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It’s hard to believe there are at least 55,000 museums in the world, according to the International Council of Museums, with more than a dozen more opening in 2017. Here are the six we’re most excited about.

louvre abu dhabi


(Note that all scheduled opening dates are subject to change.)

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town, South Africa: Perhaps the most anticipated opening in the world is this first-ever museum in Africa dedicated to contemporary art. It’s being touted as Africa’s most significant museum in more than a century. It opens September 23.

Museum of the Bible, Washington D.C., United States: A space dedicated to the history and narrative of the Bible will open near the National Mall this fall. Noteworthy displays at the museum include one of the world’s largest private collections of rare biblical texts, a walk-through replica of first-century Nazareth and fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Louvre Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Ten years ago, officials from France and Abu Dhabi signed an agreement to open an offshoot of the famed Parisian art museum. After many delays, it appears the museum will open this year, though officials aren’t confirming exactly when. In a stunning building by the sea, the museum will feature permanent collections and masterpieces on loan from the Louvre in Paris.

Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara, Jakarta, Indonesia: Another museum first: Indonesia’s first-ever museum of modern art. Opening in November, the private museum known as the MACAN will include 800 pieces from the 19th century through today.

Yves Saint Laurent Museums, Paris, France, and Marrakech, Morocco: Two museums dedicated to the legendary fashion designer will open in two cities of importance to him. Saint Laurent’s Parisian 30-year office and atelier will house one, and the other will be in the designer’s adopted city, not far from where his ashes were scattered after he died. Vogue reports that the museums will open in September.

Museum Barberini, Potsdam, Germany: Europe’s newest museum is a fine collection of Old Masters, Impressionism and modern art housed in a restored palace dating back to 1771. The museum is based around the private collection of businessman Hasso Plattner, its founder and patron. The museum opens January 23.

12 Great Museums You’ve Never Heard Of
The Best 9 Cities to See Cool Public Art

— written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Check out what you may have missed from around the travelsphere.

traveler in myanmar


9 Things Everyone Who Has Traveled Abroad Has Thought at Least Once
Travel + Leisure has compiled a list of lessons international travelers have learned through their journeys — including “Mistakes are not the end of the world” and “Language doesn’t have to be a barrier.”

At the Grand Canyon, a Cancer Survivor Rises to the Challenge of a Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim Hike
We loved this inspiring Washington Post essay about a woman’s journey from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to the North Rim and back after a bout with cancer.

Security Shortcut ‘Clear’ Coming to Four of the Busiest U.S. Airports
Conde Nast Traveler reports that there will soon be another way to speed through four busy American airports: Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York LaGuardia and New York JFK. Clear (unlike the government-run TSA PreCheck) is a private program that lets you pay an annual fee to skip the line for document check at security.

9 Reasons You Need to Visit Mongolia in 2017
Vogue highlights the charms of a destination most travelers have never considered: Mongolia. After reading about its wide-open spaces and unique spiritual culture, we’re moving it up our must-visit list.

Europe’s First Underwater Museum Opens Off Lanzarote
The Guardian offers otherworldly photos from the newly opened Museo Atlantico in the Canary Islands. The underwater sculptures offer a profound political statement.

The City with a Chip on Its Shoulder
What unites so-called “second cities,” wonders BBC? It’s not just the fact of being a country’s second-most-populous city, but also traits such as fewer expectations and a bit of a chip on their shoulder.

Ancient History Along the Nile
This essay from the New York Times captures what it’s like to cruise Egypt’s Nile River, with all its enchantments and quirks.

This week’s video is a unique job opportunity. A family of five is seeking a nanny to travel with them and homeschool their young children — with all travel expenses paid.


9 Best Places to Travel in 2017
The Healing Power of Travel

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed in the travel world this week.

airplane wing sunrise


MasterCard Could Share Your Height and Weight with Airlines, But Will It?
Skift reports on an eyebrow-raising new patent application from MasterCard that could affect how your data is shared with airlines. Because the credit card company has records of consumer purchases — including the sizes of shoes and clothing — it could theoretically let an airline know how large you are, allowing the carrier to avoid seating “two physically large strangers next to each other,” according to the patent.

Travel Is So Much Better Than It Was
It’s easy for travelers to find things to complain about — baggage fees, security lines, shrinking legroom — but this column from the National Review points out that we actually have it pretty good these days, thanks to new technology and innovative services such as Airbnb and Uber.

The Most Colorful Job in the World?
BBC offers a gorgeous photo essay about the workers who make mosaic tiles for the Great Mosque in Herat, Afghanistan.

Coming Innovations That Will Make Flying Economy (Mostly) Better
Wired reports on new trends in the air travel industry, from mood lighting and heated seats to more efficient security checkpoints and in-flight virtual reality.

Five Myths About Hotel Room Service
USA Today debunks a few common myths about room service. Did you know, for instance, that you might not have to tip (if the gratuity is already included on the bill)?

The 2017 Travel Forecast: Reduced Demand Could Result in Vacation Bargains
The Washington Post reports that many Americans aren’t planning to travel this coming year — which could lead to good deals for those who do want to hit the road.

How to Travel the World with No Money — by People Who Have Done It
The Guardian interviews three people who recently took ultra-budget trips that relied not on money but on the kindness of strangers. (Would you hitchhike for 72 days across South and Central America?) They share the good, bad and ugly from their trips.

This week’s video explains the math behind a frustrating problem for travelers: overbooked flights.


What to Do if Your Flight Is Overbooked
10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you may have missed from around the travel world this week.

drone photo of bogata forest romania


20 Best Photos of 2016
The Dronestagram blog offers picks for the best drone photos of the past 12 months, featuring striking shots of roads, beaches and lavender fields from a unique bird’s-eye perspective.

Resolve to Be a Better Traveler (It’s Easier Than Losing Weight)
This piece from the San Francisco Chronicle offers up some advice — in the form of New Year’s resolutions — for travelers in 2017. Our favorite: “Put the camera/smartphone down. Sit, breathe and watch a foreign world go by.”

U.S. Government Collecting Social Media Information from Foreign Travelers
The Guardian reports that the U.S. government wants foreign visitors to reveal their Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts when applying for a visa. It’s part of an effort to fight terrorism, though we can’t help but wonder whether a would-be terrorist would happily volunteer his or her incriminating accounts. (The social media info is not required in order to obtain a visa.)

Georgia’s Svan Song
Roads & Kingdoms profiles the little-known region of Svaneti, in the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia. The unique culture and religion of this region is endangered by economic decline and a lack of visitors.

Inside the Life of an Oyster Hotel Investigator
Ever wondered what it’s like to review and photograph hotels for a living? Our sister site, Oyster.com, offers an interview with one of its hotel investigators, who shares what an average day is like and reveals why it’s not as glamorous a job as it might sound.

The 10 Best Low-Cost Airlines in the World
Business Insider reveals the best low-cost carriers around the world, according to a recent Skytrax survey. The winner for the eighth year in a row? AirAsia. The only American carrier on the list, Virgin America, came in second.

Evicted Tenants Fight Back Against Airbnb With Detectives and Lawyers
Airbnb’s ongoing legal battle continues, Skift reports, with evicted tenants hiring detectives to prove that their former homes are now being used as short-term rentals. Opponents of Airbnb argue that the service is reducing cities’ supplies of affordable housing.

Asia’s Most Interesting Bazaar
The Time Travel Turtle blog’s colorful photos of this market in Kashgar, China, are a feast for the eyes.

This week’s video was shot in Rwanda and Uganda, and captures the region’s people, animals and landscapes. (Our favorite part? The gorillas.)


What’s Your New Year’s Travel Resolution?
Planning an African Safari

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out the stories you may have missed from around the travelsphere.

travel photographer


Travel Photographer of the Year: 2016 Winners Revealed
Feast your eyes on CNN’s gallery of the best travel photos of the year, which capture the world’s people and places in striking fashion.

Five Myths About Travel Photography
Want to create award-winning travel shots of your own someday? Start with these tips from USA Today.

On the Streets of San Telmo
This piece from the Globe and Mail is a funny and thoughtful personal essay about a tango lesson in Buenos Aires.

Inside the World’s First Year-Round Ice Hotel
Forbes offers gorgeous pictures from ICEHOTEL 365, located north of the Arctic Circle in Jukkasjarvi, Sweden. It’s the world’s first permanent snow and ice hotel. (Most are only open in the colder months.)

What a Trip: Retiring Travel Writer Ellen Creager Tells All
Think travel pros never have snafus on the road? Think again. A veteran travel writer for the Detroit Free Press shares some of her funniest anecdotes of trips gone awry over the years.

This Instagrammer’s Fairytale Images of Moscow in the Snow Are Dazzlingly Gorgeous
We swooned over this collection of wintry Moscow photos from Lonely Planet. Put Russia on our must-visit list!

15 Tweets That Describe the Hilarious Hell of Holiday Travel
Have a laugh at this amusing roundup of holiday travel tweets from the Huffington Post. Our favorite: “If you put your bag in overhead bin near row 7 & you sit in row 20, I am putting you on Santa’s naughty list!! #Grinchmas #Holiday Travel” We couldn’t agree more.

This week’s video is the annual “Christmas Miracle” offering from Canadian airline WestJet, featuring a heartwarming gift to the community of Fort McMurray after it was devastated by wildfires earlier this year.


12 Things You Don’t Photograph — But Should
Don’t Make These Travel Photography Mistakes

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what’s worth reading in the travel world from the past week.

woman with phone on plane


The U.S. Government May Allow In-Flight Phone Calls, and People Are Freaking Out
Business Insider reports on a recent proposal from the U.S. Department of Transportation that would require airlines and booking agents to state in advance whether passengers are allowed to make voice calls on flights. Passengers are currently not allowed to make voice calls via their cell phones on certain radio frequencies, but there are no rules against chatting via Wi-Fi using services such as Skype.

50 Reasons to #LovetheWorld
Clicking through this gallery from BBC will spark your wanderlust all over again. The site has reached out to dozens of contributers and travelers for anecdotes from incredible journeys around the world.

Conquering Choquequirao: The Long Walk to Peru’s Lesser-Known ‘Lost City’
Lonely Planet takes us on a hike to the long-hidden Incan citadel of Choquequirao, which currently only gets about a dozen visitors a day but may become more accessible in the near future.

Next Year Is Shaping Up to Be Another Good One for Airlines — and Travelers
How about some good news for your holiday season via NBC News? Among the findings in this report: Fares are falling, traveler satisfaction with airlines in North America has reached a 10-year high and a couple of airlines have brought back free in-flight snacks.

Cuba’s Young Artists Embrace a New World
This National Geographic feature offers fascinating photos and stories from the young people of Cuba, where “individualism is creeping out into the open” after the recent death of Fidel Castro.

‘Basic Economy’ Fares Make Sense: Opposing View
When United recently announced that its new Basic Economy fares would not include overhead bin access, many travelers and news outlets responded with outrage. But this piece on USA Today makes the case for these bargain-basement fares, arguing that while they won’t suit everyone, they fill a niche for price-sensitive travelers who don’t need many amenities.

Rome’s Sad Christmas Tree Gets a Makeover After Residents Complain
When in Rome … you’d better not have a skimpy Christmas tree. Conde Nast Traveler reports on a recent controversy over the tree in the Italian capital, which was dubbed the “Austerity Tree” by disgruntled locals. Its decorations have since been, er, spruced up.

This week’s video offers an intimate look at everyday life in Bali.


How to Get the Best Airplane Seat
11 Things Not to Do on a Plane

— written by Sarah Schlichter

For the second year in a row, one hotel chain’s rewards program has been chosen as the provider of the best overall benefits to travelers.

hotel reception


Wyndham Rewards is the top overall hotel rewards program, according to a study by WalletHub, a website that provides credit advice to consumers. Wyndham’s program appeals just as much to those who travel infrequently as it does to those who travel a lot, and it ranked highly for its ease of achieving top membership status, number of hotels where rewards can be used and minimal blackout dates, among other attributes.

WalletHub pitted 12 hotel rewards programs against one other, examining 21 key metrics, including point values, blackout dates, brand exclusions and expiration policies. The top 10 brands, in order:

1. Wyndham Rewards
2. Best Western Rewards
3. Marriott Rewards
4. Club Carlson
5. La Quinta Returns
6. Hyatt Gold Passport
7. Drury Gold Key Club
8. Hilton HHonors
9. Choice Privileges
10. The Ritz-Carlton Rewards

La Quinta Returns was deemed to offer the best rewards value, offering up to $14.17 in rewards value for every $100 the hotel guest spends. Meanwhile, Best Western is the only brand among the 12 whose points do not expire if your account stays inactive for a while. The majority of hotel rewards points expire after 18 to 24 months of inactivity.

The study also found that the majority of the 12 brands have maintained or exceeded their programs’ value this year vs. last year.

“I think the typical consumer generally overvalues the benefits of hotel rewards program membership and underestimates the commitment required to obtain those benefits,” Professor Sung H. Ham of George Washington University wrote as part of the study.

Receiving free nights in a hotel is admittedly attractive, Ham said, but it requires a big commitment from the consumer. “Even if consumers are motivated to achieve the free night, consumers may still overvalue the rewards that can be obtained from being loyal,” Ham said. “Loyal consumers are less likely to engage in price comparisons and may ultimately end up paying more for each stay to earn the free night award.”

That being said, being a part of a hotel loyalty program can often provide non-monetary benefits, such as more personalized service, says Professor Lei Huang of the State University of New York at Fredonia.

Are you a member of a hotel rewards program?

7 Smart Reasons to Join a Hotel Rewards Program
Smart Tactics to Get More from Your Hotel Points
The Trouble with Hotel Reward Programs

–written by Elissa Leibowitz Poma

Check out what you might have missed around the travel world this week.

airplane passenger


British Airways Has Patented a ‘Digital Pill’ to Make Flying Easier — But Is It Really Necessary?
The Independent reports on a bizarre new patent filed by British Airways, involving passengers swallowing a small digital chip that will transmit information such as their body temperature and stomach acidity level in order to help the cabin crew better tend to their physical needs. Useful … or creepy?

The 10 Most Beautiful Places in Italy — as Voted by You
Rough Guides is here with your weekly dose of travel porn: droolworthy photos from around the Boot, from Florence to Cinque Terre. Swoon!

Meet Bette Nash: She Might Just Be the World’s Oldest Serving Flight Attendant
We enjoyed this fun profile from CNN of an 80-year-old flight attendant who’s been serving in the skies for nearly 60 years.

Chongqing’s Number One Noodle Obsessive
Caution: You may get hungry reading this essay from Roads & Kingdoms about “Brother Lamp,” a noodle expert in Chongqing, China. The author of the story joins Brother Lamp to try dozens of bowls of xiaomian, breakfast noodles made with various vegetables and meats.

Learn How This Couple Is Traveling the World on $24 a Day
Need a little travel inspiration? Check out this story from the Washington Post about a couple who have trimmed their travel budget down to a mere $12.20 per person, per day, thanks to tactics such as traveling by bus and searching for local guesthouses that don’t advertise online.

Online Booking Is, Like, So ’90s: The Humble Travel Agent Is Making a Comeback
NBC News reports on the resurgence of travelers using agents to book all or part of their trips. “It’s time versus money. A lot of people just don’t have the time or the expertise to plan a trip and do it well,” says one travel agent quoted in the story.

50 Reasons to Love the World
Get inspired as you click through this gorgeous gallery from BBC, in which various travelers share their photos and travel memories.

This week’s video takes us to Havana and beyond in a voyage around Cuba.


Can Americans Travel to Cuba? Yes — and Here’s How
10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Read up on the news and stories you may have missed this week from around the travel world.

travelers on segways


The Inventions That Ruined Travel
Have a laugh over this tongue-in-cheek list of travel abominations from the Telegraph, featuring things like Segways, wax museums and “ride-on” suitcases. Our favorite is the section on selfie sticks, or “this narcissistic weapon of Satan.”

Otherworldly Silence
Warning: After clicking through this stunning Maptia photo essay about Antarctica, you may find yourself researching trips to the world’s most remote continent.

From Grand Hotel to Microhotel: How Your Stay Has Changed in 200 Years
Conde Nast Traveler surveys two centuries of hotel trends, starting with the grand properties that sprang up in 19th-century Europe and extending through the chain hotels of the early 20th century and the hip boutiques of the 1980s and 1990s. The author even offers a vision of what hotels might look like in the future.

29 Travel Hacks That Even Frequent Fliers Don’t Know
Insider rounds up some clever tips that go beyond the usual travel advice, including grabbing a cab in your airport’s departure zone instead of at arrivals and keeping a small waterproof bag packed at all times with necessary chargers and cables.

Fake Service Animals and Why Airline Passengers Are Upset
South Florida’s Sun Sentinel reports on a growing trend: the rise in service and emotional support animals on planes. Some travelers are abusing the laws requiring airlines to accept service animals by pretending that their pets are traveling with them for emotional support when they’re really just trying to evade the rules and fees for bringing a pet onboard.

5 Ways Travel for Frequent Fliers Got Worse in 2016
Skift offers a glum look at the air travel landscape, which in 2016 featured rising admission fees to airline lounges and the advent of “basic economy” fares.

12 Poignant Images of Tribal Peoples Around the World
Rough Guides showcases the photos that will appear in the 2017 calendar of Survival International, an advocacy group for the rights of indigenous peoples around the world. These images capture these people’s human dignity and endangered lifestyle.

This week’s video is a mesmerizing peek into the Kyushu region of Japan.


12 Best Japan Experiences
18 Best Airport Hacks

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Check out what you might have missed from around the travelsphere.

ryanair plane


Many Ryanair Flights Could Be Free in a Decade, Says Its Chief
Most airline news these days is about reduced services and extra fees, but here’s something a little different: The CEO of Ryanair, a European discounter, recently said that he wants his carrier to offer free flights within the next five to 10 years, reports the Guardian. Instead of charging for airfare, the airline would make money via a revenue share with the airports from which the carrier’s passengers fly.

Airbnb Broadens Its Business with Tours and Travel Experiences
Airbnb made a splash this past week when it announced that it was expanding its offerings to include tours and activities, reports the New York Times. Examples include a two-day Behind the Art experience in Miami, in which you can meet local artists, and stargazing excursions in Los Angeles.

Visions of Kenya
We love this black and white photo essay from Maptia, in which the photographer offers both wild landscape images and intimate portraits from his monthlong solo trip to Kenya.

Every Country’s Tourism Slogan, In One Map
This Digg map of the world’s tourism slogans makes for fun browsing. Some countries’ slogans are enticing (“Brunei: a kingdom of unexpected treasures”), others are odd (“El Salvador: the 45-minute country”) and still others simply make us laugh (“Visit Armenia, it is beautiful”).

In Praise of Bus Travel, the Least Glamorous But Most Lovable Way to Travel
This first-person essay from the Los Angeles Times is a paean to both the pleasures and quirks of traveling by bus, from the ratty seats and the diversity of the passengers to the “sweet way the self disappears during bus travel.”

Why It’s Time to Rethink Frequent Flier Programs
Airfarewatchdog founder (and frequent traveler) George Hobica argues in the Huffington Post that airline loyalty programs are becoming less useful to many travelers — and should therefore inspire less loyalty.

Inside the Airport of the Future
Conde Nast Traveler rounds up more than a half-dozen technological innovations happening at airports around the world, including scanners that don’t require liquids to be removed from your carry-on and personalized navigation systems that send you directions based on where you’re standing in the terminal.

This week’s video, which features a narrator reciting Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road,” captures the spirit of why we travel.


16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel
Survey Says: Travel Makes Us Happier

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Editor’s Note: IndependentTraveler.com is published by The Independent Traveler, Inc., a subsidiary of TripAdvisor, Inc., which also owns Airfarewatchdog.com.