Home

Home Travel Tips Travel Deals Destinations Trip Reviews Forums Blog
The IndependentTraveler.com Blog

Here’s something fun to kick off your weekend. It’s a travel-themed picture puzzle. You just have to tie the photos together to make words. For example, a photo of an eye, combined with a photo of a full glass of water would be eye + full = Eiffel. Get it? (For another example, check out last week’s puzzle.)

This week’s puzzle is two words and represents an idyllic vacation destination.

Once you think you know the answer, post it below. You have until Monday, September 2, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Teresa Brecht, who correctly guessed that the pictogram spelled “Bora Bora.” Teresa has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Congratulations! Stay tuned for further opportunities to win.


– written and created by Dori Saltzman

child kid airplane planeWhen it comes to kid-free zones on planes, Asian airlines continue to be trailblazers. A year after Malaysia Airlines introduced child-free sections on its A380 planes, Singapore Airlines’ low-cost carrier, Scoot, is following suit. USA Today reports that fliers can pay $15 to sit in the new “ScootinSilence” section in the front of the economy cabin, where seats have extra legroom and kids under age 12 will not be permitted. Another Asian carrier, AirAsia X, also recently added a kid-free “Quiet Zone.”

Although no U.S. airlines have instituted similar measures, kid-free zones seem to be a growing trend that could catch on around the globe if they continue to be popular in Asia. Our own Traveler’s Ed has spoken up in favor — check out 10 Reasons Every Plane Should Have a Family Zone. Meanwhile, contributing editor Erica Silverstein offers a parent’s perspective on how we can all just get along when both adults and children are in the same cabin: An Open Letter to People Who Hate Flying with Kids.

Do you think more airlines should add child-free zones? Speak out in the comments below!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

seattle bus stationFor a few weeks now, I’ve spent nearly every evening knee-deep in plans for an upcoming trip to Seattle. I’ve booked a hotel, drooled over potential restaurant menus, and made a list of must-visit museums, bookstores and parks. But while my excitement is building, there’s one aspect of the trip that makes me a little nervous: riding public buses.

It’s an embarrassing admission to make, especially for someone who has traveled across four continents and writes about travel for a living. I am generally unfazed by airports and can handle the world’s subways and trains with aplomb, but city buses are somehow just … different. There’s no fixed endpoint or neatly labeled station to mark where I’m supposed to get off; instead I hover at the edge of my seat, watching the unfamiliar streets sliding by, glancing surreptitiously at my map to try to figure out where I am and when to signal the driver for my stop. No matter how many times I do it, I still get stressed out.

I usually find myself throwing myself on the mercy of the bus driver or a fellow passenger to help me get off at the right place. As an introvert, I’m intimidated by that too — especially overseas when there’s a language barrier in the mix! But luckily, it almost always works. Relying on the kindness of strangers, no matter how shy I am about doing it, has rarely led me astray in my travels.

In a very small way, riding public buses enables me to do something many of us want to do when we travel: step out of our comfort zone. Travel isn’t really travel to me without a little frisson of nerves mixed in with excitement and anticipation. After all, if we’re not stretching ourselves somehow, we may as well stay home.

Culture Shock: Outside the Comfort Zone

How do you step out of your own comfort zone when you travel?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

temple bell jeju island koreaEach month, we’ll highlight one new trip review submitted by an IndependentTraveler.com reader. If your review is featured, you’ll win an IndependentTraveler.com logo item!

In this month’s featured review, reader Margot MacPherson Brewer explores a country few Westerners visit: Korea. “Jeju Island is a tropical paradise that is under the radar and hosts mainly an ongoing influx of tourists from the Chinese mainland,” wrote Margot. “Jeju’s location in relation to South Korea combined with North Korea’s nuclear sabre-rattling this spring had clearly discouraged many Western visitors and we encountered less than a half dozen in our travels on Jeju.”

Read the rest of Margot’s review here: Korean Adventure. This reader has won an IndependentTraveler.com duffel bag!

Feeling inspired? Write your own trip review!

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Suffering from the Monday doldrums? For everyone out there facing the beginning of another work week, here’s a little jolt of wanderlust to brighten up your morning. Each Monday, we offer a photo of a spectacular place to spark ideas for your future travels.

This week’s shot was snapped in the old medina of Chefchaouen, Morocco, a town known for its distinctive blue and white architecture.

chefchaouen morocco


Morocco Trip Reviews

Send us your best travel shot! E-mail your most beautiful or captivating travel photo to feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put Monday Inspiration in the subject line.)

12 International Foods to Try Before You Die

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Here’s something fun to kick off your weekend. It’s a travel-themed picture puzzle. You just have to tie the photos together to make words. For example, a photo of an eye, combined with a photo of a full glass of water would be eye + full = Eiffel. Get it? (For another example, check out last week’s puzzle.)

This week’s puzzle is two words and represents a famous attraction.

Once you think you know the answer, post it below. You have until Monday, August 26, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Jackie Laulainen, who correctly guessed that the pictogram spelled “Machu Picchu.” Jackie has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug. Congratulations! Stay tuned for further opportunities to win.


– written and created by Dori Saltzman and Sarah Schlichter

I’ve always had a long bucket list. At last count it was up to 19 experiences, and already I despaired of ever crossing them all off. Then IndependentTraveler.com launched a new series of destination slideshows featuring 10 to 13 amazing (and often little known) things to do in countries around the world. And bang, my bucket list jumped from 19 to 25 in a matter of minutes. Now I’ve had a sneak peek at two of our upcoming slideshows, covering Turkey and France, and I’m pretty sure that 25 is about to go up to 27.

Because “misery” loves company, I feel compelled to share those experiences that most resonated with me. Lock down your bucket lists before reading on or you may find your list of must-do travel experiences growing too.

matera cave hotelsCaving
Did you know you can spend the night in an ancient cave in Italy? Neither did I until I started researching unusual things to do in the country. But once I read about the Matera cave hotels I was hooked. The idea of staying in a cave some ancient human may have slept in (but also having indoor plumbing!) is amazing to me. And the photos of the hotels with low-hanging stone ceilings, claw-foot bathtubs and candle-lit niches … all I can say is, I’ve definitely got to get there someday.

See More Amazing Italy Experiences

costa rica jungle lodgeCall of the Jungle
I don’t know what it says about me, but I’m way more excited by the thought of staying in a jungle eco-lodge (or the aforementioned caves) than a posh, five-star hotel. And though I always knew Costa Rica was the destination for eco-travelers, I didn’t realize how funky and fun-sounding the lodges there are. Like the Pacuare Jungle Lodge, which you can only get to via a whitewater rafting trip or a gondola ride. Talk about the middle of the jungle!


Check Out Other Exotic Things to Do in Costa Rica

ireland bargingBarging Right In
I readily admit I’m a bit of a Celtophile. Ireland is one of my favorite countries. I’ve been there four times and intend to go back again (and again!). But I thought I was pretty familiar with all the country had to offer until I wrote the 12 Best Ireland Experiences slideshow. I had no idea you could travel the country’s waterways on your own! Imagine steering your own barge peacefully along the river from near Dublin down to the Waterford area. Read a book, wave to the locals walking along the water, stop in a village for a brew at the neighborhood pub. What a lovely way to see Ireland’s picturesque towns and villages!

saxon switzerland national parkForest Imaginings
I don’t know what it is about primeval forests that catch my fancy. There’s just something about the immensity of them — towering trees, lofty stone cliffs, darkness carpeting the forest floor punctured by bolts of sunlight — that makes me catch my breath. So learning about the Saxon Switzerland National Park in East Germany was an eye-opener. With its tall limestone needles, evergreen-carpeted cliff faces, and miles of hikable forests, meadows and fields, this national secret is now firmly planted on my bucket list.

Other Cool Germany Experiences to Check Out

england yurtMongolian England
They had me at yurt. Yes, I said yurt, and I don’t even have to trek all the way to Mongolia. No, I can jet across the pond, make my way to a scenic English forest — the kind Robin Hood could make a home in — spend the day horseback riding and sampling the cider at a local pub called the King’s Arms, and then spend the night in an authentic Mongolian yurt. How cool is that!

Discover 12 More Great England Experiences

Shh, Don’t Tell
We haven’t launched our Turkey and France slideshows yet, but I can tell you I’m very excited to learn more about sea kayaking over the ancient ruins of a Turkish city and exploring the Celtic history of France’s Brittany region. Stay tuned.

– written by Dori Saltzman

hemingway home catHi, my name is Ashley, and I’m a crazy cat lady.

Okay, I like to think I’m not too crazy, but I did adopt a fifth cat last weekend. Of course, I still love to travel, so I got to wondering where my fellow crazy cat ladies and I might go on vacation if we wanted to indulge our passion. Assuming we’re not seeking a fur-free escape, here’s a small list of possibilities.

De Poezenboot (The Cat Boat), Amsterdam, Netherlands
Located along the Singel Canal, this floating cat sanctuary is home to up to 50 cats at any given time. Started by Henriette van Weelde in 1966 when she took a family of stray cats into her residence, De Poezenboot quickly expanded to a barge and then a house boat as the number of cats in need of homes continued to grow. You can stop in to see the kitties, make donations and buy souvenir T-shirts from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. daily, except Sundays and Wednesdays, at Singel 38 G.

Our Favorite Hotels in Amsterdam

Tashirojima Island (Cat Island), Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan
Years ago, when silk production was at its peak there, the island’s inhabitants used cats to keep the mouse population to a minimum. (Mice are a threat to silkworms.) Stray cats now outnumber the island’s 100 residents. You can access the island via ferry from Ishinomaki City.

Hemingway Home, Key West, Florida, United States
This one will appeal to crazy cat ladies and literature buffs alike. Home to the late author Ernest Hemingway, this historic building — also a museum — has between 40 and 50 cats in residence. All of the felines are polydactyls (or carry the polydactyl gene), which means many have paws with what appear to be tiny, furry thumbs. It’s said that many of these cats are descendents of Hemingway’s original pet cat, Snowball, who was also a polydactyl. Tours of the house are available every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 907 Whitehead Street.

Learn More About Key West

The Alamo, San Antonio, Texas, United States
A landmark that housed missionaries in the 1700′s, the Alamo is most famous for its role in the Texas Revolution. Resident cats have roamed the area before, but perhaps the most famous is the Alamo’s current feline, Clara Carmack or C.C. (named after Clara Driscoll and Mary Carmack, who played important roles in the building’s preservation). Visit for a dose of history and a possible C.C. sighting every day, except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 300 Alamo Plaza. (Read about one IndependentTraveler.com reader’s quest to see C.C. the Alamo Cat!)

– written by Ashley Kosciolek

the trip tribeEver been stuck on a bus tour with a group of fellow travelers that you have absolutely nothing in common with? (Is that why you usually avoid bus tours in the first place?) A new travel site is hoping to make this dilemma a thing of the past.

TheTripTribe.com offers members-only vacations that let you see the profiles of other travelers who are already booked on each trip, including their age, home town and travel preferences (such as what level of exertion they prefer, ranging from “sleeping on a beach” to “expedition to North Pole”). The site is still growing, but eventually hopes to match members with recommended trips based on their personality and interests.

The site lists both “live trips” (which can be booked) and “crave trips,” which are in the planning stages but won’t actually happen unless enough members show interest.

Most of the live trips cost between $1,000 and $2,000 per person, not including airfare, and emphasize outdoor adventure or fitness. One that caught our eye was the Everyday Paleo Italy Adventure, a six-night trip featuring accommodations in a castle overlooking the Adriatic Sea. Hosting the trip will be Sarah Fragoso, author of “Everyday Paleo” (about the popular diet emphasizing lean meats and vegetables). Activities during your stay include truffle hunting, hiking, yoga on the beach, a tour of the nearby medieval town of Petritoli, wine tasting, workout sessions with Fragoso and more. The trip departs June 1, 2014, and starts at $1,790 per person when you book by August 31. (After that, the price jumps to $1,990.)

11 Best Italy Experiences

Current “crave trips” include a journey to Easter Island, an Antarctica cruise, a trekking safari in Tanzania and a yoga retreat in Bali.

Want to try it out? We’ve got an exclusive bonus for IndependentTraveler.com readers! Join the site via this link and you’ll get a $50 credit to use toward a future trip.

8 Tours for People Who Don’t Like Tours

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Suffering from the Monday doldrums? For everyone out there facing the beginning of another work week, here’s a little jolt of wanderlust to brighten up your morning. Each Monday, we offer a photo of a spectacular place to spark ideas for your future travels.

This week’s shot of a colorful tree frog was taken near the border of Costa Rica and Panama.

tree frog costa rica panama rain forest


12 Best Costa Rica Experiences

Send us your best travel shot! E-mail your most beautiful or captivating travel photo to feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put Monday Inspiration in the subject line.)

Panama Trip Reviews

– written by Sarah Schlichter