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gomadic sunvolt solar chargerDo you know someone who’s always on the road or in the air? You could gift that person with the standard inflatable pillow, ear plugs or luggage, but why not surprise him or her with the true comforts and conveniences of home instead? These items are practical and perfect for use on long international trips, from the plane to the hotel and everywhere in between.

KnowRoaming
This is the answer to every international traveler’s biggest problem: roaming charges. KnowRoaming is a prepaid data sticker that attaches to your phone (in a one-time application) and automatically switches to a local provider upon arrival in a new country. You can pay as you go (rates vary by country) and easily manage usage in the app so there aren’t any surprises; for heavy users, unlimited plans are also available for $7.99 per day. A bonus: Your actual phone number shows up when making calls.

Note: Before you buy this for a friend or family member, make sure you know what type of phone he or she has. KnowRoaming doesn’t operate on Blackberries or CDMA phones. Also, phones must be unlocked prior to a trip — this means network restrictions need to be removed so the phone can operate with a different SIM card. Check KnowRoaming.com for restrictions and guidelines by carrier.

Approximate Cost: $30

Gomadic SunVolt
You’ve heard of multi-device chargers that don’t require outlets (if they’ve already been charged by one, of course), but Gomadic SunVolt doesn’t require outlets at any point. Why? It’s powered by solar energy. Up to two devices can charge at a time, and additional lithium polymer batteries can be purchased to store excess energy for nighttime charges.

Approximate Cost: $100

Christmas Markets: Europe and Beyond

Olloclip 4-in-1 Lens System
Maybe your giftee doesn’t want to lug a big camera and multiple lenses around during a three-week tour of Europe. Instead, consider the gift of an Olloclip 4-in1 Lens System (for iPhones). It offers four views: fish-eye, wide-angle and two macro options. It easily clips on to iPhones and comes with two lens caps and a carrying case.

Approximate Cost: $70

Kikkerland Music Branch 3-Way Headphone Splitter
There’s no need to share a set of headphones with this nifty, inexpensive gadget, ideal for traveling duos or trios. This earphone splitter offers three inputs so two or three people can watch a movie or listen to music together on a laptop (rather than squint at those small airplane screens). It’s also useful for couples with napping youngsters in tow.

Approximate Cost: $10

Satechi USB Portable Humidifier v.1
The Satechi USB Portable Humidifier connects to a water bottle and moistens dry air in hotel rooms (or even at home between trips) — perfect for rehydrating your nose and sinuses after a long-haul flight. When filled with cold water, it also acts as a mister to cool you off on hot days. Other functions include dim lighting for nighttime and aroma diffusing — just add liquid fragrances. To operate, plug into a USB port; it automatically shuts off after eight hours.

Approximate Cost: $30

Escape the Cold: 8 Warm Weather Winter Vacations

– written by Amanda Geronikos

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two destinations with a pink theme.

Would you rather…

… check out the pastel-colored architecture in sunny Oranjestad, Aruba

aruba pink architecture



… see thousands of flamingos in Lake Nakuru, Kenya?

flamingos lake nakuru kenya


Aruba’s cheery capital city, Oranjestad, is known for its pastel-colored Dutch architecture. Kenya’s Lake Nakuru National Park is home to some 450 bird species, including the greater and lesser flamingo.

Planning an African Safari

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

This week’s brainteaser is a Friday Word Puzzle. We’ll give you a category and the first letters of five countries that fall into that category, and you fill in the rest. Keep in mind that there may be more than one possible response for each letter. For examples, check out this blog post.

Ready to give it a try? Here’s this week’s challenge:

index card puzzle


Enter your list of countries in the comments below. You have until Monday, November 17, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Ginger, who has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Congratulations! Check out the winning entry below.

natural heritage sites


Stay tuned for further chances to win!

– created by Dori Saltzman

Every so often, when I’m stuck at home between trips and need a little jolt of wanderlust, I wander over to Vimeo.com and go hunting for travel videos. If I can’t be exploring a new place right now, at least I can spend a few minutes living vicariously through someone else’s footage. And there’s no better inspiration for future trips!

For example, check out this dreamy time-lapse video of the midnight sun in Iceland — I guarantee you’ll want to go.



Also shot in Europe but with an entirely different mood and focus is “Barcelona GO!”, which takes viewers on a frenetic trip around this colorful Spanish city, from narrow medieval lanes to grand cathedrals and concert halls:



This video set in India is so vivid I can practically taste the curry:



I’m ending with my favorite — a gorgeous, contemplative look at Japan in wintertime. Keep an eye out for the Jigokudani snow monkeys.



3 Time-Lapse Videos to Get You in the Mood for Traveling

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Some branding partnerships are questionable — Justin Bieber and perfume, Taco Bell and Doritos — but Pantone’s decision to create a hotel in Brussels just makes sense. Pantone, considered a leading authority on color, built its Belgian hotel in 2010 and as we read up in this post on Fast Company magazine’s website, the rooms are, well, colorful.

pantone room


The Pantone Hotel was designed by architect Olivier Hannaert and decorated by interior designer Michel Penneman. The design is minimalist, but the touches of color extend from a curated photo series for each of the 59 rooms by Belgian photographer Victor Levy to coffee cups, bicycles, even the toilet paper. Stretches of hallway may be tangerine, and here, accent blankets are always intentional.

pantone hotel


9 Amazing Upscale Hostels

toilet paper at Pantone hotel


Part of a larger concept for the company known as Pantone Universe, the hotel is just part of the color swatch experts’ takeover of all things under the rainbow. A color of the year has been selected annually since 2000, and in a partnership with Sephora, a makeup line is created to play up the shade of the year. (You only have one more month to bathe in radiant orchid, or Pantone color 18-3224, before 2015 washes it away.) Online, the number of Pantone-related products colors the spectrum — if you need to brighten your day, visit their website. We’re not sure if the concept will ever become a chain, but if you’re in Brussels and want to experiment with how color might change your mood, the Pantone Hotel has a very specific number and letter for that.

6 More Sweet Hotels in Brussels

breakfast at Pantone hotel


Inspired by Pantone’s imaginative entry into hospitality, which other brands or products would you like to see with overnight accommodations? I think an [insert your favorite brand of coffee here] hotel would allow guests to at least be caffeinated, if not well rested. Share your ideas in the comments.

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

selfieMaybe you’ve landed on a glacier in Alaska, ridden a donkey in Greece or hiked to a mountaintop monastery in Tibet. Whatever the experience, it’s likely you’ve got photos to share or, at the very least, stories to tell. The question is: Should you?

With selfie rates at an all-time high and social media apps like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter just a tap away, it’s tough to exercise restraint when you’re excited about your once-in-a-lifetime trip. According to a recent New York Times article, though, your friends might not be quite as excited about your exploits as you are; if you’re not careful, your posts could be considered bragging.

For me, Facebook mainly functions as a storage facility for my photos. From there, they’re easy to find and reference, should I need to pull one of them for a story. I try my best not to caption them with anything other than facts, and you’ll rarely — if ever — see me posting photos of myself individually. Has anyone ever asked me to stop posting travel albums? No. Do people secretly want me to? Possibly.

If you’re one of those people, there are some quick and easy solutions: 1) Hide my content. I’ll never know. 2) Unfriend me. If my (infrequent) posts are that bothersome to you, we probably shouldn’t be friends anyway.

16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

To those who actually do brag about their travel adventures, please stop ruining it for the rest of us. You’re as bad as people who take photos of every single piece of food they eat, let the world know that they’re at the gym by posting endless workout selfies or update their statuses whenever their children get sick … or say a new word … or use the bathroom. #obnoxious #reallyobnoxious #almostasobnoxiousaspeoplewhohashtageverythingfornoreason

When it comes to sharing about your travels on social media, what’s your take? Do you post, or do you keep your experiences to yourself? Be sure to leave your comments below.

– written by Ashley Kosciolek

Today’s post is part of a weekly series called “Travel Toss-Up,” in which we ask you to take your pick between two amazing travel experiences.

This week’s toss-up offers a choice of two religious buildings in incredible locations.

When traveling, would you rather…

… explore a floating mosque in Malaysia, or …

kota kinabalu floating mosque malaysia



… visit a clifftop monastery in Greece?

monastery of the holy trinity meteora greece


Malaysia is home to several mosques built over the water to give them the appearance of floating. The one above is in Kota Kinabalu. In Meteora, Greece, visitors can check out a half-dozen spectacular monasteries built atop massive rocks. Shown here is the Holy Trinity Monastery, which can be reached via a steep uphill hike. (If you’re not up to the physical challenge, visit the more accessible St. Stephen’s Monastery instead.)

9 Places You Haven’t Visited — But Should

Vote for your preference in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: There’s a lot to be thankful for at this tiny, historic settlement.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, November 10, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Michelle T, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was Plimouth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Michelle has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

eatsmart digital luggage scaleIf you’ve ever gotten to the check-in desk at the airport and been alarmed to discover that your suitcase was overweight, there’s an easy solution: a luggage scale.

While you can always try putting your suitcase on your bathroom scale at home, a luggage scale is an easier and more accurate way to see just how heavy your bag is. As a bonus, you can take it with you on your trip too, so before you head home, you can weigh your bag in your hotel room to figure out whether all those souvenirs you bought will push you over your airline’s weight limit.

We recently took EatSmart’s Precision Voyager Digital Luggage Scale for a spin. The scale is easy to use, with a simple on/off button and a “UNIT” button that toggles between pounds and kilograms.

To weigh your bag, you attach the scale to your suitcase handle using a sturdy strap and buckle. Then you lift the bag for a few seconds until the scale offers a digital reading. It helps that the scale’s handle is big enough for both hands; that makes it easier to lift a heavy bag for the few seconds it takes the scale to display the weight. The scale can handle up to 110 pounds (50 kilograms).

You may be tempted to pack your bag all the way up to the 50-pound limit (which is when most airline overweight fees start kicking in). However, we’d recommend leaving yourself a couple of extra pounds — not only to pack the scale itself, as EatSmart recommends, but also to allow for variation between the scale’s readings and those of the scale at the airport. When we weighed the same bag several times, we got different readings from the Precision Voyager, ranging from 10.9 – 11.2 pounds for an empty suitcase and 28.5 – 28.8 pounds for a full one. Best to leave a little room for error.

7 Smart Ways to Bypass Baggage Fees

The scale is currently selling on Amazon.com for $19.95 plus shipping. Want to win one for yourself? Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Monday, November 17, 2014. We’ll pick two people at random to win a luggage scale. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

two guy fawkes masksJust three months after the September 11 terrorist attacks, an Englishman named Richard Reid boarded an American Airlines flight from Paris to Miami with a bomb in his shoe. Luckily, Reid was subdued by fellow passengers before he could detonate the bomb; the plane landed safely and Reid was brought to justice. So why don’t we celebrate December 22, 2001 as a national holiday? If you’re wondering why a thwarted act of terrorism would warrant its own holiday, look no further than Guy Fawkes Day, recognized on November 5 with bonfires, fireworks and burning effigies across the United Kingdom.

While a dozen other Catholic dissidents were equally involved in the “gunpowder plot” to blow up the Houses of Parliament, with the goal of killing King James I, only one man — Guy Fawkes — was caught in the cellar with 36 barrels of gunpowder on the morning of November 5, 1605. In honor of avoiding such an elaborate assassination attempt, Parliament later declared the day to be one of national thanksgiving and to this day, more than four centuries later, citizens are still celebrating Bonfire Night — festivities that originally carried an anti-Catholic sentiment.

These days the holiday has lost most of its initial intentions and is used as more of an excuse to set off fireworks, burn effigies of your least favorite politician or celebrity, and drink mulled wine than it is to give thanks that lives were saved hundreds of years ago (albeit lives of men who supported religious intolerance). I can only imagine that kids in the 21st century, dazzled by fireworks displays and amusement park rides, spare little thought for the original reasons behind the revelry.

State of Independence: Traveling During Local Holidays

For many around the world, Guy Fawkes is actually celebrated as a heroic figure whose visage is worn as a mask at global anti-government rallies including Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street. In recent years, an online activist movement called Anonymous has taken to the streets on Guy Fawkes Day with a Million Mask March to protest against current government. This year, the movement has planned 463 rallies worldwide. And of course Hollywood can never resist adding to the historical confusion, and did exactly that when they painted Guy Fawkes as a mysterious protagonist against a dystopian regime in the 2005 film “V for Vendetta” (based on the graphic novels from the 1980s).

Guy Fawkes Day isn’t the first holiday whose genesis is so buried in tradition that its meaning has largely been lost on recent generations. Memorial Day wasn’t created for barbecues, and Presidents Day isn’t just for sales — everyone needs an excuse to blow off some steam, but at what expense? So why should we “remember, remember, the fifth of November”? I think if we could rebrand the day to reflect a special effort between government and the people to bring important issues to the table, then there would be a continued reason to celebrate.

– written by Brittany Chrusciel