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Welcome to IndependentTraveler.com’s 12 Days of Travel Giveaways! Every day between December 2 and December 13, we’ll feature a different travel product for our readers to win. You may enter to win as many items as you wish (but only once per item).

royce freedom walletToday’s product is a Royce Freedom Wallet, which includes a GPS tracker that can be linked to your smartphone or tablet using Bluetooth 4.0 technology — so you’ll always know where the wallet is. Say you leave it behind in your hotel room; once you get outside the range of your Bluetooth capability (typically up to 100 feet or so), you’ll get an alert on your phone letting you know the location of your wallet before you get too far away. This also means that if the wallet is stolen, you’ll find out almost immediately, enabling you to notify the authorities and be proactive in canceling your credit cards.

The leather wallet incorporates material that blocks radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, which could protect you from identity theft. (You can learn more about RFID technology in Could This Wallet Keep Your Passport Safe?)

The tracker device is compatible with mobile devices such as the iPhone 5, the iPad 3, the Samsung Galaxy S3 and others, and uses an app that’s available for iOS and Android. You can buy the wallet for $99 on Amazon.com.

One caveat: There are no clear instructions for how to install the batteries in the tracker, and doing it wrong can damage the sensitive technology or lead to the wallet’s location not tracking as expected. (We learned this one the hard way.) To install the batteries, pull out the tray most of the way, insert the batteries with the positive side up into the grooved openings and gently push the tray back in.

We’re giving away a black Royce Freedom Wallet for Men. Want to win it? Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on December 15, 2013. We’ll pick one person at random to win the wallet. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Wayne Johnson. Congratulations!

Stay tuned tomorrow for another giveaway!

12 Days of Travel Giveaways: Full List

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Welcome to IndependentTraveler.com’s 12 Days of Travel Giveaways! Every day between December 2 and December 13, we’ll feature a different travel product for our readers to win. You may enter to win as many items as you wish (but only once per item).

Today’s product is a Kuhi Comfort Travel Pillow, which we reviewed in Travel Pillow Challenge: The Quest for Good Airplane Sleep:

kuhi comfort travel pillow“The Kuhi Comfort Travel Pillow is not your standard-shaped neck pillow. It’s made of two soft cylindrical balls, attached by a strap. The selling point is that you can use it multiple ways. Turn it one way and the curved part is by your neck; flip it around and the flat part is against you. Straighten the strap and you can tuck one end over your shoulder and cuddle the other, put it behind you for back support and place it in your lap to rest a book.” The product retails for $39.99 on the Kuhi Comfort website.

We’re giving away a gently used Kuhi Comfort Travel Pillow. Want to win it? Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on December 15, 2013. We’ll pick one person at random to win the pillow. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Naomi Pradhan. Congratulations!

Stay tuned tomorrow for another giveaway!

12 Days of Travel Giveaways: Full List

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Welcome to IndependentTraveler.com’s 12 Days of Travel Giveaways! Every day between December 2 and December 13, we’ll feature a different travel product for our readers to win. You may enter to win as many items as you wish (but only once per item).

supersmarttagsToday’s product is a set of SuperSmartTags, which are luggage tags designed to help you to keep track of your bags while you travel. We reviewed the tags in Four High-Tech Luggage Tags and Apps That Will Save Your Trip:

“SuperSmartTags feature a code that anyone can use to report your bag online. Once the code for your bag is submitted, you’ll receive a text message, email or phone call explaining that your luggage has been found. Enter your itinerary on the SuperSmartTag site and airport staff will be able to view your travel plans and forward your luggage to your next destination. SuperSmartTag retails for $19.95 AUD [about $18.15 USD as of this posting] and comes with a three-year membership to the SuperSmartTag system.”

We’re giving away a set of two SuperSmartTag luggage tags. Want to win them? Leave a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on December 15, 2013. We’ll pick one person at random to win the tags. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Andrew Perry. Congratulations!

Stay tuned tomorrow for another giveaway!

12 Days of Travel Giveaways: Full List

– written by Sarah Schlichter

interviewWhen Vicki Lawrence of “Mama’s Family” travels, she likes to bring along a candle that smells like home. Blair Underwood, of “L.A. Law” fame, thinks the French Riviera city of Eze is the most romantic destination in the world. And “Dirty Jobs” host Mike Rowe recommends travelers avoid the bulkhead on an airplane and never check a bag.

These and other tidbits about the traveling habits of several actors, musicians and pop culture personalities can be found in the Chicago Tribune’s weekly “Go Away With…” column written by Jae-Ha Kim.

I first stumbled across Kim’s interview with Mike Rowe, the lovable host of the Discovery Channel’s “Dirty Jobs” and narrator of “Deadliest Catch,” who extolled the virtues of destinations like Hawaii in which he doesn’t have to worry about lice, tapeworms and diarrhea.

But Rowe also had advice for readers: When in Hawaii, let someone buy you a cold drink with a funny straw; when staying at a hotel, don’t forget to tip the housekeeping staff; and always pack less than you think you need.

Tourist No More: Three Secrets for Traveling like a Local

Since Rowe’s interview I’ve gone back and read earlier “Go Away With…” columns including one on journalist Lisa Ling who, like so many other mothers, is afraid other passengers will lash out at her if her baby makes noise on the plane. Her bucket list destinations include Morocco and Mongolia.

In Kim’s interview with Mayim Bialik, of TV’s “The Big Bang Theory,” I learned she tries to hit as many vegan restaurants as she can whenever she’s in New York City, uses lavender essential oil to calm herself down when she’s nervous about being on an airplane and always looks for a museum of Jewish history in every city she goes to.

Other personalities Jae-Ha Kim has interviewed for the column include Judah Friedlander, Billy Bush, Seth Rogan and many others.

Famous Traveling Companion: Who Would You Choose?

Which “Go Away With…” column is your favorite? Which actor, musician, artist or cultural personality would you want to see featured?

– written by Dori Saltzman

paris boxAdvertised as “the first gourmet tour around the world delivered to your door,” Try the World provides a gift box containing a quick taste of a different nation’s palate pleasers, every two months.

Founded by a Russian-born New York foodie and a French globetrotter, the company aims to offer not only premium artisanal and international food products, but also a more immersive experience including regional art and music. This is accomplished by a number of postcards included in your box that provide goodies such as poems, music playlists or lists of top local films.

We received a preview of the Paris Box (which will be sent out on November 28), and found postcards tucked inside that explained the origin of our packets of Les Confitures a l’Ancienne powdered dark chocolate (blended with Bourbon vanilla) for hot cocoa, the tiny Alain Milliat jams in Bergeron apricot or wild blueberry with a wildflower honey, and exotic Le Palais des Thes tea bags that meld French tea culture with those of Turkey and Tibet. These three companies alone represent the northwest (Maurencourt), central (Paris) and southeast (Orlienas) regions of France. Additional products you will find in your Paris Box are salted butter caramels by Le Petit Saunier, Chabert & Guillot nougat bars, Sel de Guerande fleur de sel from Brittany and chestnut cream by Clement Faugier.

Along with the international flavors you’ll sample in these high-end (but meagerly portioned) delicacies, you can accompany your cup of tea with the playlist provided (for Paris, it includes the likes of Satie, Gainsbourg and Gall) and read aloud “Exotic Perfume,” a poem by Charles Baudelaire (in English or in French) over chocolate.

12 Delicious Destinations for Foodies

Try the World is a subscription service, which charges $45 per box every two months. It’s a little pricey considering that the items included are close to sample size, but when you look at the variety and quality of the handpicked food items and the well-designed postcards, the box is a neat way to experience that country’s cultural scene from your living room couch. Compared to the price of sending flowers or a fruit basket, I would much rather receive something worldly yet personalized. Subscribing for a full year (six boxes) gives you something to look forward to, but my only complaint would be that the contents of the box don’t seem like they would sustain my global culinary whims over a two-month period.

The Tokyo box ships at the end of January, and the Rio de Janeiro box ships at the end of March. Future box themes have not been announced.

12 International Foods to Try Before You Die

– written by Brittany Chrusciel

stuffed animal suitcase travelToy travel — paying to send a stuffed animal or doll on a trip in lieu of going on one yourself — isn’t new. In fact, we’ve written about it before. We’ve never been fond of the idea of putting our hard-earned cash toward a trip for an inanimate object rather than ourselves. But then we stumbled across a company doing it for more heart-warming reasons than simply making (or wasting) money.

According to ABC News, Unagi Travel, a Japanese travel agency specializing in tours for stuffed toys, sends fake furry friends to places their owners can’t go due to illness or disability. After paying a fee and mailing their toys to Tokyo, where Unagi is based, clients can track their toys’ travels via the company’s Facebook page. At the conclusion of the trip, the animals are mailed back to their owners at no additional charge, along with souvenir photos. According to Unagi’s website, the entire process takes two to three weeks, depending on the adventure chosen.

Our Favorite Tokyo Hotels

Despite its admirable purpose, Unagi’s services are still a bit quirky, not to mention limited. There are currently four tours available to Kyoto, Tokyo, a traditional onsen (hot spring) and a “mystery” location. Rates range from $35 to $95, not including each stuffed animal’s outbound travel, which could be pricey for clients not living in Japan.

Some might still consider it a waste of money, but for those who can’t get out to explore new places, we wager it’s money well spent. In some of the more fortunate cases, owners of the plush participants have been able to retrace their stuffed animals’ steps when their health improved.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite stuffed animal? Would you send it on a trip without you if you were unable to go? Leave your comments below.

– written by Ashley Kosciolek

j bullivant solar backpackAlways excited to test out gadgets that might make my travels easier, I set off for Alaska last month with the Solar Backpack from J. Bullivant, a company that specializes in what it calls “Urban Survival Gear.” The pack is equipped with enough pockets and compartments to fit everything but the kitchen sink, as well as built-in solar panels for charging what’s known as a Personal Power Generator (PPG) — a tiny power pack for charging a cell phone or iPad when your devices are dead and there just aren’t enough outlets.

When it comes to the bag’s construction, I have no complaints. It’s comfortable, attractive, lightweight and durable. (Anything that survives my chronic overpacking has to be.) The storage options are plentiful, with spots specifically designed to hold everything from laptops and pens to car keys and spare change. There are even hidden compartments for more important items like passports and wallets.

The Ultimate Guide to Travel Packing

But this backpack’s claim to fame is its ability to charge electronics — and unfortunately, in that regard it was a bit of a bust. After two days of putting the pack in the sun for several hours, I saw no increase in the charge it gave to the PPG. It does work well if you use the included power/car adapter to plug the PPG directly into the wall to charge, but if you’re going to spend time and effort doing that, you might as well just plug in your cell phone or laptop or whatever it is you need the PPG for in the first place.

Of course, the semi-functionality of the product wouldn’t be such a big deal if it were priced in line with other backpacks. But for the most basic model, you can expect to shell out nearly $200. The amount you’ll pay increases from there, depending on what else — pepper spray, hazmat mask, water purification system, ballistic shield — you choose to add to your paranoia pack. (And no, we’re not kidding about anything in that list.)

All things considered, this is a great item to own if you’re active and need to keep your things organized on the go. The PPG is an added bonus if you have access to a car or wall outlet, but don’t get too hung up on the solar panel “cool” factor.

The Suitcase That Beats Bed Bugs

Want to try it for yourself? We’re giving away our (gently used) Solar Backpack. Just leave us a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on October 31, 2013. We’ll pick one person at random to win the backpack. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. Frannie Heath has won the backpack. Congratulations! Keep an eye on our blog for further chances to win.

– written by Ashley Kosciolek

time fliesThis post is part of our Time Flies series, highlighting unique ways to spend your down time at airports around the world.

Are you tired of the stale airport air? Does the wafting smell of Dunkin’ Donuts (or Tim Horton’s, for the northern crowd) eventually just wear you down?

If so, then Singapore‘s Changi Airport will be, quite literally, a breath of fresh air.

If you’re lucky enough to be flying from Terminal 1, check out the open-air Cactus Garden. With more than 40 different types of cacti and succulents, it sure beats an hour of trying to avoid eye contact with that fellow in pajamas directly across from you at the gate.

Should you be flying out of Terminal 2, have no fear. You could always wander over to explore the cacti, time permitting. Should time not permit, however, you’ve got a natural bevy of options at your disposal. In Terminal 2 you’ll first find what’s known as the “Enchanted Garden.”

I generally fly from Philadelphia, so anything pairing “airports” with “enchanting” — without the inclusion of soft pretzels — piques my interest.

This area in Changi’s Terminal 2 features blooming flowers coupled with LED lighting and sound effects. Should you find that dizzying, the undulating path is sure to help.

For those who aren’t aware, there is a natural rivalry between terminals (or if there’s not, there should be). Terminal 2 wasn’t about to let the cacti of Terminal 1 go mano a mano with just the aforementioned Enchanted Garden. Oh, no. Fliers deserve better.

Enter the Orchid Garden, Koi Pond and Sunflower Garden — all located in Terminal 2.

butterfly garden singapore changi airport 7 Picture-Perfect Airport Gardens

If those four areas of unique airport interest aren’t enough (or conveniently located to your gate), Terminal 3 can do you one better. It’s got a Butterfly Garden.

With over a thousand colorful creatures, this garden provides a unique opportunity to get up close and personal — and even watch a new butterfly coming out of its chrysalis in the Emergence Enclosure.

Have you been to Changi? Do you know of any other airports with unique ways to pass the time? Tell us about it in the comments below.

2 Airports Techies Will Want to Visit

– written by Matt Leonard

doorjammerAs a 5-foot-1 woman who travels alone on a semi-regular basis, I’m always on the lookout for ways to feel more secure on the road. That’s why I was intrigued when the DoorJammer crossed my desk.

The sturdy red gadget is a more sophisticated version of those little triangular wedges you can shove under a door to keep it from being forced open. It has an adjustable foot that allows it to be used on a variety of surfaces and even on uneven floors.

I gave it a try here in the IndependentTraveler.com office, once on carpet and once on a wood floor. While I wasn’t immediately sure how to work the DoorJammer just from looking at it, the step-by-step directions in the manual were easy to follow — put the flat part under the door and tighten the bolt until the engagement foot is firmly anchored against the floor. To take it off, unscrew the bolt. (In an emergency such as a fire, you can also simply pull straight up on the DoorJammer, and it will release immediately. I tested both removal strategies with no problems.)

When someone pushed on the door from outside, the DoorJammer held firm; although there was a clear gap between the frame and the upper part of the door (where my potential assailant was exerting force), the door did not open enough to let anyone in.

Hotel Safety Tips

To see how the DoorJammer works, check out this short video:



Do you really need the DoorJammer if you’re staying in a hotel with both a standard lock and a deadbolt? Probably not. But at hostels, older properties or budget hotels with only single locks or flimsy-looking chains, a product like the DoorJammer can offer an extra layer of protection. It won’t take up much space in your suitcase either: it weighs in at 8 ounces, and stands 4.75 inches high and 2.75 inches wide. You can buy it for $29.99 plus shipping and handling on Door-Jammer.com.

33 Ways to Sleep Better at a Hotel

Want to try it out for yourself? We’re giving away our (gently used) DoorJammer! Just leave us a comment below by 11:59 p.m. ET on October 9, 2013. We’ll pick one person at random to win the DoorJammer. This giveaway is open only to residents of the Lower 48 United States and the District of Columbia. To read the full contest rules, click here.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner of the DoorJammer is Terry Kong. Congratulations!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

vibrating travel beltStanding in the middle of a sidewalk with a map spread out in front of your face, trying to determine whether the cathedral is to the right or left, is a sure way to let everyone know you’re a tourist.

And that’s not only embarrassing; it’s dangerous too. You can be sure pickpockets and scammers are noticing you. But even with maps downsized onto our smartphones, how do you avoid looking like a lost tourist while trying to navigate unfamiliar places?

Enter the vibrating travel belt!

Essential Travel Apps

Here’s how it works. First, type your destination into a special GPS app you’ve downloaded onto your phone to get walking directions. Then plug your belt, which looks like a normal brown belt, into the phone via a small cable. The phone will send the directions to your belt and, as you walk, the belt will vibrate in one of four places indicating which way to go.

Directions call for you to go forward? The front of the belt will vibrate. Time to turn right? The right side of the belt will vibrate. And so on.

Sound too futuristic to be real? You’re halfway right. Triposo, best known for Android and iOS travel guides, has created a working prototype of the belt, but isn’t yet in a position to make it available to the general public.

The Art of Travel: How to Get Lost in a High-Tech World

The company is currently raising funds for the belt’s production on Indiegogo.com. If the financial goal is reached, Triposo hopes to make the belt available by February 2014. Would you buy it?

– written by Dori Saltzman