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The IndependentTraveler.com Blog

Each month, we’ll highlight one new trip review submitted by an IndependentTraveler.com reader. If your review is featured, you’ll win an IndependentTraveler.com logo item!

making spring rolls vietnam In this month’s winning review, a traveler and his wife return to Vietnam three years after their first visit. “There is so much to see in Vietnam we knew that we would be going back to visit places that we just did not have time to see,” writes John Rybczyk. One of the highlights was a hands-on culinary experience: “On our way to Hoi An (with our driver and guide) we stopped and visited Tra Que Herb Village. We had the opportunity to work the farm and learn how to prepare and cook Vietnamese food. So Barb and I and the cook made our lunch; we each had a turn cooking.”

Read the rest of John’s review here: 2nd Time Vietnam – Even Better. This reader has won an IndependentTraveler.com duffel bag!

Feeling inspired? Write your own trip review!

— written by Sarah Schlichter

standing on the beaches of Southern IndiaIt’s hard to admit you might never be back — standing on the shore of southern India at sunrise, staring down into the faces of the Terra Cotta Warriors, even sitting in the lobby of a local beach club. Whether it’s due to distance, financial/unforeseen circumstances, health or simply a lack of time, there’s no telling when we go someplace new whether we’ll ever make it back. That’s why traveling in the moment (much like living in the moment) is so important — especially with screens and lenses constantly competing for our attention.

From a family’s trip to the World Trade Center weeks before the 9/11 attacks to the beaches of my very own New Jersey, standing with a wedding party days before Hurricane Sandy destroyed the venue, sightseeing and celebrating would mean so much less if I didn’t take the time to appreciate my surroundings. These are both extreme cases where the destination will never be the same whether I am there or not, but for many places we visit in a lifetime, who can promise we’ll get to experience them all over again? Do you want to collect memories or likes on your Facebook account?

Single Travel: Tips for Going Solo

Traveling through Vancouver on my first real solo trip this past July, it could have been devastatingly easy to tap my smartphone mindlessly over a meal or while sitting alone in a park, but I didn’t. Call it a test, call it a conscious effort, but from the first breakfast at the cafe counter downstairs from where I was staying, I tucked my phone away and did anything else — read a paper, looked around, focused on how my food tasted — without taking a photo and posting it to Instagram. This might sound ridiculous to those who haven’t been initiated into the demanding universe of social media, but to me it was a whole new world. Having a picturesque cocktail and multicourse feast in an underground Lebanese joint reminiscent of Casablanca — and not posting a thing about it — was like sharing a delicious secret with myself.

I constantly struggle with a strong yearning to document my travels, but capturing the moment to look at it later isn’t always the best option. There’s so many times I look back and wish I had simply been present in that instant without any other distraction — a community center performance in South Africa, any cathedral in Europe. Pictures and videos can be a poignant way to share an experience, capture a memory to look back on, create something artistic, but there’s a time to put the camera down. In an oversaturated, media-sharing-obsessed society, that time is increasingly difficult to gauge, but the instinct should continue to live in the guts of travelers who do so for the pure reason of savoring the experience; listen to that instinct.

Which place do you wish you could go back to and be more “present”?

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

Maybe you’re sick of summer’s heat and humidity. Or maybe you’re blissfully reading this from an iPad on the beach. But whether you love it or hate it, summer’s days are numbered — and that means it’s just about time to look ahead to fall.

Where will you travel in the coming months? Here are four fall trips to consider, depending on your interests.

lake district autumn


Looking for leaf-peeping? Consider a jaunt across the pond to England‘s Lake District, whose forested hills come alive with color in the autumn months. There are plenty of places for a stroll in and around Lake District National Park.

lighthouse prince edward island


In need of a little relaxation? Combine lobster, lighthouses and laid-back charm on a road trip around Prince Edward Island, Canada. Famous as the setting for the “Anne of Green Gables” novels and miniseries, the island’s rolling farms and red sandy beaches are the perfect place to unwind and enjoy the simple beauty of the landscape.

grand knip beach curacao


Not ready to let go of summer? Head down to Curacao, known for its pastel-colored capital and peaceful white sand beaches. As one of the ABC islands (along with Aruba and Bonaire), Curacao is far enough south to miss most of the hurricanes that plague other Caribbean islands this time of year.

Which Caribbean Island Is Right for You?

oryx namaqualand south africa


Want to watch wildlife? Journey to South Africa for a taste of spring south of the equator. South Africa made it into our list of 12 Places That Shine in Shoulder Season for several key reasons: Safaris are often a little cheaper this time of year, temperatures are a little more comfortable and wildlife watchers can partake in an annual Whale Festival in Hermanus.

Photos: 10 Best South Africa Experiences

Where are you headed this fall?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

Every week in our “Spotlight on …” feature, we’ll highlight a different country around the world.

indonesia volcano


Population: 256 million

Currency: Rupiah

Phrase to Know: Siapa nama anda? (What’s your name?)

Fun Fact: Indonesia’s top Olympic sport is badminton, which accounts for 18 of the country’s 27 medals to date.

We Recommend: Getup at 2 a.m. and hike to the top of Mount Batur, where you can eat breakfast and watch the sun rise — the view makes the early wake-up call worth it.

10 Best Indonesia Experiences

Have you been to Indonesia? What was your favorite spot?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

This week’s brainteaser is a Friday Word Puzzle. We’ll give you a category and the first letters of five countries that fall into that category, and you fill in the rest. Keep in mind that there may be more than one possible response for each letter. For examples, check out this blog post.

Ready to give it a try? Here’s this week’s challenge:

index card puzzle


Enter your list of countries in the comments below. You have until Monday, August 24, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Kelly Malleck, who has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Check out the winning entry below.

countries with both a president and prime minister


Stay tuned for further chances to win!

— created by Dori Saltzman

Paris is known for many charms: fresh-baked croissants, sidewalk cafes, winding cobblestone lanes — and an iconic, low-rise skyline punctuated by the Eiffel Tower. This could change soon, however, as the city’s building height restriction was recently abolished, and construction on a new, 590-foot office tower could begin as soon as next year, reports CNN.

The project is known as the Tour Triangle, or Triangle Tower, designed by Herzog & de Meuron (the architecture firm behind the unique Bird’s Nest stadium used in the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games). The mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, recently tweeted a photo of the proposed building:

According to CNN, supporters of the project argue that the tower will provide much-needed office space and jobs, and raise the city’s profile in the eyes of international investors. But others aren’t convinced. A spokesperson from a local group called the Collective against the Triangle Tower tells CNN, “Tour triangle disrespects the existing place and Paris skyline. We are convinced that contemporary architecture can express itself in harmony with existing place. It is not the case with this isolated skyscraper which is 180 meters high and 150 meters wide.” Beyond aesthetics, the group has spoken out against the tower’s environmental impact as well.

Photos: 12 Best France Experiences

More worrisome to those hoping to preserve the current architectural landscape is the precedent that the new tower could set; CNN reports that a dozen other skyscrapers are in the works in Paris, even though 62 percent of Parisians are opposed to such buildings. The Triangle Tower will likely be challenged in court.

Do you support the building of skyscrapers in Paris?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

I’ve taken many a trip, been on many a flight, and maybe because I’ve been (knock, knock) lucky about not having my luggage lost, I’ve never contemplated what happens to my suitcase after I drop it at the luggage counter. Without much imagination, I always assumed baggage handlers industriously gathered the checked luggage onto carts and wheeled them out to some kind of freight elevator where they journeyed to the tarmac below and were then loaded by another industrious group of baggage handlers onto the plane.

What Do I Do if My Luggage is Lost?

Little did I know, while I’m thumbing through magazines and finding the nearest Jamba Juice before settling in to await the boarding process, my luggage is having the ride of its life — at least it would in Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport, where a first-person (bag) video has recently been released, chronicling a checked bag’s journey through an intricate series of conveyor belts and robotic platforms. Seriously, if this thing were designed for humans, it would be the hottest new theme park attraction.


We found the video on Time.com, but if you browse the airport’s website, you can find a version that allows you to scroll for 360-degree views.

What other inside view of travel would you like to see a video of? Share with us in the comments.

Four High-Tech Luggage Tags and Apps That Will Save Your Trip

— written by Brittany Chrusciel

cabin crew flight attendant pilot planeThere are several areas on planes where access is restricted to crew only. The cockpit is one; baggage storage areas are another. But many passengers — even frequent fliers — don’t realize there are also bunk areas where cabin crew sleep during long-haul flights.

Thanks to an article from Business Insider, we’ve gotten a small glimpse of what these areas look like (although we’re pretty sure they’re smaller than they appear and don’t lend themselves to having, as one commenter put it, “a pre-teen slumber party”).

What’s neat about them is how they’re accessed. Often reached via a secret door near the cockpit and a tiny set of winding stairs, most of these areas can sleep anywhere from six to 10 crewmembers via bunks or side-by-side mattresses divided by curtains or other partitions. Some airlines also offer pajamas.

Even cooler: On certain plane models, these areas have emergency exits that feed into the main passenger cabins through what appear to be normal overhead bins.

10 Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

Did you know these areas existed? What are some of your favorite travel secrets? Be sure to share in the comments below.

— written by Ashley Kosciolek

Every week in our “Spotlight on …” feature, we’ll highlight a different country around the world.

kulusuk greenland


Population: 57,000

Currency: Danish krone

Phrase to Know: Iterluarit (good morning)

Fun Fact: Northeast Greenland National Park is the world’s largest national park, but it’s so remote that only a few hundred people visit each year.

We Recommend: Meet the locals at a kaffemik — an intimate visit to someone’s home for coffee and pastries.

9 Best Greenland Experiences

Have you been to Greenland? What was your favorite spot?

— written by Sarah Schlichter

This Friday’s challenge is a photo of an unidentified place somewhere in the world. Can you tell us where the photo was taken? Leave your guess in the comments below — and check back on Tuesday to see if you were right!

world destination


Hint: One of the region’s holiest places and a pilgrimage site for Christians, this landmark city is famous for its monolithic rock-cut churches.

Enter your guess in the comments below. You have until Monday, August 17, at 11:59 p.m. ET to post your response. We’ll keep all comments private until then. On Tuesday morning we’ll choose one winner at random to receive an IndependentTraveler.com prize. Note: Although all are welcome to play, we can only ship prizes to the Continental U.S.

Editor’s Note: This contest has ended. The winner is Elizabeth A, who correctly guessed that this week’s mystery location was Lalibela, Ethiopia. Elizabeth has won an IndependentTraveler.com logo item. Congratulations! Stay tuned for more chances to win.

See All “Where in the World?” Challenges

— written by Brittany Chrusciel