me. I didn’t need to see the Sydney Opera House; I don’t particularly like opera and touring a theater would not be enjoyable for me. I didn’t need to climb the Sydney Harbour Bridge; if I were going to exercise my body that way, it would be on a hike in the Blue Mountains. And to this day I don’t really feel I missed out by not snorkeling off the Great Barrier Reef. Instead, I’m glad I skipped the seasickness and panic I always experience when snorkeling from a boat.

But other visitors to Australia might have left unsatisfied without some or all of those experiences.

Bucket list trips are dream trips, literally. We dream about the destinations years before ever visiting. We visualize what it will be like. But it’s only by being aware of those dreams and our expectations and then finding experiences that match them that we can actually make our dream bucket list trips come true.

How to Make Your Dream Trip a Reality


– written by Dori Saltzman

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two unique musical learning experiences.

Would you rather…

… learn to play the didgeridoo in Australia

didgeridoo aborigine australia



… take a tango class in Argentina?

tango argentina


The didgeridoo is Australia’s most famous instrument, and you can learn to play it in places such as Perth (see DidgeridooBreath.com) and Melbourne (DidgesbyBruce.com.au). It’s easy to catch a tango performance in Buenos Aires, but many of the venues that offer shows also have lessons for beginners who want to get a taste of the dance. See our Buenos Aires guide for more info.

11 Best Australia Experiences

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Suffering from the Monday doldrums? For everyone out there facing the beginning of another work week, here’s a little jolt of wanderlust to brighten up your morning. Each Monday, we offer a photo of a spectacular place to spark ideas for your future travels.

This week, we offer a shot of campers on Australia‘s remote Gunbarrel Highway, which runs between the Northern Territory and Western Australia.

camping gunbarrel highway australia


Our Favorite Hotels in Sydney, Australia

Send us your best travel shot! E-mail your most beautiful or captivating travel photo to feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put Monday Inspiration in the subject line.)

Top 25 Ways to Save on Australia Travel

– written by Sarah Schlichter

afraidBill Bryson may have been going for a tongue-in-cheek approach when he wrote about the various ways one might die in Australia (“In a Sunburned Country”) and along the Appalachian Trail (“A Walk in the Woods”), but he was more than just a little serious too.

If you’re going to visit Australia, the truth is you’d better watch out for saltwater crocodiles, sharks, stinging jellyfish and redback spiders. And bears in North America are nothing to laugh at (except when Bryson writes about them, that is).

But wildlife predators are not the only thing tourists need to be wary of when traveling if they want to get home in one piece. I’ve read too many tragic tales of travelers killed in helicopter tours (in Hawaii and in New York City, to name a few) to ever climb aboard one.

Drinking Water Safety

And, of course, there’s always the cliché that rings a little too true about holding on for dear life when riding taxis in Rome, Paris or New York City.

Now, sadly, I may also have to worry about gondolas and water buses in Venice.

Earlier this month a German tourist was killed when the gondola he was on collided with a water bus in Venice’s Grand Canal. As it turns out, the gondolier tested positive for cocaine, but authorities also believe boat congestion on the Canal may have been a factor.

10 Things You Should Never Wear When Traveling Abroad

Will this incident stop me from taking a gondola ride when I finally get to Venice? Probably not. The truth is I have a better chance of being hit by a car on the way to work than dumped in the Grand Canal during my few days in Venice. So, no, fear is not going to stop me, but I’ll certainly be more vigilant. Just as I checked for spiders in my shoes in Australia, avoided taxis in Paris and eschew helicopters everywhere.

Do any destination’s specific dangers scare you? Do you take any precautions?

– written by Dori Saltzman

Suffering from the Monday doldrums? For everyone out there facing the beginning of another work week, here’s a little jolt of wanderlust to brighten up your morning. Each Monday, we offer a photo of a spectacular place to spark ideas for your future travels.

This week’s shot is of fireworks in Melbourne, Australia.

melbourne australia fireworks city skyline night


Our Favorite Melbourne Hotels

Send us your best travel shot! E-mail your most beautiful or captivating travel photo to feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put Monday Inspiration in the subject line.)

25 Ways to Save on Australia Travel

– written by Sarah Schlichter

sydney opera houseEach month, we highlight one new trip review submitted by an IndependentTraveler.com reader. If your review is featured, you’ll win an IndependentTraveler.com logo item!

In this month’s featured review, reader Carmen Critchlow writes about her first trip Down Under — a cruise aboard the Celebrity Solstice. “We had an informative backstage tour of the Opera House, what a fascinating history that building has,” Carmen wrote. “We took a leisurely stroll across the Harbor Bridge and enjoyed the great view.

“We were lucky to be here in March because on June 30, 2013, the Sydney Light Rail and Sydney Monorail will cease operations and will be removed to facilitate the development of the new Sydney International Convention, Exhibition and Entertainment Precinct at Darling Harbor. The trains are marked ‘Farewell Sydney.’ We were glad to be able to take a ride on a piece of history before it was gone.”

Read the rest of Carmen’s review here: Fantastic Cruise to Australia/New Zealand. Carmen has won an IndependentTraveler.com duffel bag!

Feeling inspired? Write your own trip review!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Did you know that the first Wednesday in April has been declared National Walking Day by the American Heart Association? Well, now you do.

While the AHA aims to encourage more physical activity among those of us who spend hours upon hours sitting at a desk, we couldn’t resist putting a travel spin on the day — because let’s face it, most of us walk much more when we’re off exploring a new place than we do when we’re at home.

We recently asked our followers on Facebook to name their favorite city or neighborhood for strolling — and the list of places we got in response would inspire just about anyone to hit the pavement. Following are a few of our favorites:

“Assisi, Italy … peaceful, quaint & beautiful!” — Tracey Pino

assisi italy church



New York City — especially Broadway from Columbus Circle to the 80′s” — Beth Glass

central park new york city dog walking



“Old City in Jerusalem” — Rose Kemps

old city jerusalem souq souk market



“Definitely Sydney — from the Rocks all the way around to the Botanical Gardens” — Gill Harvey

botanical gardens sydney



What Not to Do in a New City

Which city tops your list of favorite places to walk?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Suffering from the Monday doldrums? For everyone out there facing the beginning of another work week, here’s a little jolt of wanderlust to brighten up your morning. Each Monday, we offer a photo of a spectacular place to spark ideas for your future travels.

Today’s shot is of beautiful Millaa Millaa Falls in Far North Queensland, Australia.

millaa millaa falls far north queensland



25 Ways to Save on Australia Travel

Send us your best travel shot! E-mail your most beautiful or captivating travel photo to feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put Monday Inspiration in the subject line.)

In Your Face: 9 Up-Close Animal Encounters

– written by Sarah Schlichter

australia Australia is one of those epic destinations — a vast place we need plenty of time to explore. But a weeks-long Australia trip isn’t cheap (especially for travelers who must purchase airfare from the U.S.), and if you want to spend any kind of extended time there without the aid of a trust fund, you’ll either need to save significant cash before your trip — or find a way to make some money while in Australia. Enter the working holiday visa.

If you’re a resident of the U.S., Canada, France, the U.K., Germany, Italy or one of several other countries and are between the ages of 18 and 30 at the time of your application, you can secure an Australia working holiday visa, which grants permission to stay in the country for up to 12 months, paying taxes at a rate of 29 percent (some of which can be recouped once you leave). And if you end up finding a job you love, no worries, mate. Your employer can help you stay for an additional four years after your initial visa expires.

The visa — which generally costs a few hundred dollars — doesn’t guarantee you a job, just the right to work and live in Australia for up to a year. You’ll still need to arrange your flights to Australia and find your own work. Some companies will set up a few nights’ accommodations for new employees, but after that, you’re on your own in Oz.

What are your job options in Australia? You can stay in a major city, working in a hostel or restaurant, or make your home in a picturesque country spot like one of Australia’s wine regions, where you can help with the annual harvest. You can work on a cattle ranch in the Outback, or take a job at a ski resort in the mountains. You’ve got some choices to make.

If you meet the requirements to get that visa, a working vacation can help you fund your extended stay in Australia, giving you the time and money to explore the beautiful land Down Under.

– written by Katie Hammel, the editor at BootsnAll.com, where you can search for cheap flights to Australia or learn more about the best places to be an expat.