Home

Explore. Experience. Engage.

Home Travel Tips Travel Deals Destinations Trip Reviews Blog
The IndependentTraveler.com Blog

Catch up with the stories you may have missed over the past seven days.

dubai at night


Top 20 Post-Election Travel Destinations
USA Today reports that TripAdvisor experienced a surge of booking activity from midnight on Election Day to 1 p.m. the day after. The site released the 10 most-booked countries and 10 most-booked cities during that time period. You might find some of them surprising. (The most-booked city? Dubai.)

The Roof of America
Your travel eye candy for the week is this photo essay from Maptia, offering stunning shots of trekking in the mountains of Peru.

Italy’s New ‘Scattered Hotel’ Trend May Save Its Historic Towns
Conde Nast Traveler reports on a fascinating trend in Italy called the albergo diffuso, or “scattered hotel.” This involves turning abandoned historic villages into a resort of sorts, with guestrooms and apartments surrounding a central lobby.

Kris Tompkins: ‘Fighter by Trade,’ Wild at Heart
CNN profiles a woman who has spent more than two decades preserving the Patagonian wilderness in Chile and Argentina by purchasing land and turning it into national parks.

Europe’s Mosquito-Free Island Paradise: Iceland
There are few places on Earth where you won’t be bitten by mosquitoes, but Iceland is one of them, reports the New York Times. This may be thanks to its climate, but global warming could change that in the future.

The Modern Rebirth of the ‘Golden Rule’
BBC explores the state of Penang, Malaysia, where the locals are coping with their multicultural identity with an emphasis on mutual tolerance of different religions and cultures.

Antitrust Suit Against Airlines Can Move Ahead, Judge Says
A lawsuit accusing major U.S. airlines of colluding to set high airfares has been given the go-ahead by a federal judge, who rejected a motion to dismiss it, reports the Los Angeles Times.

This week’s video features a sweet in-flight proposal aboard a Qantas flight from Sydney, Australia to Santiago, Chile.


The 9 Best Places to Travel Alone
10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editor’s Note: IndependentTraveler.com is published by The Independent Traveler, Inc., a subsidiary of TripAdvisor, Inc.

Check out the travel stories you may have missed over the past seven days.

allegiant air plane


Breakdown at 30,000 Feet
The Tampa Bay Times has published a thorough — and alarming — investigative report on Allegiant Air, a budget airline whose planes had to make emergency landings 77 times last year due to mechanical failures. The Times notes that Allegiant’s planes are four times as likely to experience in-flight failures as aircraft operated by other U.S. airlines.

The Romantic Myth of ‘Living Like a Local’
The San Francisco Chronicle questions the popular desire to “live like a local” when we travel. “What you want is to live like a rich local,” writes travel editor Spud Hilton. “If you lived like the average local, you’d have to make your bed, have a crappy commute every morning to get to your average- to low-paying job, which you do to pay the bills for your tiny apartment, your meager car and your kids’ school supplies.”

In Buddha’s Footsteps: 15 Evocative Pictures of Faith in Myanmar
We loved this photo essay from Rough Guides, featuring photos of contemplative monks, golden stupas and Buddha statues in Myanmar.

Will Uluru Become Off-Limits to Tourists?
The NZ Herald reports that the indigenous people living near Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, are threatening to close the symbol of the Australian Outback if the government doesn’t act on some of their concerns. The Anangu people argue that their children are living in poverty while the government makes money off their land.

How to Hack Your Hotel’s Finicky Wi-Fi to Stream Shows
Bloomberg offers practical tips for travelers who’ve struggled to use Netflix or other streaming services while staying at hotels.

Eyes Aloft: The Sublime Obsession of Plane Spotting
The Virginia Quarterly Review offers a fascinating longread about plane spotters, also known as “avgeeks,” who document aircraft as they take off and land around the world. Their obsessive documentation has led to news scoops such as the return of basketball star LeBron James to his home town, which was predicted based on the sighting of the Cleveland Cavaliers’ owner’s private plane in Florida.

2016 Presidential Election: What It’s Like Traveling on the Campaign Trail
Those of us who travel a few times a year for vacation can hardly imagine what it’s like to be on the road constantly over the course of a relentless, months-long presidential campaign. Conde Nast Traveler interviews four NBC and MSNBC political reporters about what the experience has been like.

The Strange Story Behind the Boeing 747 Once Parked at Willow Run Airport
Did you know that there’s an airline that was founded in 1989 and is still in business but has not flown a single flight or earned any revenue? Michigan Radio shares the bizarre story of Baltia Airlines, which it calls “the world’s oldest start-up airline.”

This week’s video is a magical little Turkish Airlines safety video starring Zach King, known for short videos on Vine and YouTube that he calls “digital sleight of hand.”


9 Ways to Make Your Hotel Room More Comfortable
Living Like a Local: Interviews with Expats Around the World

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you may have missed this week from around the travel world.

brownstones in greenwich village new york


Airbnb Sues Over New Law Regulating New York Rentals
Airbnb continues to face challenges in New York after Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill imposing major fines to hosts who illegally rent out their homes or apartments, reports the New York Times. Proponents of the law are trying to protect affordable housing by preventing people from renting out places to short-term tourists. Airbnb has filed a lawsuit to challenge the new law.

I’ve Been Taking Business Trips for More Than a Decade — Here Are 8 of My Best Travel Tips
A longtime business traveler shares her smartest tips with Business Insider, including using airport restaurants for free Wi-Fi and snagging free bottled water from hotel gyms.

The Secret Behind Italy’s Rarest Pasta
BBC travels to the island of Sardinia to see how su filindeu — the world’s rarest pasta — is made. Only three women on the planet know the time-intensive process.

Poverty as a Tourism Attraction: Can Travel to a Developing Country Really Make a Difference?
Australian travel website Traveller delves into the experience of “poverty tourism,” in which wealthy tourists come to town for a few hours and “want to ‘fix’ disadvantage with a few giveaway pencils and a photo with the kids.” The author is uncomfortable with the concept but finds that this type of tourism isn’t entirely without merit.

Here Comes a Wave of Change for Cuba
A National Geographic writer hops aboard the first U.S. cruise ship to visit Cuba in nearly 40 years and asks the locals how they feel about the incoming wave of American tourists.

Air Horse One: This Airline Is Strictly for the Animals
Every wondered how racehorses travel to the Kentucky Derby and other major events? USA Today takes us inside Air Horse One, a plane designed specifically to carry animals. Fun fact: The plane ascends and descends more gently than regular commercial flights to avoid startling or jostling the horses.

Airbus Offers a Peek at Its Flying Taxi
Anyone who’s ever sat in a traffic jam has wished they could simply fly their car over the mess — and CNN reports that Airbus is working on technology that could someday let us do just that. The “pilotless passenger aircraft” would take off and land vertically, with no need for a runway.

This week’s video offers a look at one of France’s most incredible tourist sites: Mont St-Michel.

A Medieval Abbey Trapped by Tides and Time from Great Big Story on Vimeo.


Voluntourism: Does It Really Help?
Photos: A Walking Tour of Old Havana

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the travel stories you might have missed over the past week.

airplane on tarmac


The Countries with the Best (and Worst) Airfare Deals in the World
Thrillist reports on a new aviation price index that can help you keep perspective on whether it truly is expensive to fly. The U.S. is the third-cheapest country for domestic flights (behind India and Malaysia), but it ranks 54th (out of 75 countries) for international flights. Canada ranks dead last for international flights, while China offers the best value.

Surfing Under the Northern Lights
Even if you’re not particularly interested in surfing, you won’t want to miss this feature from the New York Times, which combines striking imagery with a fascinating story about “hanging 10” in an unexpected part of the world.

A New Perspective of Our Planet
We loved clicking through the incredible satellite photos in this slideshow from CNN. Our favorite shots include Ipanema Beach and tulip fields in the Netherlands.

See the People Who Live in a Legendary Underground Town
National Geographic visits the remote town of Coober Pedy, located in the Australian Outback, where the heat can go as high as 113 degrees in the shade. That’s why most of the locals live in dugout caves.

Why Airline Codesharing Must Die
Ever booked a flight on one airline and then realized at the airport that your flight was actually operated by a different carrier? USA Today explains the dangers of codesharing, including going to the wrong terminal or even missing your flight.

15 Photos That Prove Alberta is Heaven on Earth
Join us in swooning over these photos of Alberta, Canada, from OrdinaryTraveler.com — including turquoise lakes, hidden streams and looming mountains.

Airplane Passengers Fall in Love with Emotional Support Duck Accompanying Owner with PTSD
Need a smile? Check out these ABC News photos of Daniel Turducken Stinkerbutt, an emotional support duck who recently accompanied his owner, Carla Fitzgerald, on a couple of flights. Fitzgerald suffers from PTSD.

This week’s video offers a glimpse into two countries rarely explored by travelers: Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.


10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight
How to Hack Your Way to a Cheaper Airfare

— written by Sarah Schlichter

If you wear eyeglasses, you’ll need to take them off before having a photo snapped for your passport.

woman with passport at airport


Starting in two weeks, on November 1, the U.S. State Department is banning glasses from passport photos. Apparently, rogue shadows and glares are skewing our good looks.

Glasses are the most common reason that passport application photos get rejected, according to the State Department. In fact, passport processors had to turn back more than 200,000 passport applications last year because of poor photos. Eliminating eyeglasses will add more consistency to U.S. passports and hopefully prevent a good chunk of application rejections.

Given that the passport division expects to process 20 million U.S. passports next year — a record high — anything it can do to speed up the process is good for all of us.

If you absolutely must wear your glasses to have your photo taken, you may do so, but must include a note from your doctor stating that the glasses are a “medical necessity.” Our advice? If you can do without your eyeglasses for the five seconds that you’re having your pic snapped, forgo them; you can still wear them while traveling.

If you are sporting the four-eyed look in your current passport, don’t fret. Your travel documents are still valid. Just remember to go sans glasses when you get the passport renewed.

And unlike in France, where an administrative appeals court has upheld a ban on smiling for passport photos or identity papers, you are still allowed to look happy in your U.S. passport photo. For now.

10 Things You Don’t Know About Passports
The Passport Center: How to Get or Renew a U.S. Passport

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Check out the most newsworthy stories from the travel world this week.

perito moreno glacier argentina


Why the United Kingdom Is the Best Vacation Deal Right Now — and Brazil Is the Worst
Vox has crunched exchange rate and inflation numbers to come up with a list of where you should travel to get the best bang for your buck. Unsurprisingly, in the wake of Brexit the U.K. is the best deal for Americans; it’s followed by Argentina and Mexico. Not such a great deal? Brazil, Japan and Iceland.

This Is Why Long-Haul Coach Class Has Hardly Changed in Five Decades
While airlines seem to be introducing constant improvements to first and business class, Skift looks into the reasons why those of us in the back of the plane haven’t seen any substantive changes in years.

The Moroccan Town Drenched in Blue
BBC offers a gorgeous photo essay on the town of Chefchaouen, Morocco, which is painted almost entirely in shades of blue.

Welcome to Purridise: Taiwan’s Houtong Cat Village
Calling all animal lovers! Lonely Planet spotlights a small Taiwanese village populated by hundreds of stray cats.

How Travel Nerds Book Airfare
Houstonia offers an in-depth look at how one traveler got creative to find an affordable airfare to Europe — including trying different cities, checking trains and rental cars, and piecing together itineraries with discount airlines.

Icelandair’s Celebration Stopover Buddy Service Will Help Plan the Perfect Layover
Icelandair has recently made some improvements to its longstanding stopover program, which allows travelers to add some extra time in Reykjavik to any Europe flight for free. Now Conde Nast Traveler reports that the airline is offering a “celebration stopover buddy” who will help you make your Iceland travel fantasy happen.

16 Evocative Pictures of Sri Lanka
Get inspired by these photos from Rough Guides from a recent trip to Sri Lanka. Be sure to scroll all the way to the bottom — we promise the last one will make you smile.

This week’s video is a short feature film from Holland.com. Yes, it’s basically a 17-minute destination commercial, but the sweet storyline and the dreamy footage of Amsterdam make it an entertaining watch.


9 Best Netherlands Experiences
10 Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you may have missed in the travel world this week.

scale


Airline’s Move to Weigh Passengers Before They Board Draws Complaints from American Samoans
The Telegraph reports on a “weighty” issue: two American Samoan business travelers have filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Transportation against Hawaiian Airlines, which weighed them on a recent flight from Honolulu and assigned specific seats to keep the plane’s load evenly distributed. The airline was carrying out a six-month survey to figure out why planes were burning more fuel than expected on flights to American Samoa, which has the world’s highest rate of obesity.

Incredible Macro Photography Shows Cities Captured in Tiny Water Drops
This is a fun find from Lonely Planet: close-up shots from a Serbian photographer who’s managed to capture reflections of the Empire State Building, Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia and other world landmarks in droplets of water.

Clinton vs. Trump: Where Presidential Candidates Spend Their Travel Dollars
Skift puts a travel spin on America’s seemingly endless presidential election, revealing which booking engines, airlines and rental car companies are getting the most money from each campaign. Fun fact: Clinton’s team books with Expedia, while the Trump campaign prefers Hotels.com.

I’m Married, But I Still Travel Solo
A dedicated solo traveler shares a personal essay in the Washington Post about how important her adventures are to who she is — and how she wasn’t willing to compromise that even in an attempt to find a long-term partner.

Budget Airline Bans Kids from “Quiet Zone”
Yet another Asian airline has banned children from certain parts of its planes, reports News.com.au. Following in the footsteps of Malaysian Airlines, Thai Airways and others, India’s IndiGo (a low-cost carrier) has adopted a “quiet zone” where kids under 12 aren’t permitted.

Yukon’s Kluane National Park and Reserve: Reaching the Top of Canada
A writer for National Geographic overcomes his fear of bears to explore the remote Kluane National Park and Reserve, full of thousands of glaciers.

There Is Now a Google Map Filled with a World of Airport Wi-Fi Passwords
Here’s a nifty resource from Travel Pulse: a clickable map showing passwords and other info about the Wi-Fi offerings in airports around the world. Bookmark it and use it on your next trip.

Obituary: Norma Jean Bauerschmidt / Internet Sensation of “Driving Miss Norma”
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette eulogizes Norma Bauerschmidt, who died at the age of 91 after a year of traveling around the U.S. in a motorhome — which she decided to do rather than undergo cancer treatment. She had documented her journey on a Facebook page called “Driving Miss Norma.”

We love this video from Rough Guides about the seven things you learn on your first big trip. So true!


Airline Obesity Policies
16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed in the travel world this week.

angry man at airport


Unruly Airline Passengers Up Worldwide, But Down in U.S.
USA Today reports on a rising trend: airline passengers behaving badly. The International Air Transport Association saw nearly 11,000 reports of unruly air travelers in 2015, up from 9,316 incidents the year before. Such incidents involved verbal abuse, aggression against other passengers, failure to follow crew instructions and more; many also involved alcohol.

Craving a Life Reset? Meet the Woman Who Went Down Under to Start Over
This essay from AFAR details the physical and emotional journey of writer Maggie MacKellar, who moved from Sydney to a New South Wales farm and finally to remote Tasmania in the wake of two major losses. Maggie must learn to live in the sometimes harsh, insular world of a Tasmanian sheep farm.

In Pictures: Brushing Shoulders with Bears in Finland’s Newest National Park
We love these Rough Guides snapshots of Hossa, a wilderness area that will become Finland’s 40th national park next year. Bears, reindeer and pristine hiking trails are among the sights visitors will see.

It’s Cheaper to Travel with My Daughter for a Year Than to Live at Home
An Australian mom shares her experience of traveling around Asia with her 6-year-old daughter for 12 months. She tells the Huffington Post that it’s actually less expensive to live on the road than it is to stay home in Sydney, which has a much higher cost of living.

Fly-Along Companions Offer a Way for Older People to Travel
Most of us never want to be too old to travel, and a new trend offers some hope. The New York Times reports that a growing number of agencies are popping up to provide paid companions that can help older travelers navigate airports and manage travel logistics.

The World’s Oldest Library Gets a 21st-Century Facelift
CNN takes us inside the al-Qarawiyyin Library in Fez, Morocco, which opened in the year 859 and is believed to be the oldest library on the planet. In the face of extensive water damage, the library is currently being refurbished and is expected to open to the public next year.

Starwood-Marriott Merger: Your Loyalty Program Questions, Answered
If you belong to a Starwood or Marriott loyalty program and aren’t sure how the merger of the two companies will affect you, don’t miss this Q&A from Conde Nast Traveler.

This week’s video takes a look at the daily life of the Nepalese people a year after an earthquake devastated the area.


— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed around the travel world this week.

airline pilot


17 Questions You’ve Always Wanted To Ask Your Airline Pilot
GQ sits down with British Airways airline pilot Mark Vanhoenacker to chat about how often he uses autopilot, which languages pilots speak with air traffic controllers and where the best place is to watch airplanes land.

Voyages: Visual Journeys by Six Photographers
Feast your eyes on these photos from the New York Times Magazine, taken in six different countries (Ethiopia, Albania, Australia, Finland, Peru and Spain). There’s a mini-essay from each photographer to provide context for the images.

10 Reasons to See More of Rwanda Than Just the Gorillas
Most tourists think of gorillas when they think of Rwanda (if they think of the country as a travel destination at all). Rough Guides encourages a broader view, touting Rwanda’s other attractions, such as performances of traditional dance, stunning hiking trails, a vibrant capital and the chance to bike with the country’s national team.

Americans Have Now Paid Enough in Checked Bag Fees to Buy Any U.S. Airline
Thrillist ran the numbers and discovered that U.S. carriers have collected more than $26.2 billion in checked bag fees — enough to buy just about any American airline outright.

Purple Drinks and Chicken Spas: A Spicy Thai Homestay
We loved reading this vivid National Geographic account of a three-night homestay in a small Thai village. The reporter immerses himself in local life by learning to prepare Thai food, enjoying a unique “spa” treatment and watching the Thai version of “The Price Is Right.”

On Smithsonian Museum Day, Visit More Than 1,200 Museums for Free
Conde Nast Traveler gives us a timely heads up: This Saturday, more than 1,200 museums across the U.S. will be opening their doors for free as part of a Smithsonian initiative. (The Smithsonian museums in Washington D.C. are, of course, free at all times.)

Reporter Returns to Haiti and Finds Cherished Hotel Shuttered
An NPR correspondent mourns the closing of the Villa Creole near Port-au-Prince in Haiti, where he stayed on multiple occasions (including the 2010 earthquake).

This week’s video had us swooning over Western Canada’s wide-open vistas and lush hiking trails.


11 Best Canada Experiences
A Pilot Speaks Out: What You Don’t Know About Flying

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the best travel stories you might have missed this week.

plane in hudson river sully


What the “Sully” Movie Gets Wrong
If you’re planning to see “Sully” — the new Tom Hanks movie about the emergency airplane landing in the Hudson River back in 2009 — you may want to take it with a grain of salt. Conde Nast Traveler reports that the film had to massage the truth a bit, adding in “villains” in the form of National Transportation Safety Board investigators.

Why “Sully” Made Me Proud to Be a Flight Attendant
While the movie may not have presented the NTSB in the best light, flight attendant Heather Poole found the portrayal of her profession to be both accurate and inspiring: “I can tell [my son] a million times that [my job is] not just about serving drinks and snacks, but until you see something like what happens in the movie ‘Sully,’ it’s kind of hard to grasp. To see his face light up like that made me feel good.”

25 Years After Independence, a Country at a Crossroads
This story offers a window into a rarely seen country: Tajikistan. As with most National Geographic features, the photos — stark mountain landscapes and probing portraits of the local people — are at least as striking as the words.

As More Devices Board Planes, Travelers Are Playing with Fire
As if we needed something else to worry about, the New York Times reports that the lithium-ion batteries found in smartphones, tablets and laptops are a major fire hazard on planes. Battery fires have contributed to three cargo plane crashes within the past decade.

Meet Earl, the Gatekeeper to Paradise
BBC interviews a man named Earl, the sole resident of a place called Paradise, located on a rough dirt road that runs between Montana and Idaho. Earl is the “camp host” for Bitterroot National Forest, welcoming hikers, rafters and other outdoorsy types throughout the summer months.

The Best Wildlife Photos from @USInterior on Instagram
All together now: “Awwww.” We love this slideshow of cuddly critters — starting with a baby bobcat! — sourced by USA Today from the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Instagram account.

Airlines Mining Consumer Data to Target Potential Passengers
CNN reports that your airline may know more about you than you think — including your birthday, the places you visit most and what you buy besides airfare. It’s part of an effort to “improve passenger experience” (and/or market to you more effectively).

We cracked up over this week’s video, an “honest airline commercial” that sums up so many frustrating aspects of modern-day flying.


Patrick Stewart Hilariously Acts Out 5 Most Annoying Fliers
New Study Reveals Travelers’ Biggest Pet Peeves

— written by Sarah Schlichter