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suitcase cell phone womanMaybe you’re having a disastrous day at the airport, trying unsuccessfully to get rebooked after a canceled flight. Or you’re sitting at home on hold with an airline’s customer service department, listening to hour two of Elevator Music’s Greatest Hits. In growing frustration, you may be tempted to take your complaint to social media — but when you pull up your airline’s Twitter page, you encounter something like this:

“@jetblue doesn’t respond to formal complaints on Twitter. For official customer concerns go to jetblue.com/speakup or call 1-800-jetblue.”

“Have a complaint/compliment to share with us? Go to usairways.com/feedback so we can followup [sic] directly. We aren’t able to provide a proper response on Twitter.”

“Tweeting is short and sweet, but sometimes you need more than 140 characters to get an issue resolved. If you require a specific response: For post-travel issues related to travel [on] a United Airlines operated flight, please contact Customer Care at http://united.com/feedback.”

Why are the airlines on social media if they’re just going to shut down the conversation? Can they really do that?

Turns out that they can’t — and despite what their profiles say, they don’t even try. Even though JetBlue claims not to respond to complaints on Twitter, a quick scan of its Twitter page reveals responses to a delayed traveler (“We hear your frustration. What flight are you on so we can provide the most up to date information?”), a person having problems with the airline’s Web site (“You can either try using a different browser or give our Getaways department a call at 1-800-JETBLUE and they can help!”) and a passenger whose TV didn’t work in flight (“Sorry to hear – per our Customer Bill of Rights, you’re entitled to a $15 credit for the inconvenience”) — all within the past 13 hours.

Make Your Travel Complaint Count

US Airways, meanwhile, tweeted this morning that it would rebook a delayed passenger, and asked other travelers having problems to DM (direct message) their confirmation codes so that the carrier’s Twitter team could look into the problem. United Airlines answered traveler questions and offered the appropriate customer service phone numbers and Web sites to Twitter followers who needed more in-depth assistance.

It’s clear that despite the airlines’ efforts to discourage passengers from speaking out on Twitter, people are doing it anyway — and the airlines are responding, often within minutes. Really, it makes sense; a tweet that goes viral can turn into a public relations nightmare, so it’s in the airlines’ best interest to resolve issues on Twitter as quickly and effectively as possible.

So the next time you’re fed up with a flight, consider the power you have in those simple 140 characters.

How to Use Twitter in Your Travels

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– written by Sarah Schlichter

One Response to “Got a Complaint? Take It to Twitter — Even if Airlines Say Not to”

  1. Dennis McConaughy says:

    I posted several complaints to twitter and they ignore my messages or dont give me a logical reason for not being able to go over 1003 for over 3 weeks and finally I got up to 1007 and now it is stuck on there. From what I see from evidence looking at new twitter followers, I should have somewhere over 1100. We need to work together to force them to take care of this problem. I am considering a lawsuit or some other action to force them to comply.

    I posted a complaint once again a few minutes ago. I wanted to leave a phone number but it seems they are refusing to call someone back because they dont reply back that way. I want to know what kind of legal ramifications would we have by giving our phone number?

    You got my email address.

    We all need to work together on this problem. This hurts my bottom line profit and sales on my book that I am an author of.

    Dennis McConaughy

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