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time fliesThis post is part of our Time Flies series, highlighting unique ways to spend your down time at airports around the world.

With the holidays upon us and busy travelers scurrying about to reach their final destinations, I was hoping some airport, anywhere, would be able to bring the holiday spirit forth. Lo and behold, the Munich International Airport delivered in grand style.

For those unfamiliar, this year marks the 14th year that the Munich International Airport has brought the Bavarian spirit front and center with its seasonal winter market. What better way to start your holiday than by visiting a traditional German Christmas market before your holiday trip even begins?

Within the market, travelers will find 50 authentic stands filled with everything from schnitzel and mulled wine to cuckoo clocks and ornaments. To make things even more seasonal — keeping in mind that all this is at an airport — there is the smell of fresh ice emanating from the oversized skating rink combined with some 300 Christmas trees, the highlight of which stands nearly 50 feet tall.

munich airport winter market


While the seasonal market is sure to delight, the Munich International Airport is not without its year-round staples to enhance your layover a bit more. Along with the usual airport staples, it happens to be the proud owner of the largest roofed-in beer garden in all of Germany.

Yes, that’s right — an airport with an actual beer garden. With space for more than 600 thirsty travelers, it’ll make you feel like you’ve stepped from Christmastime into the middle of Oktoberfest. Order an Airbrau, a highly rated, relatively inexpensive beer brewed on site. As you suck down that cold (lukewarm) one, you’ll take in the chestnut trees, a real maypole and jaw-dropping (by airport standards) views of the architecture. If you didn’t fill up on German fare at the Christmas market, this is your second chance to grab that schnitzel (apologies for the writer’s personal bias, as plenty of other options exist).

Photos: 12 Unforgettable Germany Experiences
Best Airports for Layovers

So if you’re planning a jaunt through Germany this time of year, and airport options abound, consider Munich International Airport as a place that a layover just might not be so bad. Do you know of any other airports getting into the holiday spirit? If so, please share them in the comments below.

– written by Matt Leonard

time fliesThis post is part of our Time Flies series, highlighting unique ways to spend your down time at airports around the world.

Are you tired of the stale airport air? Does the wafting smell of Dunkin’ Donuts (or Tim Horton’s, for the northern crowd) eventually just wear you down?

If so, then Singapore‘s Changi Airport will be, quite literally, a breath of fresh air.

If you’re lucky enough to be flying from Terminal 1, check out the open-air Cactus Garden. With more than 40 different types of cacti and succulents, it sure beats an hour of trying to avoid eye contact with that fellow in pajamas directly across from you at the gate.

Should you be flying out of Terminal 2, have no fear. You could always wander over to explore the cacti, time permitting. Should time not permit, however, you’ve got a natural bevy of options at your disposal. In Terminal 2 you’ll first find what’s known as the “Enchanted Garden.”

I generally fly from Philadelphia, so anything pairing “airports” with “enchanting” — without the inclusion of soft pretzels — piques my interest.

This area in Changi’s Terminal 2 features blooming flowers coupled with LED lighting and sound effects. Should you find that dizzying, the undulating path is sure to help.

For those who aren’t aware, there is a natural rivalry between terminals (or if there’s not, there should be). Terminal 2 wasn’t about to let the cacti of Terminal 1 go mano a mano with just the aforementioned Enchanted Garden. Oh, no. Fliers deserve better.

Enter the Orchid Garden, Koi Pond and Sunflower Garden — all located in Terminal 2.

butterfly garden singapore changi airport 7 Picture-Perfect Airport Gardens

If those four areas of unique airport interest aren’t enough (or conveniently located to your gate), Terminal 3 can do you one better. It’s got a Butterfly Garden.

With over a thousand colorful creatures, this garden provides a unique opportunity to get up close and personal — and even watch a new butterfly coming out of its chrysalis in the Emergence Enclosure.

Have you been to Changi? Do you know of any other airports with unique ways to pass the time? Tell us about it in the comments below.

2 Airports Techies Will Want to Visit

– written by Matt Leonard

airport time fliesThis is the first post in a new series called Time Flies, highlighting unique ways to spend your down time at airports around the world.

Every day that I fly starts the same way. It begins with the inevitable balancing act of figuring out the exact time to leave home, fight traffic, arrive at my local airport, pass security and make it to my gate in a timely fashion. And by “timely fashion,” I don’t mean simply making my flight.

The real goal behind this exercise is to have as little unnecessary airport-sitting time as humanly possible, without missing my flight. It’s my version of risk management. I’m just not a fan of the awkward leatherette rows of chairs rife with computer cords, people in too-comfy-for-public-consumption clothes, rogue bags occupying seats so someone as offensive as me can’t sit nearby, receiving the occasional stray kick from passersby (apology accepted) or just simply staring at the random cast of characters across from me. Who, by the way, I’m certain feel exactly the same about me.

So I want to applaud the airports that recognize this and have kindly displayed a level of ingenuity that makes me want to fly from them, by providing innovative ways for travelers to use their down time. To show my appreciation, these thought leaders will get the showcase they deserve in a monthly blog series called “Time Flies.”

The first airport we’ll feature is Dallas/Fort Worth International, with its new hands-only CPR kiosk.

Who doesn’t want to learn CPR in their downtime? I absolutely do. I can imagine seeing someone running for a plane and not thinking they’ll make it, physically. Using this kiosk at DFW, which the American Heart Association is placing in Terminal C for the next six months, I can learn CPR and know that if that moment comes, I’ll be fully armed with the ability to do what’s needed — without having awkward and potentially germy mouth-to-mouth contact. Brilliant!

Before learning about this kiosk, I had no idea that simply pressing on someone’s chest can be as effective as doing the whole nose-squeeze/pseudo-kiss thing. That, in itself, is a public service. But it gets better.

The short video at the kiosk is set to “Stayin’ Alive,” the classic Bee Gees disco hit, which apparently has the perfect tempo for hands-only CPR. Think of John Travolta hovering over the stricken individual. He unleashes a strong chest thrust at the bottom end of his infamous disco maneuver, rendering the poor soul saved. For that brief moment, any one of us could be John Travolta.

Best Airports for Layovers
Two Airports Techies Will Want to Visit

So I thank you, DFW, for your commitment to being one of the nation’s healthiest airports and your outside-the-box thinking. All kidding aside, this is a valuable service and something worth checking out the next time you’re in Dallas.

Have you seen a zany airport idea or had a great experience while waiting for a flight? Share it with us in the comments!

– written by Matt Leonard

billy bishop toronto city airport aerialWhen’s the last time you transferred from an airport into the heart of downtown without paying a dime? And when’s the last time you got drinks and snacks at an airport — for free?

I did both of these things on a recent trip to Toronto via Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. Unlike the much larger Toronto Pearson International Airport, which is about 17 miles outside of town, Billy Bishop is located in the heart of Toronto — specifically, on an island across a narrow strip of water from downtown. It’s currently served by only two carriers, Porter Airlines and (in a more limited capacity) Air Canada.

I flew Porter from Newark to Toronto and back, and was struck by how different this airport felt than any other I’d ever flown into. First off, you get there via the world’s shortest ferry (the ride is just 90 seconds across a 132-yard stretch of water), after riding a free shuttle bus to the ferry terminal from downtown. No need to take a pricey cab.

Following a quick trip through security, you settle into a lounge with couches and cushy chairs arranged around coffee tables, looking out through large windows at the Toronto skyline. The Wi-Fi is free (albeit slow), and you can help yourself to complimentary bottled water, soft drinks, tea, coffee and snacks. All in all, it’s a pretty decent place to wait out a flight delay.

Best Airports for Layovers

Of course, such a small airport has its drawbacks. This isn’t the place to go if you want to browse a bookstore, shop for duty-free goodies or eat a full-service meal; there are no stores or restaurants, just a quick-stop cafe. And you can forget about fun extras like massage chairs or play areas for kids.

Billy Bishop isn’t the world’s most entertaining airport. But after my last flight through New York JFK — where the service was sour, the customs line stretched for miles, and I had to shell out $10 for a measly bottled water and yogurt — I’d go back to that laid-back lounge in a heartbeat.

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

What’s your favorite small airport?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

airport sign Are you flying somewhere fun in the near future? Exotic? Far away? I’m half jealous and half not. While I’d love to be getting away, I don’t envy anyone having to deal with flying right now. In the past two days, the flying experience has gone from not so fun to downright unpleasant.

According to a Washington Post article, flights have fallen behind schedule for the second straight day at two of New York’s three major airports, a direct result of air traffic controller furloughs. By 8:45 a.m. today, delays of 30 to 45 minutes or more were already being reported in New York.

With no end to the furlough in sight (an average of about 10 percent of controllers will be furloughed on any given day), these delays are probably not going to get any better any time soon. Congress has so far made no moves to end the sequester.

And New York isn’t the only metropolitan area to be hit by delays. Yesterday, airports across the country were backed up several hours. Chicago-based United told a reporter for Bloomberg that it saw “alarming” delays in Los Angeles as well. Flights into the city were delayed an average of three hours.

Delta told Bloomberg it also expects to see air delays in Chicago and in San Francisco.

Airport Delays: Six Ways to Cope

The consequences of these delays aren’t just grumpy passengers and getting somewhere late. It also means fliers need to allow more time for their transit. If before you needed an hour to an hour and a half to catch a connecting flight, now you’d better make it three to four hours. If you have to be in your destination by noon, you might want to consider flying in the day before.

The federal government is so aware of the delays that the U.S. Transportation Department is considering suspending enforcement of a regulation that prevents lengthy tarmac delays, the Bloomberg article reports. The rule requires that airlines give passengers a chance to leave a plane if it has been sitting on the tarmac for more than three hours. Airlines can also be fined for the delays. Since 2009, when the tarmac delay regulation was passed, airlines have been canceling flights whenever it looks like a three-hour delay is imminent. With sequester cuts in place and delays of three hours or more entirely possible, that could mean a lot of canceled flights if enforcement of the law isn’t waived.

But it’s not all bad news for fliers. A controversial rule that would have allowed passengers to begin carrying small knives on planes again has been put on hold while the TSA considers additional input. Public opinion has been widely opposed to the measure, as have flight attendants and airlines.

Have you flown in the past two days? Are you flying soon? What are you dreading most? Weigh in below.

What Not to Do at the Airport

– written by Dori Saltzman

baggage claim airportAs a experienced traveler, I know all the right things to do when it comes to making sure you go home with your own luggage. I have a very distinctive red Rimowa suitcase (I’ve never encountered one quite like it), I’ve tied colored ribbons around one handle, and there are some flight and hotel labels stuck on it — so it’s hard to miss.

But last year, after a 10-hour flight from Helsinki and a 1.5-hour wait at Newark’s border control, I was tired and distracted, and when a red suitcase came around the belt, I grabbed it and set off. The wheels were wobbly, which I chucked up to yet another annoyance in an annoying day. Literally 10 steps past the customs agent, I bent down to check out what had happened to the wheels, and that was the moment I knew: this was not my suitcase. It was an absolutely identical model, but there were no ribbons, no decals.

What to Do if an Airline Loses Your Luggage

I immediately went back to the customs agent to ask if I could swap the suitcase, but he said, “No can do” (which was understandable). He called an agent from my airline, who told me that I’d eventually get my suitcase back — but because I had cleared customs it would take three or four hours. Hanging around wasn’t a palatable solution, so I anted up about $82 to have it delivered the next day.

I consider the whole affair an $82 learning experience. And I felt badly for the person whose suitcase it really was (and hope she’ll get those wheels fixed someday).

What’s the silliest travel mistake you made in 2012?

– written by Carolyn Spencer Brown

ozzy osbourneHow would you like to touch down at Ozzy Osbourne International?

One music exec is calling for this to become a reality, according to the Birmingham Mail. Liverpool is currently home to John Lennon Airport, so why shouldn’t Birmingham, Osbourne’s home town, be renamed after the Black Sabbath rocker? The proposal comes from Jim Simpson of Big Bear Music, who discovered the band.

“The message that would carry is instantly international, confident, powerful, unforgettable and says ‘Hey World, we are proud of our own,’” said Simpson in the Birmingham Mail.

“Ozzy might not always have been a paragon of virtue, but he is a genuine flesh and blood Brummie.”

Best Airports for Layovers

Whether this will come to fruition is anyone’s guess — but, of course, it got us thinking about other airports that could carry a musical moniker. How about adding Bruce Springsteen’s name to New Jersey’s Newark Airport? Or giving Elvis Presley top billing at Memphis International? Tony Bennett left his heart in San Francisco, so surely we could leave his name on the airport. And with all due respect to Prime Minister Trudeau, perhaps Montreal‘s airport could be renamed after Celine Dion.

Which airports and musicians do you think would make a good duo?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

car keysTraveling is a pricey proposition, and flying adds even more nickel-and-dime expenses to your tab. Checked baggage fees. Extra leg room fees. In-flight movie fees. Wouldn’t it be great if you could get someone else to pay for your airport parking while you globetrot?

FlightCar, a new company based in California, may soon match up travelers looking for rental cars with travelers who have cars sitting, unused, in long-term airport parking lots.

According to the company’s Web site, the idea hasn’t yet come to fruition, but the service is slated to launch later this year in Oakland and San Jose.

10 Things to Do Before You Travel

What’s in it for renters? Cars rented through FlightCar will supposedly be up to 50 percent cheaper than cars rented through standard rental companies like Hertz, Avis or Enterprise.

What’s in it for rentees? Your car will be earning you money — instead of costing you — while you travel. Plus, FlightCar will even clean your vehicle for you, pre- and post-rental. When you register online, you can set the daily rate and the mileage limit, and each car is insured up to $1 million, according to the company’s Web site.

For more info, check out the video:



What’s your take? Would you let a stranger drive your car while you’re out of town? Share your comments below.

An Airline Fee We Might Actually Want to Pay

–written by Ashley Kosciolek

airport shoppingPeople who discover that I travel often, long-haul mostly and for weeks at a time, say, sagely, during cocktail chat, “You must be a genius at packing.” Actually … no. I’m a graduate of the school of “But what if I need…”

As a packer, I’ve cut back on the books, thanks first to Kindle and now to iPad, though not so much when it comes to movies (Netflix doesn’t transfer out-of-country). Fashion-wise, I have found ways to maximize variety while minimizing outfits. But I’ll confess: Give me too much time in an airport and all hell breaks loose.

On a recent vacation jaunt from Newark to Helsinki, which took a whopping 22 hours thanks to late departures and missed connections, my most egregious problem was neither sleep deprivation nor travel annoyance. It was the extra time for shopping.

The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time

Once I got bored with sitting in the Newark lounge, it occurred to me that I could buy presents. In the airport’s expansive mall, I found a slinky New York-themed T-shirt for my teenage niece, a Big Apple-decorated onesie for the latest addition to my spouse’s Finnish family, and a couple (okay, a bulky wodge) of magazines to support me through the three-week-long English-language desert that is a vacation in Finland.

And that was just Newark. Once we arrived in Frankfurt, where we’d just missed our connecting flight and had four bleary hours to kill, the airport’s liquor stores offered quite the bargain-hunger’s justification. Finland’s taxes on alcohol make otherwise reasonable prices for wine, vodka and Champagne ridiculously expensive, so we loaded up. My husband’s impulse purchase of German sparkling wine put us over the top.

The Ultimate Travel Packing Guide

Suddenly, we were carting seven bags of carry-on stuff onto an airplane (these in addition to the two very chunky suitcases, full of American gourmet items, DVD’s and other necessities, that we’d already checked). Boarding the two-hour flight from Frankfurt to Helsinki, I felt like — to paraphrase my Finnish husband’s charming interpretation of American aphorisms — one of the “Beverly Hilly-Billies.”

So no, I am not a great packer. I will invariably have too much of one thing and not enough of another. But I can offer one silver lining: the things you scramble to buy because you don’t pack well will be the souvenirs you remember the most.

– written by Carolyn Spencer Brown

singapore changi airport movie theaterWhen vetting flights and possible layovers, I take my options for connecting airports very seriously. What’s the distance between connecting gates? How speedy is immigration? Can I find something halfway decent to eat and a quiet, clean spot to sit and wait?

The availability of ultra-hip technology never entered the picture for me, until I recently discovered two airports where it’s actually fun to have a layover.

LaGuardia International Airport, New York City
Mention LaGuardia, and you can pretty much be guaranteed a grimace, wince or groan. But perhaps no longer. LaGuardia has Botoxed its image with the installation of 2,500 iPads throughout Terminals C and D. Tall tables with stools (like those you’d find in a bar) are anchored with iPads that are free for anyone to use.

The Best Airports for Layovers

Scroll the Internet, post on Facebook, play games, monitor your flight — even order a fancy cured beef panini and a beer and have them delivered directly to your table from a nearby eatery. The iPads are a great way to kill time.

(Good news for Minneapolis and Toronto: They’re both scheduled to see similar iPad installations in the coming months.)

Changi Airport, Singapore
Changi is a techie’s dream. The airport won the 2012 World Airport Award for best leisure amenities from Skytrax, a British airline data compiler that runs an annual airport passenger satisfaction survey in 160 countries. The Wi-Fi is free and signals are Speedy Gonzales fast. More than 500 free Internet stations are sprinkled throughout the concourses and gates.

But what’s happening in Terminal 2 is the main attraction. The terminal houses an entertainment center where you can distract yourself with Xbox 360′s, Playstation 3′s and other gaming stations. There are also free, 24-hour movie theaters (in Terminal 2 and also in Terminal 3).

9 Ways to Make the Most of Your Layover

And if all of that isn’t cool enough, the airport has 3D and 4D motion simulators that show eight movies with “visual, sound, motion and environmental effects.”

A long layover has never been more fun.

– written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma