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hotel signThe 2012 Summer Olympic Games are in full swing in London, and as is often the case during major events, prices for accommodations were sold at large premiums in the months leading up to the Games. But many hotels have seen less demand than they expected, prompting some to “discount” their inflated rates at the last minute in order to fill still-empty rooms.

According to the Press Association, some booking engines reported prices inflated as much as 300 percent over the past two months, but say rates have since fallen back to levels that are closer to the norm.

Over-inflated prices aren’t uncommon when major events come to town, such as Mardi Gras New Orleans or Venice‘s Carnevale, but when demand is lower than expected, prices do sometimes fall — leaving visitors who booked early feeling ripped off. So what’s a budget traveler to do to protect against price gouging when inflation is an issue?

1. Use sites like Tingo.com, which will credit your card accordingly if the price of your booked hotel room drops. (See Want a Hotel Refund? Yes. Please. to learn more about Tingo.)

2. Look into refundable rates, check cancellation policies and consider purchasing appropriate travel insurance in case you have buyer’s remorse after booking an expensive room. Whether you find a cheaper room elsewhere or just flat-out decide to forgo the entire trip, you’ll be more likely to get your money back.

3. Ditch the hotel. If hotels are out of your price range during certain special events, consider staying at a hostel, a bed and breakfast or someone’s home (also known as couch surfing). Vacation rentals are also another option, which can be less expensive and offer more homey comforts.

Have you ever overpaid for a hotel during a major world event? Leave your comments below.

– written by Ashley Kosciolek

Editor’s Note: IndependentTraveler.com is published by The Independent Traveler, Inc., a member of the TripAdvisor Media Network, which also owns Tingo.com.

alligator man new orleansThanks to everyone who participated in last Friday’s photo caption contest. We received some great submissions, but our favorite was from Tom, who wrote, “You remind me of my ex-wife….” Tom has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug.

Runners-up that we also loved:

“I’m sorry buddy but my wife really wants that purse.” — Cheryl Harbert

“Seriously, your skin is so soft! What’s your secret?” — TS Buchanan

“WHEN DID THESE FEELINGS OF DEPRESSION START? I SEE… YOU ARE MISUNDERSTOOD, NOT A PURSE OR PAIR OF SHOES AND ACTUALLY CANNOT STAND THE TASTE OF HUMAN FLESH — YOU’RE A VEGAN, YOU SAY?” — Diane H

To see all of the submissions, click here.

This week’s photo was snapped by IndependentTraveler.com News Editor Dori Saltzman. Do you have a funny or bizarre photo that we could use for a future caption contest? Send it to us at feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put “Caption Contest” in the subject line.) If we feature your photo on our blog, we’ll send you a prize.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

What’s going on in this photo? Come up with a clever caption for this silly travel pic and you could win an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug.

alligator man new orleans


To enter, drop your wittiest one-liner (or two-liner, or three-liner…) in the comments by Sunday night, July 29, 2012, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time. We’ll contact the winner and reveal our favorite caption on Monday. Please be sure to abide by our community guidelines when commenting.

Today’s photo was snapped by IndependentTraveler.com News Editor Dori Saltzman in New Orleans. Do you have a funny or bizarre photo that we could use for a future caption contest? Send it to us at feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put “Caption Contest” in the subject line.) If we feature your photo on our blog, we’ll send you a prize.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

heathrow airportSome of us love crowds. We can be found catching beads at Mardi Gras, hurling tomatoes at Tomatina and, at the London Games, ogling the athletes at the Horse Guards Parade — the venue for beach volleyball.

Not me. Ever since I spent a horrific New Year’s Eve in Times Square, I’ve been a bit crowd-phobic. The cheer isn’t enough to override the crowds and the commotion at the London Games. For the executive editor of our sister site, Cruise Critic, it’s the increased security at Heathrow that keeps her from London, even as a layover to Europe.

“The increased security is sure to add even more chaos to an already chaotic airport — and I still won’t feel completely safe,” Carolyn Spencer Brown told us.

Are You a Travel Olympian?

She’d like to avoid Heathrow this summer, but some airfare deals are making that difficult. “British Airways is offering cheap fares to Europe this summer,” Brown said. “I wonder if people are avoiding Heathrow.”

If they are shunning Heathrow and London, it’s a typical tendency to avoid visiting cities that host the Olympic Games. The Telegraph recently reported that Terry Williamson, chief operating officer of JacTravel, said “normal tourism” in past Olympic host cities post-Games dropped significantly during the events and “took some time to recover.”

Will the traffic, the crowds, the amped-up security, the missiles on rooftops keep you away from London this summer — even as a layover? Or will you be there — in the midst of it all? Vote in our poll below.

– written by Jodi Thompson

galapagosBe you bucket lister or wildlife buff, the idea of cruising the Galapagos is imbued with animal magnetism. It’s evocative of a science fiction adventure — ship as time machine transporting travelers to a prehistoric land of black lava, alien cactus trees and giant tortoises.

It turns out that planning for such a voyage, which includes ticking off items like “underwater camera housing” or “quick-drying pants that magically become shorts,” is oddly satisfying. So with the determination of a flightless cormorant who hasn’t had eel in a week, I began researching, prepping and packing for a July Galapagos cruise aboard Metropolitan Touring’s 48-passenger La Pinta.

As I dug through travel message boards and guidebooks, and picked the brains of past passengers, there emerged four cornerstones of the successful Galapagos cruise: protection from the sea and weather, proper footwear, a touch of pre-cruise study, and a means to record the experience of wandering onto a beachhead littered with groaning sea lions and thousands of fluorescent orange crabs.

6 Reasons You’ll Love an Expedition Cruise

Protection from Sea and Sun
The packing list skewed more backpacker’s trek than cruise. Instead of a blue blazer and dress shoes, I stuffed my carry-on with quick-dry shirts, zip-top bags to protect equipment and a floppy hat to repel the equatorial sun. Also part of the regimen: two large tubes of sunblock, one SPF 45 for the delicate face, the other a waterproof 30 for the rest of the body — plus aloe, should I forget to re-apply either.

The sea poses its own problems — the wind-drawn Humboldt Current can bring with it nauseating, choppy waters from July to December — so I scored some Dramanine (which I later found that La Pinta offered in an all-you-can eat basket). Other passengers ultimately went with the prescription motion sickness patch, the dot-behind-the-ear option not available in South America.

Footwear
Simply put, lava, over which many of the hikes take place, is unforgiving. Still, I left my hiking boots at home, opting instead for the TEVA sandals I’ve taken over rocky Greek Isles, European cobbles and dessert sands. However Galapagos visitors roll, they should make sure they’re properly out-footed. “A lot of people think, ‘Oh, I’ll just bring my oldest pair of shoes and then dump them at the end of the trip,'” said John, one of our guides. “If there’s one tip I can offer, it’s to bring a solid new pair.” (Break them in pre-trip to avoid calluses.) Sure enough, one French passenger suffered a dual sole-ripping on a single walk. His well-worn boots literally ripped in half. Given his propensity for mocking American dining habits, no one seemed too upset for him.

How to Pack for an Active Outdoor Vacation

Pre-Cruise Enrichment
The Galapagos is a place where pre-knowledge enriches the experience — or so I was told. “On the Origin of Species” felt a little too “Challenges of Modernity,” a 200-level class, so I tapped Dominic Hamilton, Metropolitan’s Head of Communications, for something less collegiate. He suggested three: “The Beak of the Finch,” a non-fiction look at a pair of evolutionary biologists who watched natural selection, in real time, shape a colony of finches; “My Father’s Island,” a memoir written by a woman whose family colonized Santa Cruz in the 40’s; and “Galapagos, the Islands That Changed the World,” a photo-laden companion book to the BBC documentary of the same name. My public library had them all and all were winners.

Capturing the Tortoise
travel packingThough the local wildlife remains bizarrely apathetic to encroaching, camera-wielding homo sapiens, a colleague’s husband suggested renting a telephoto lens. I discovered LensProtoGo, which ships the lens in a waterproof, nearly indestructible Pelican case. The Nikon 80 – 400 millimeter telephoto lens costs about $1,600 new but only $15 a day to rent, and is ideal for framing the red-rimmed eye of the swallow-tailed gull or spying on other expedition ships. If you do bring the “bazooka” and plan on switching lenses, don’t forget the accouterments (a sensor cleaning kit). Jumbo-sized zip-top bags, procured from Amazon.com, would shield my camera equipment, already in a water-resistant bag, during wet landings (when Zodiacs pull up to a beach rather than a natural “dock”).

A second splurge, inspired by Galapagos cruise vets who shared regrets, was an underwater camera. I opted for a waterproof case for my Canon S90 point and shoot, which cost about $150. The video I took underwater, including a spiritual moment with a baby sea lion, was worth the cost.

The one thing I didn’t pack? My cat, a plague-like invasive species, had to stay.

– written by Dan Askin

suitcase handleOn a recent trip to London, I bought a newspaper and sat on the train reading about the mounting worries surrounding the Olympic Games — with the U.K.’s transport infrastructure already struggling to cope with the influx of extra people.

Athletes visiting the U.K. have had to compete with slow-moving airport security and long queues, while a coach-load of Olympians was recently stuck for four hours in London traffic on its way to the Olympic Village. Onboard was American hurdler Kerron Clement, who tweeted, “Athletes are sleepy, hungry and need to pee.” It seems that, where travel’s concerned, we all have to deal with the same problems, no matter who we are.

This got me thinking of the trials we all face while traveling and made me wonder, could travel be a sport that I could actually compete in? Consider the potential events:

First up, weight lifting. Whether lugging a heavy suitcase from the car to the airport check-in or making the final heave into the overhead bin, we’ve all competed in this event before. It’s familiar territory for the Olympic traveler, and the key is in the preparation. Packing light is one of the hardest things to do, but as the old adage goes, “You never use what you don’t take.”

The Carry-On Challenge: How to Pack Light Every Time

Next, the 100-meter sprint to meet check-in. Most airlines require passengers to be at the airport a couple of hours before take-off, which can sometimes catch travelers out, particularly early in the morning. The most successful competitors will have already mapped their route and will diligently avoid all fast food and souvenir concessions, passport and tickets in hand, to get to the desk on time. Some will need to slalom between other vacationers or even indulge in some light wrestling in order to get their times down. You’ve got to want it!

16 Ways to Get Through the Airport Faster

Synchronised swimming could be my stumbling block. I hate overcrowded swimming pools! Sometimes it’s nice when arriving at a destination, even before unpacking, to cool down with a dip. Faced with a jam-packed pool, though, I’d likely slink off with my towel to see if there were a quiet beach nearby. Synchronised swimming? Not for me.

10 Things to Do in the First 24 Hours of Your Trip

The relay is tough. I’ve been on trips where I’ve had to transfer trains six times. My budget “saver” tickets meant I had to make every transfer (with very narrow time margins) or risk not getting to my destination at all. The period between trains is always the most stressful, frantically checking platform displays, with one eye on your watch. This can be bad in huge international airports too, with terminals sometimes being up to 15 minutes’ walk away from each other. Smooth transitions make for a smooth journey — it takes an expert traveler to score highly in the relay.

As is traditional, we should end with the marathon. I’ll put my hand up and say that long-haul traveling’s not something I enjoy. My longest trip started with 10 hours in a car, followed by 6 hours on a bus and another hour on a plane. The ultimate long-haul trip is Singapore Airlines’ nonstop flight between Newark Airport and Singapore, which takes a whopping 18.5 hours. I just don’t think I have the stamina.

10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

How do you compare? Are there any facets of travel at which you are a true Olympian?

– written by Josh Thomas

man in mayan chairThanks to everyone who participated in last Friday’s photo caption contest. We received some great submissions, but our favorite was from Kelsey, who wrote, “Dude, do I look like I care what you want for Christmas?” Kelsey has won an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug.

Runners-up that we also loved:

“Phil was later surprised to learn that it was a throne of a different sort when he noticed the locals couldn’t stop laughing.” — Perry

“Chuck tries to muster as much dignity as possible as he takes part in the ancient Aztec lap dance ceremony.” — Ian J

“And I would like a spear, tiki hut, pet monkey…” — Rhonda Geiger

To see all of the submissions, click here.

Do you have a funny or bizarre photo that we could use for a future caption contest? Send it to us at feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put “Caption Contest” in the subject line.) If we feature your photo on our blog, we’ll send you a prize.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

What’s going on in this photo? Come up with a clever caption for this silly travel pic and you could win an IndependentTraveler.com travel mug.

man mayan chair


To enter, drop your wittiest one-liner (or two-liner, or three-liner…) in the comments by Sunday night, July 22, 2012, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time. We’ll contact the winner and reveal our favorite caption on Monday. Please be sure to abide by our community guidelines when commenting.

Do you have a funny or bizarre photo that we could use for a future caption contest? Send it to us at feedback@independenttraveler.com. (Please put “Caption Contest” in the subject line.) If we feature your photo on our blog, we’ll send you a prize.

– written by Sarah Schlichter

cheesy touristI usually love meeting fellow travelers. They’ve pointed me in the right direction when I was lost, translated for me in places where I couldn’t speak the language and livened up long plane rides with fascinating conversation.

But not all my fellow travelers are such exemplary citizens. Woe be unto you if you’re trapped on a train or tour with one of the four types of travel boors below. Which ones do you recognize?

The Name Dropper
This is the tourist who can’t appreciate the place she’s in now because she’s too busy showing off where else she’s been. “This temple is almost as impressive as the one we saw in Cambodia last year!”

16 Signs You’re Addicted to Travel

The Royal Pain
“Does the Mediterranean salad come with iceberg lettuce or mesclun? … Mesclun? Okay, I’ll have that. But with shrimp instead of chicken. No tomatoes or olives, but lots of extra cheese. Goat cheese though, not feta. Oh, and can you put the dressing on the side?” Oh, and can you say high-maintenance?

The Know-It-All
If you’ve ever heard someone asking a tour guide questions just so he can expound upon the guy’s answers, or been subject to an unsolicited lecture on the flora and fauna of the Costa Rican rain forest, you’ve encountered this all-too-common travel bore — er, boor.

The Traveler Who Never Leaves Home
Oh, sure, he may have flown a couple thousand miles, but he still expects all his usual creature comforts: climate control, familiar foods (“Where’s the nearest McDonald’s?”) and people around him who speak English, no matter where in the world he goes. Friendly hint: If you want all the comforts of home, just stay home.

10 Annoying Habits of Our Fellow Travelers

Which travelers would you add to this list?

– written by Sarah Schlichter

Today, during my usual lunchtime sanity break, I peeled myself from my desk and ventured outside in search of food. The wall of hot air that greeted me was stifling. To the chagrin of several women in the knitting store across the way, I immediately stripped down to my underwear. Okay, not really — but I did seriously consider it as I watched a small child attempting to fry an egg in the parking lot.

The latest heat wave here in the Northeastern U.S. has brought temperatures in the 90’s for the past several weeks, and it’s constantly got me wishing I were anywhere but here — anywhere that’s cooler than here, that is.

Take a peek below for four places and activities that I’ve been dreaming about almost daily of late. If you’re anything like me, you’ll feel cooler just looking at them.

Visiting Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

glacier bay national park



Swimming at Dunn’s River Falls, Ocho Rios, Jamaica

dunns river falls jamaica



Skiing in Queenstown, New Zealand

queenstown skiing



Touring the (air-conditioned!) Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City

metropolitan museum of art new york



Where would you like to cool off right about now?

– written by Ashley Kosciolek