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You need a vacation — but if you haven’t settled on a destination and your travel dates are flexible, it can be difficult to find the best possible deal. Enter Fareness.com, a flight search website that launched last year.

fareness screenshot

While most travel search sites ask you to put in your preferred travel dates (plus or minus up to a few days), Fareness offers larger blocks of travel dates — such as “Next 2 weeks only” or “All of December.” You can select more than one option if you want to search, say, October through January. Enter your departure airport and a trip length of anywhere from 3 to 17 days, and the site will show you fares to destinations around the world.

You can filter your destination results by region (such as Europe or U.S. cities) or theme (beach, popular, family). The results are displayed both on a map and in a Pinterest-style tile layout featuring large, beautiful photos of each destination.

We plugged in Los Angeles as our departure city and came up with some pretty eye-popping fares, including $458 roundtrip to Bangkok and $114 to Chicago, including taxes. (The site lists these as discounts of more than 60 percent over typical fares on these routes.) When you decide on a city and click on it, the site shows a calendar of when the lowest fares are available. Choose your dates and you’re taken to a screen where you can select your outbound and return flights.

The flight selection screen was a little confusing at first, but I eventually figured out that the blue bars under each itinerary represent both the length of the flight and the time of day that you’ll be traveling. You can filter results by departure time, number of stops, airline and airport. Once you choose your flights, Fareness directs you to Priceline to make your booking.

I checked a few of the prices I found on Fareness against those on Kayak for similar itineraries and dates, and discovered that in some cases the fares were the same, while in others Kayak or Fareness was cheaper by a few dollars. This leads me to an unsurprising and time-tested conclusion: You should never book a flight without checking multiple sites.

That said, Fareness is a valuable resource for travelers in the early stages of trip planning who haven’t settled on a destination and/or exact travel dates. While Kayak has a somewhat similar search feature (you type in your home airport and the season or month you want to travel), Fareness offered a more comprehensive calendar of results.

The bottom line? I’ll be adding Fareness to my own personal travel toolkit. Check it out at Fareness.com.

10 Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare
7 Mistakes to Avoid When Booking a Flight

— written by Sarah Schlichter

A few years ago, we conducted a Travel Pillow Challenge, road testing four unusual accessories to help you sleep better on long-haul flights. Back then, we thought some of the pillows were pretty weird looking — remember the giant inflatable apostrophe that looked more like a beauty pageant sash than a pillow?

But, oh my, the embarrassment factor has grown so much since then. Check out these awkward-looking travel pillows for flights.

ostrich pillow

Ostrich Pillow
Nothing says chic like a giant pillow that looks like a vintage deep sea diver helmet. At least the makers of the plush Ostrich Pillow have a sense of humor and play up the ridiculousness of this $99 sweat factory in photos on their website. I’ve never seen anyone wearing this on a flight, but I’d definitely tweet a pic of him or her if I did. Buy it at OstrichPillow.com or Amazon.

little cloud nine travel pillow

Little Cloud Nine Travel Pillow
I’m not sure if this blow-up device was invented by someone looking to catch a few Zs on an airplane or by a member of the Witness Protection Program. The device is said to provide stability to your neck and prevent your head from bobbing forward. It also makes the person in the middle seat so utterly afraid to ask if they could slide by to use the restroom that they’ll hold it in for the duration of your long-haul flight. Buy it at CloudNinePillow.com or at Amazon.


The HoodiePillow
Really want to convey the “don’t talk to me” message to your seatmate? Wrap this inflatable U-shaped pillow around your neck and draw up the attached hood. For maximum passive-aggressiveness, pull the drawstring so tight that only your nose and mouth appear. Buy it at HoodiePillow.com or Amazon.

skyrest travel pillow

SkyRest Travel Pillow
It’s like propping a recycling bin on your tray table! As large as many carry-on bags, this inflatable pillow supposedly counters the natural tendency of your head to fall forward when you sleep. It also requires that you ask the person next to you to hold your drink and your iPad and your snacks. Buy it at SkyRest.com or Amazon.

How to Sleep Better on Planes
11 Things Not to Do on a Plane

Would you try any of these pillows?

–written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

This week’s puzzle is a country shapes quiz! Take a look at the silhouette and below and tell us which country you think it is.

mystery country

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, October 3, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Bill Gallant, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery country was Egypt. Bill has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

— created by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed in the travel world this week.

angry man at airport

Unruly Airline Passengers Up Worldwide, But Down in U.S.
USA Today reports on a rising trend: airline passengers behaving badly. The International Air Transport Association saw nearly 11,000 reports of unruly air travelers in 2015, up from 9,316 incidents the year before. Such incidents involved verbal abuse, aggression against other passengers, failure to follow crew instructions and more; many also involved alcohol.

Craving a Life Reset? Meet the Woman Who Went Down Under to Start Over
This essay from AFAR details the physical and emotional journey of writer Maggie MacKellar, who moved from Sydney to a New South Wales farm and finally to remote Tasmania in the wake of two major losses. Maggie must learn to live in the sometimes harsh, insular world of a Tasmanian sheep farm.

In Pictures: Brushing Shoulders with Bears in Finland’s Newest National Park
We love these Rough Guides snapshots of Hossa, a wilderness area that will become Finland’s 40th national park next year. Bears, reindeer and pristine hiking trails are among the sights visitors will see.

It’s Cheaper to Travel with My Daughter for a Year Than to Live at Home
An Australian mom shares her experience of traveling around Asia with her 6-year-old daughter for 12 months. She tells the Huffington Post that it’s actually less expensive to live on the road than it is to stay home in Sydney, which has a much higher cost of living.

Fly-Along Companions Offer a Way for Older People to Travel
Most of us never want to be too old to travel, and a new trend offers some hope. The New York Times reports that a growing number of agencies are popping up to provide paid companions that can help older travelers navigate airports and manage travel logistics.

The World’s Oldest Library Gets a 21st-Century Facelift
CNN takes us inside the al-Qarawiyyin Library in Fez, Morocco, which opened in the year 859 and is believed to be the oldest library on the planet. In the face of extensive water damage, the library is currently being refurbished and is expected to open to the public next year.

Starwood-Marriott Merger: Your Loyalty Program Questions, Answered
If you belong to a Starwood or Marriott loyalty program and aren’t sure how the merger of the two companies will affect you, don’t miss this Q&A from Conde Nast Traveler.

This week’s video takes a look at the daily life of the Nepalese people a year after an earthquake devastated the area.

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Each month, we’ll highlight one new trip review submitted by an IndependentTraveler.com reader. If your review is featured, you’ll win an IndependentTraveler.com logo item!

ushguli village shkhara peak georgia

In this month’s winning review, a traveler experiences remarkable hospitality on a trekking journey to the country of Georgia: “On my first full day in Tbilisi, I was lucky to be invited to the hostel’s birthday celebration for one of its owner’s friends,” writes Marinel de Jesus. “I was offered a taste of the local cuisine and experienced a wonderful merging of cultures when a fellow hostel resident played a traditional musical instrument from Iran as a way to celebrate the occasion. In Georgia, there is not much of a line between a stranger and a friend/family.”

Read the rest of Marinel’s review here: The Republic of Georgia Brings You Mountains & Unparalled Hospitality. This reader has won an IndependentTraveler.com sweatshirt.

Feeling inspired? Write your own trip review!

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Thanks to my perfectionist ways, I tend to do pretty well in airports. I arrive early, wear slip-on shoes that are easy to get on and off at security, organize my carry-on items well and constantly check the departure board for changes related to my flight.

But in the same way some travelers are always on the prowl for discounted getaways, my travel obsession of late is studying new strategies to master the airport experience. Fortunately, there are others out there like me, and they’ve shared their tips to hack your way through the airport.

woman looking at airport departure board

Here are five tips and recommendations that I’ve found particularly useful lately:

Take screengrabs of your mobile boarding pass: This great article on the New Zealand website Stuff reminded me how finicky some apps can be — and that Murphy’s law dictates they’ll give you the most problems when you’re just about to approach the security officer in line at the airport. Avoid such problems by taking a screengrab of your boarding pass and displaying that. Chances are, it’s much easier to open your phone’s photos folder than to count on an airline’s app to work exactly when you need it to.

Pack an outlet splitter in your carry-on: There’s nothing more frustrating than needing desperately to charge your phone at the airport but finding all the outlets are occupied. Insider smartly suggests packing an outlet splitter, which turns one outlet into two. Then you just ask another tethered device addict to share the outlet and you both get to charge up. Outlet splitters cost just a few dollars and are widely available.

Download airport apps: I have plenty of airline apps on my phone, along with GateGuru, but I never thought to download apps for the airports themselves. Airplane News’ 10 Common Mistakes You’re Making at the Airport reminded me to download the airport apps too. I found this especially useful on a recent trip to seek out a decent place to eat and find an alternate restroom when the one near my gate was closed for cleaning.

Tune in to your brainwaves: In the recent Inc. article 10 Tips From Travel Experts, Flight Attendants and Other Frequent Fliers, an executive in South Carolina recommends a noise reduction and stress relief app called Brain Wave, and I’m absolutely hooked. Not only is it great for chilling out on the plane, but I also find it helps me deal with the anxious masses at the gate.

Pick airport security lines to the left: I should have known this because I’m left-handed, but somehow it slipped my mind: Because most people are right-handed, they tend to gravitate to the right-side security lines. So it’s likely the lines to the left will be shorter, according to our own 18 Best Airport Hacks. This tip has been around for a while, but it’s still holding fast and true.

What’s your best airport hack?

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster
10 Things Not to Do at Airport Security

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

This week’s puzzle is a word scramble. Below are the jumbled names of four major cities from around the world, followed by the country where they’re located. Your job is to unscramble them. For example, “IALM, EURP” would be “Lima, Peru.” Identify all four mystery cities to win.





Enter your list of unscrambled cities in the comments below. You have until Monday, September 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Mabyn Morgan, who has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Check out the puzzle answers below.





— created by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed around the travel world this week.

airline pilot

17 Questions You’ve Always Wanted To Ask Your Airline Pilot
GQ sits down with British Airways airline pilot Mark Vanhoenacker to chat about how often he uses autopilot, which languages pilots speak with air traffic controllers and where the best place is to watch airplanes land.

Voyages: Visual Journeys by Six Photographers
Feast your eyes on these photos from the New York Times Magazine, taken in six different countries (Ethiopia, Albania, Australia, Finland, Peru and Spain). There’s a mini-essay from each photographer to provide context for the images.

10 Reasons to See More of Rwanda Than Just the Gorillas
Most tourists think of gorillas when they think of Rwanda (if they think of the country as a travel destination at all). Rough Guides encourages a broader view, touting Rwanda’s other attractions, such as performances of traditional dance, stunning hiking trails, a vibrant capital and the chance to bike with the country’s national team.

Americans Have Now Paid Enough in Checked Bag Fees to Buy Any U.S. Airline
Thrillist ran the numbers and discovered that U.S. carriers have collected more than $26.2 billion in checked bag fees — enough to buy just about any American airline outright.

Purple Drinks and Chicken Spas: A Spicy Thai Homestay
We loved reading this vivid National Geographic account of a three-night homestay in a small Thai village. The reporter immerses himself in local life by learning to prepare Thai food, enjoying a unique “spa” treatment and watching the Thai version of “The Price Is Right.”

On Smithsonian Museum Day, Visit More Than 1,200 Museums for Free
Conde Nast Traveler gives us a timely heads up: This Saturday, more than 1,200 museums across the U.S. will be opening their doors for free as part of a Smithsonian initiative. (The Smithsonian museums in Washington D.C. are, of course, free at all times.)

Reporter Returns to Haiti and Finds Cherished Hotel Shuttered
An NPR correspondent mourns the closing of the Villa Creole near Port-au-Prince in Haiti, where he stayed on multiple occasions (including the 2010 earthquake).

This week’s video had us swooning over Western Canada’s wide-open vistas and lush hiking trails.

11 Best Canada Experiences
A Pilot Speaks Out: What You Don’t Know About Flying

— written by Sarah Schlichter

“Will we have to dress up?”

That’s the question — more like a whine — that I hear from my husband every time we plan a trip. Don will suit up when he needs to, but he associates jackets with work and clients and meetings, not relaxing and traveling.

Nonetheless, many vacations include at least one time to get fancy. Think cruises, weddings, a milestone dinner, a theater performance. But finding the space to pack dress clothes and keep them looking nice can be a problem when you’re looking to save space.

skyroll spinner

Enter the SkyRoll Spinner. This spinner suitcase meets most airlines’ carry-on size limits when packed (22 x 14 x 9 inches) but has the extra feature of a garment bag that clips onto the side and wraps around it. There’s also an included toiletries satchel. The inside of the garment bag has slots for folded dress shirts and ties, and the top of the carry-on has a compartment that the company designed to store the toiletry bag, but could also be a clever place to put shoes to keep them separate from your clothes. Seems like the perfect bag for the stylish traveler on the go. Right?

Well, maybe. The SkyRoll website notes that the bag is mostly designed for women, and that the size of the garment bag — 19 by 55 inches — makes it unsuitable for men’s jackets above size 40. My husband is 6’5″. While he liked the way the garment bag snapped onto the bag, it wasn’t wide enough for his dinner jacket, so he had to bend the edges to make it fit — not exactly what you want to keep it pressed. My dresses, which are smaller, were a better fit.

We discovered that the top compartment would work for shoes if your feet aren’t too big. (My women’s size 9.5 shoes went in fine; Don’s size 12 shoes were too large.) Don appreciated the thoughtful pockets in the garment bag, as well as the ease of rolling. If he didn’t already have a dopp kit, he would have gladly used the SkyRoll version, which comes with a hook to hang over the bathroom door.

What We Liked: The bag is ideal for the average-sized person who wants a comprehensive solution for a business trip or a short weekend escape. The top compartment itself is a joy for the organizer, with a glasses pocket and slots for cards and a pen in the top. If you don’t need the compartment, you can zip it out and use the extra space for the rest of your clothes.

What We Didn’t Like: If you’re tall with broad shoulders, this isn’t the bag you’re looking for.

Bottom Line: For most travelers, the SkyRoll Spinner solves the problem of keeping a jacket or dress neat and separate from the rest of your clothes. We’d recommend it for a shorter trip — say, a wedding weekend or a quick business trip — and for a shorter person.

Choosing the Right Travel Luggage

The SkyRoll Spinner weighs 10 pounds and sells for $299.99 on the SkyRoll website. The site also offers a carry-on with rolling (rather than spinning) wheels, a garment bag and a toiletry bag. For the next month, SkyRoll is offering a special coupon code for IndependentTraveler.com readers. Use IT916 to save 15 percent on any purchase through October 21, 2016.

Want a chance to win our gently used SkyRoll Spinner? We’re giving it away. Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, October 5, 2016. We’ll pick one winner at random to win the SkyRoll Spinner. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

The Ultimate Guide to Travel Packing

— written by Chris Gray Faust

The last minutes of summer are ticking away, with just two days left until the official start of autumn. So while the final countdown is on, I count down for you a batch of intriguing things in the world of travel that will help you decide where to go this fall (and winter), and how to get there in the smartest possible way.

autumn road

10 Transport Apps to Help You Get Around
A technology reporter for the Guardian reveals his picks for the best 10 apps to help you navigate various transportation options. While the article is U.K.-centric, most of the apps are applicable to other cities around the world.

9 New Hotels Worthy of Your Instagram Account
Vogue magazine runs down nine new properties around the world that are chic enough to appear as a square image in your social media feed, including an artistic enclave on the beach in Nicaragua. Perhaps one will be on your travel list for this fall?

8 Adventurous Ski Holidays for 2016-17
Are you a skier? These are the hottest (coldest?) ski experiences in the world this coming season, according to the Guardian. Heliskiing in British Columbia late this fall, anyone?

7 Ways to Stay Safe When You’re Traveling Alone
Everyone travels alone at some point. Blending in, booking hotels strategically and trusting your gut are among the tips that a batch of frequent solo travelers offer in this Mental Floss article. (For more info, see 15 Mistakes to Avoid When Traveling Solo.)

6 Ways to Stay Healthy When You Travel
If anyone knows what to do to stay healthy on the road, it’s someone who hasn’t been home in nine months. In this Medium article John Fawkes intermittently fasts, takes probiotics and melatonin, and incorporates other habits into his day to stay healthy. (Check out 9 Products to Help You Stay Healthy While Traveling.)

5 Underrated European Destinations
Romania and Montenegro are among a handful of spots in Europe that more travelers should make a priority to see, says a woman who quit her New York City job to travel the world. This autumn’s shoulder season could be the ideal time to check some out.

4 Affordable Ways to Travel Long Term
Huffington Post travel blogger Shannon Ullman suggests that volunteering abroad not only is personally rewarding, but also allows you to stay in a place for a longer period of time without spending a lot of money. She offers three other ways you can afford to travel longer.

3 Off-Season Luxe Destinations for Less
Two spots in the Caribbean and one landlocked U.S. destination made the TODAY Show’s list of three well-discounted destinations for this fall.

2 People Traveling for a Year on $20,000
Writer Chris Guillebeau profiles an Arizona couple who ditched their stay-in-one-place lifestyle and hit the road, allowing housesitting opportunities to determine their destinations. Hard to believe they financed nearly the whole year merely by selling their car!

dog bark park inn cottonwood idaho

1 B&B Shaped Like a Beagle
Just when you think you’ve seen it all, you suddenly discover a bed and breakfast built in the shape of a floppy-eared dog. The blog My Modern Met features the Dog Bark Park Inn in Cottonwood, Idaho, a two-bedroom cottage shaped like a beagle. Go fetch?

Where are you headed this fall?

5 Photos to Inspire an Autumn Trip
12 Places That Shine in Shoulder Season

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma