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Catch up on what you might have missed in the travel world this week.

men in business class


Meet the Husbands Who Fly First Class — While Their Wives Travel in Economy
Would you be okay sitting in cattle class while your spouse chills out in first or business? The Telegraph profiles a number of couples that regularly fly separately, with the husband at the front of the plane and the wife in the back. “In my opinion, everyone should travel this way. I think first-class is really rather wonderful — the only way to fly,” says one charming husband, who might feel that everyone should fly in first but won’t pay for his wife to do so.

Travel Photographer of the Year Contest: 2016 Winners
Feast your eyes on these stunning shots submitted to this year’s National Geographic Photographer of the Year Contest, covering destinations from Varanasi, India to Chile’s Atacama Desert.

U.S. Approves 8 Airlines to Fly to Havana Beginning This Fall
USA Today reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation has tentatively approved flights to Havana, Cuba, aboard eight American airlines. If these schedules are given final approval after the upcoming comment period, you’ll soon be able to fly to the Cuban capital from Los Angeles, Miami, Charlotte, Atlanta, New York, Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Tampa, Houston and Newark.

A Longtime Concierge on Hotel Tipping, Online Reviews and More
Conde Nast Traveler interviews a head concierge at the Stafford, a five-star hotel in London, and gets his perspective on the importance of responding to online reviews, the difference in tipping between the U.S. and the U.K., and his number one tip for hotel guests.

Shrinking Pool of Future Pilots Keeps Major Airlines on Edge
Bloomberg reports on an alarming problem in the airline industry: not enough people to fly the planes. Within 10 years, U.S. airlines are expected to be understaffed by some 15,000 pilots, thanks to many older captains retiring and not enough people interested in taking up flying as a career.

Cheryl Strayed: A Close Encounter at Badlands
“Wild” author Cheryl Strayed writes vividly in the New York Times about a 1994 encounter with a bison while she was camping at Badlands National Park.

19 Dreamy Pictures of Croatia
Everyone needs a little eye candy. Indulge yourself with this photo essay from Rough Guides featuring swoon-worthy shots of Croatia.

This week’s featured travel video takes the viewer on a journey through the colorful souks and remote deserts of Morocco.


11 Best Morocco Experiences
12 Travel Photography Mistakes to Avoid

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out this week’s most compelling reads from around the travel world.

rome woman with view


Want to Retire in Your 30s and Travel The World? This Woman Did
We can’t all be wealthy lawyers raking in a six-figure salary, but this Forbes piece on a woman who retired in her 30s to wander the world is still inspiring. Thanks to a thrifty lifestyle and aggressive saving, she put away huge chunks of her salary and is now able to travel on just the dividends from her investments.

From Skyrises to Traffic Jams: Our Densely Populated Planet — in Pictures
This photo gallery from the Guardian offers an incredible view of the Earth’s people, animals and cityscapes.

Delta Flier Gets Entire 160-Seat Jet to Himself
Thanks to a delay and subsequent rebookings by other passengers, Steve Schneider found himself the only person on a Delta flight from New Orleans to Atlanta, reports USA Today. The flight took off despite its emptiness because the airline needed the plane in Atlanta for a departure the next day. All of this leaves us wondering: Why doesn’t this ever happen to us?

Inside the Fight to Save One of the World’s Most Dangerous Parks
This in-depth essay from National Geographic offers a sobering look at the struggle of conservationists to preserve Virunga National Park in war-torn Congo, home to more than half of the world’s remaining gorillas. It’s a dangerous job; 152 park rangers have been killed over the past two decades.

How ‘Brexit’ Will Affect Travel to Europe
The New York Times investigates the ramifications of the recent Brexit vote for American travelers, from cheaper airfares to potential impact on the U.S. travel industry.

What I Learned in Italy About Loving My Body
This thoughtful essay from AFAR details a woman’s journey from worrying about her weight every time she considers dessert to appreciating Italy’s culture and history by fully experiencing its cuisine.

U.S. Border Authority Seeks Travellers’ Social Media Details
Do you want the U.S. government reading your tweets? BBC reports that Customs and Border Protection (part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security) has proposed an update to visa waiver application forms that would ask applicants for their social media handles. The question would be optional.

This week’s video is a dreamy look at India’s people, places and food.


10 Best India Experiences
16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Catch up on all the news and views you may have missed in the travel world this week.

hiker taking cell phone photo


10 Ways That the Mobile Phone Has Ruined Travel
In this humorous essay from the Telegraph, the author bemoans the way cell phones have worsened the travel experience. (One example: selfies.)

Flights to Cuba Are Officially On Sale — for Under $300
Conde Nast Traveler reports that commercial flights are now officially available on the American Airlines website starting at just $262 roundtrip. Havana flights haven’t yet been approved, but you can currently book a trip to cities such as Cienfuegos or Camaguey.

How to Survive Being an Airbnb Host
Being an experienced traveler doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be a good Airbnb host, as this New York Times writer discovers when she’s given a disappointing three-star rating from her first guests.

Can You (Ethically) Go On Safari in 2016?
After spending part of his childhood in Africa, an AFAR writer returns to Kenya on safari, worrying that the experience will feel like a throwback to colonial hunting days.

Cash-Back Credit Cards Better Than Travel Cards for Most Americans, Survey Analysis Finds
In a recent survey, NerdWallet found that not all travelers are well served by travel reward cards. If you primarily travel within the U.S. and spend less than $8,600 a year, a cash-back card could be more lucrative. If you travel overseas at least once a year, though, a travel card could still be worthwhile.

Hotel Brands No Longer Sell Rooms. They Sell Experiences
CNN reports on the rising interest in “authenticity” and “something new” among travelers, particularly younger ones, and on how this is compelling hotels to change their offerings. Some are offering more communal spaces, while others are designing rooms that feature local artwork and other decor that evokes the destination where the hotel is located.

Why ‘Brexit’ Could Screw Up Your European Travel Plans
Britons vote today over whether to leave the European Union, and the ramifications of the decision could affect travelers, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Among the possible effects: Flying into London could turn into a massive headache, but Europe trips could be cheaper.

This Might Be the Best Thing to Happen to Airplane Seats
Popular Mechanics offers a look at a cool new design for business class, in which all passengers — even those in window seats — have access to the aisle. The seats will be used on United planes. (But can we get a design like this in cattle class?)

This week’s video highlights the best of Ljubljana, Slovenia’s under-the-radar capital city.


6 Pictures That Will Make You Want to Visit Slovenia
Can Americans Travel to Cuba? Yes — and Here’s How

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the most interesting travel stories you may have missed this week.

american airlines planes


American Airlines Just Made a Big Change Most Passengers Will Hate
American Airlines has fallen in line with the other major carriers in the U.S. with the latest update to its frequent flier program, reports Yahoo! Finance. Travelers will now accumulate miles based not on the distance flown but on how much they paid for their ticket.

Why I Quit My Job to Travel the World
Have a laugh at this satirical essay from the New Yorker, which pokes fun at trust fund kids who drop everything to travel around the world. “Of course, this ‘no reservations’ life style isn’t for everyone,” writes the fictional narrator. “Sometimes it’s difficult to get even one bar of cell service, which makes Instagramming more gelato a real struggle.”

The Latest Travel Luxury: Not Going
Quartz reports that there’s been an increase in the purchase of “cancel anytime” travel insurance this year, probably in response to concerns about terrorism and the Zika virus. This type of coverage costs a little more but gives travelers peace of mind by allowing them to back out of their trip for any reason without losing money.

The Moroccan Scam That Wasn’t
BBC Travel details an encounter with Moroccan locals that could have turned dangerous — would you hop in a car with two strangers to drive into the desert after dark? — but instead turned into a memorable evening at an Arab-Berber wedding.

Had a Rental Car Accident? Here’s What You Need to Know
Conde Nast Traveler digs into the thorny issue of rental car coverage. Just how much does your credit card protect you in case of an accident? Turns out it might be less than you think.

Common Taxi Scams, and How to Avoid Them
USA Today identifies seven ways you could get ripped off on a cab ride, from broken meters to drivers claiming they don’t have enough change.

Get a glimpse of Bali’s healing energy in this week’s featured video.


10 Best Indonesia Experiences
Money Safety Tips for Travelers

— written by Sarah Schlichter

With the U.S. National Park Service celebrating its centennial this year, national parks are in the spotlight — not just here in the States but around the world. We love national parks because they protect a country’s natural scenery and unique wildlife for all of us to enjoy, whether you’re driving through in a car, hiking a trail or camping in the backcountry. Check out these six national parks we want to visit around the world.

grand teton national park


Grand Teton National Park, U.S.A., offers magnificent mountain vistas.

elephants in etosha national park


On safari in Namibia’s Etosha National Park, you’ll spy lions, elephants, zebras and much more.

waterfall lamington national park


Located in Queensland, Australia, Lamington National Park encompasses miles of lush rain forest.

horses torres del paine


Torres del Paine National Park protects some of Patagonian Chile’s most stunning landscapes.

komodo dragon


Komodo National Park in Indonesia is home to the endangered Komodo dragon, along with a variety of marine wildlife.

northeast greenland national park



Northeast Greenland National Park is the world’s biggest national park, but it’s so difficult to reach that very few people actually visit it.

Planning an African Safari
National Park Vacations

Which national park tops your must-visit list?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Catch up on the travel news, photos and videos you might have missed this week.

arctic ice mountains


14-Year-Old Girl to Be Youngest Person Taking on Massive Polar Expedition
We’ve got a new travel hero. Mashable profiles 14-year-old Jade Hameister, an Australian teenager who is hoping to complete a “Polar Hat Trick” involving expeditions to the North Pole, Greenland and the South Pole over the next couple of years. She’ll be accompanied by a master polar guide and by her father, who has climbed Mt. Everest. Check out Jade’s Instagram to keep tabs on her progress.

What Will Replace the Hated Hotel ‘Resort’ Fee? Maybe This
Consumer rights advocate Christopher Elliott has unearthed an obnoxious new fee to watch out for at hotels: a “hospitality surcharge.” A traveler who found this fee on his bill at a Hilton Garden Inn in New Mexico asked what it was, and got the following ridiculous answer: “The manager said it is for the TV monitor in the lobby displaying flight departure data and the lights in the hotel.” Seriously? What’s next, a charge for the front desk or the bathroom in your room?

This Is What Air Travel Will Actually Look Like in 100 Years
Travel + Leisure sat down with two Senior Technical Fellows at Boeing to find out what’s in store over the next several decades in the air travel industry. Their predictions blew our mind — including see-through planes, airport hotels in space and the ability to book flights via a chip implanted in your brain. Here’s hoping we live long enough to see some of these.

23 Incredible Pictures of Kenya
Rough Guides shows us the many sides of Kenya, from the cosmopolitan center of Nairobi to a camel derby in the hillside down of Maralal. Particularly striking are portraits of members of the Turkana, Samburu and Pokot tribes.

Why Are Americans So Afraid of Vacation?
The Boston Globe investigates a disturbing trend among Americans: not using all our vacation days. A couple of studies reveal that on average we give up four to five days a year. Even when we do take a trip, 61 percent of us still work at least a little bit during our vacation. But here’s why we shouldn’t: “Skipping vacation stifles creativity, creates health problems [and] leads to stress, depression, and less-than-ideal home lives,” says the Globe.

Airbnb to Purge Illegal Hotels from San Francisco Listings
For years Airbnb has faced legal challenges from cities concerned that the site’s hosts were violating their local short-term housing laws. Now the San Francisco Chronicle reports that the site is taking action against hosts who manage multiple listings in the City by the Bay. (San Francisco only allows residents to rent out space in their own home.)

Hamlet’s Kronborg Castle in Denmark Is on Airbnb for One Night Only to Mark Shakespeare Anniversary
Speaking of Airbnb, here’s a cool (and legal) listing: Hamlet’s castle. Lonely Planet reports that Kronborg Castle in Denmark will be open to two guests only on the night of April 23, the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Interested travelers must hit “contact host” on the Airbnb listing by April 13 and explain why they want to sleep in the castle. Included in your stay: a special banquet and breakfast in bed served by Hamlet’s friend Horatio.

Don’t miss this jaw-dropping timelapse video of the northern lights in Norway.


Beware These Hidden Hotel Fees
Airbnb and Beyond: Tips for Safe, Legal Vacation Rentals

— written by Sarah Schlichter

traveler in wheelchair waiting for a trainCatch up on what’s new and nifty with our weekly travel roundup.

Accomable: Could This Airbnb-Style Service Revolutionize Disability Travel?
CNN reports on a new website called Accomable, which helps disabled travelers find accessible lodging in destinations around the world. It was launched by two passionate travelers with disabilities, who wanted to make exploring the world easier for others with similar challenges.

Airline Complaints Spike Even as Service Improves
By many measures, the airlines are actually getting better these days (hard as it may be to believe). USA Today reports that more flights are arriving on time, with fewer lost bags and fewer passengers being bumped from full flights. Despite these improvements, however, passenger grievances are on the rise, particularly complaints from people with disabilities.

In Pictures: An Introduction to Guinea Bissau
The West African nation of Guinea Bissau isn’t on many travelers’ radar — but this photo essay from Rough Guides just might intrigue you enough to start planning a visit.

JetBlue Asks Flyers to ‘Reach Across the Aisle’ in Election-Year Stunt
As the 2016 U.S. presidential election gets increasingly contentious, JetBlue is attempting to bring us all together in the spirit of travel. Adweek highlights a recent publicity stunt, er, video, in which the airline gives away free tickets to an entire plane full of people, as long as they can make a unanimous choice about where to go. (Their eventual pick? Costa Rica.)

Comparing Airbnb and Hotel Rates Around the Globe
In case you’ve ever wondered whether booking a vacation rental would save you money over a hotel, the answer is yes — at least in some of the cities where Busbud compared rates. The site found that Airbnb could save you the most in London, where the average rental is more than $108 cheaper than the average hotel. At the other end of the spectrum is Barcelona, where hotels cost $139 less on average.

Why United Airlines Is Retraining All of Its Pilots
Travel + Leisure reports that all 12,000 United pilots will go through a retraining program in which the most senior pilots will serve as mentors for less experienced members of the team.

This week’s featured video captures the frozen wonderland that is Finland in winter, including snow-laden tree branches, bounding sled dogs, and even Santa Claus and a reindeer.


— written by Sarah Schlichter

March 1 marks the 80th anniversary of the completion of the Hoover Dam — the engineering marvel on the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada. Aside from its primary job of preventing floods and providing water to millions of people, the Hoover Dam is also a major tourist attraction. Some 7 million visitors tour the dam annually.

hoover dam


Aside from the Hoover Dam — which, in my opinion, is far more interesting than actually spending time in nearby Las Vegas — here are five other dams that are attractive to travelers:

Luzzone Dam, Switzerland: Adventurists flock to this high-altitude, 540-foot-tall dam on the Swiss-Italian border for one reason: to conquer one of the world’s tallest artificial climbing walls. A German company affixed one side of the dam with hundreds of climbing bolts and holds. The YouTube video below shows what the acrophobic climbing experience is like.


Grand Coulee Dam, Washington, U.S.: Nightly summertime laser light shows projected onto the dam’s wall make Grand Coulee, about 1.5 hours from Spokane, a fun destination for travelers. The surrounding Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area is popular for boating, swimming and camping. The free light shows run from Memorial Day through September 30 each year.

Aswan High Dam, Egypt: Threatened by floods, more than 20 temples in the vicinity of Lake Nasser had to be removed and painstakingly rebuilt elsewhere to make way for this Nile River dam system, which controls flooding. UNESCO supervised the moves, and several of the temples were relocated to other countries that supported the effort. The best known is the Temple of Dendur, which is now housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

grand dixence dam


Grande Dixence Dam, Switzerland: Another high-altitude Swiss dam, this one, in the Val d’Herens Valley, is a popular starting point for hikers. This is considered the world’s highest gravity dam, and its reservoir is completely fed by melting water from 35 glaciers. Guided tours and cable car rides are available.

Almendra Dam, Spain: Also called the Villarino Dam, the Alemendra Dam is one of Spain’s tallest manmade structures at 663 feet high. It provides hydroelectric power to a great wine-growing region known as the Douro River Valley, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s worth a quick photographic detour when visiting the charming university town of Salamanca.

The World’s 9 Most Gorgeous Gardens
The Best Cities to See Cool Public Art

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

cinque terre italyRead up on our favorite stories from the travel world this week.

The Italian Villages So Popular You Will Now Need a TICKET to Visit Them
The Daily Mail reports that Cinque Terre, a collection of five famously charming coastal villages in Italy, is so overwhelmed by travelers that it will be limiting them in 2016. This past year 2.5 million people visited the site, but the 2016 total will be capped at 1.5 million, with advance tickets sold online.

How to Avoid Getting Counterfeit Money When You Travel
Counterfeit money may not be something you usually worry about when you travel, but Forbes reports that it may be more common than you’d expect in some parts of the world. This comprehensive article advises travelers to get money from ATMs associated with banks (rather than those at shopping malls or in standalone locations) and to check for things like blurred ink or flimsy paper when receiving change.

25 Amazing Images from This Year’s Travel Photographer of the Year Awards
Feast your eyes on this collection of travel photos from Rough Guides, ranging from intimate portraits of local people to a staggering shot of what may be the world’s most crowded swimming pool.

Advice for Avoiding Costly Airline Fees for Changing Plans
If you’ve booked a nonrefundable plane ticket — as most of us do — you could pay up to $200 (plus fare differences) if you need to change your plans. The Associated Press offers a few tips to help you avoid change fees, including booking with one of the few airlines that don’t charge such fees.

Behind the Masks in West Africa
CNN offers a fascinating slideshow from a photo series called “Woongo, Behind the Masks,” in which Tunisian artist Selim Harbi took pictures of West African people wearing traditional masks in an attempt to provide a different perspective on the way Africa is typically represented in the media.

These German Vacationers Don’t Take Kindly to the Kinder
The Wall Street Journal reports on a new trend in German luxury hotels: banning children. The story quotes one traveler who says, “I feel annoyed by the mere presence of children. Their running around, their loudness, their parents — it creates a tense atmosphere.” Hotels have limited their guests to adults only in an attempt to create tranquility.

This week’s video needs a warning for excessive cuteness. Behold: a polar bear at the Toronto Zoo seeing snow for the first time.

Polar bear cub sees snow for the first time!

Take a look at our polar bear cub seeing snow for the first time! ❄ #TOpolarbearcub

Posted by The Toronto Zoo on Friday, February 12, 2016


Photos: 11 Best Italy Experiences
The Best and Worst Days to Fly

— written by Sarah Schlichter

gubeikou great wall of chinaIt’s that time of the week! Catch up on all the great travel stories you may have missed over the past seven days.

Walking the Great Wall’s Wild Side
This engaging story from the Alaska Airlines blog details a hiking adventure along an unrestored section of the Great Wall of China. Along the way the writer befriends three local women and tests his own bravery in the face of narrow paths and precipitous ledges.

Air Emergencies: Are Airlines Telling You What You Need to Know?
Canada’s CBC News reports that many airline safety briefings leave out a key bit of information that could save your life in a crash. A safety researcher quoted in the article says that using the brace position (in which you stabilize your body by bending over with your head against the seat in front of you) can “reduce severity of injuries” and “reduce deaths.” The position is illustrated on the safety card in your seatback pocket but often not mentioned in safety videos or live demonstrations by flight attendants.

How Scientists Are ‘Hacking’ the Body to Override Jet Lag
Could flashing lights help cure jet lag? That’s the latest from Conde Nast Traveler, which reports on a new study that tested short flashes of light administered 10 seconds apart while study participants were sleeping. This treatment is believed to help the brain acclimate more quickly to time changes.

Nanyuki: The Kenyan Town Where Your Valentine’s Roses Are Grown
We had no idea until we read this Rough Guides article that Kenya was a key supplier of roses to the European Union. The writer profiles the market town of Nanyuki, an expat hub with a perfect climate for growing flowers.

Minimum Airline Seat Standards Could Become Law
Traveler advocate Christopher Elliott brings welcome news in a post on LinkedIn, writing about a recently proposed Congressional bill that would establish a minimum size for airplane seats (which seem to be shrinking by the day). We’re keeping our fingers crossed!

Life in Paris’s 10th and 11th Arrondissements, 3 Months After the Attacks
New York Magazine interviews a number of locals in the areas of Paris most affected by November’s terrorist attacks, from a rapper who wrote a song about the tragedy to a restaurant owner trying to move past her anxiety.

A Robot Butler Is Replacing Humans in Some California Hotels
The next time you ring the front desk staff to ask if they have a spare toothbrush, you might find the real-life equivalent of R2-D2 bringing it to your door. Business Insider reports on a growing trend of robots in hotels, with about a dozen properties now employing them in California.

This week’s video features droolworthy footage from the Norwegian fjords, where a dedicated young guitarist hauled his instrument up to a few of the region’s most spectacular overlooks.


Top Tips for Fighting Jet Lag
The Best and Worst Days to Fly

— written by Sarah Schlichter